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  1. #1
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    Default Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    So I decided to run Disk Cleanup today (well just now actually ) and I saw the check box to "Compress Old Files" (note: I am not talking about compressing the WHOLE disk, just the old files) and it occurred to me that I have never really thought about the advantages and/or disadvantages of compressing files.

    So what are some advantages and disadvantages of compressing these "old files" and just for the heck of it, the whole disk? I know one obvious advantage is that you get more disk space, but at what cost?
    **Sony Vaio VGN-SR13GN**
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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    the cost is: slower access of compressed data. and it consumes more resources when accesing the compressed data.
    Windows and Mac user

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    I would strongly discourage compressing the entire disk. Your overall performance is going to drop probably 20% or more, what with the cpu constantly compressing and decompressing every file. However, compressing the old files might not be a bad idea, especially if you are tight on disk space and don't know if you will ever even access those files again.
    Asus N53JF-XE1, Intel Core i5-460, 4GB DDR3, 1920x1080, 1GB Nvidia GeForce GT 425M, 500GB 7200RPM SATA, Windows 7 Ultimate

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    . got enough disk space? leave it alone
    . you never know when the so called "old" files will be needed again
    . the "advantage" of having a few extra gigo is not really advantageous
    . backing up "old" files to external media like cd, dvd or even external hard drive would be my approach

    cheers ...
    m6805 @3700 & sz71WN/C & macbook 2ghz - 4/250gb - superdrive & 7811FX

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    The OS treats the compressed file as if it were uncompressed, so applications can still access it normally. This differs from say, zipping a file, where the application would need to know how to handle a ZIP file or else you need to uncompress it to use it.

    The mechanism Windows uses for compression isn't particularly efficient by today's standards, so for most moderately compressed files the user is not likely to notice the performance impact since it will be rather small. The NTFS compression stuff hasn't changed much since it debuted and was designed to be minimal-impacting on computers from 10 years ago. So your modern dual core box is not going to really be taxed much.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307987

    Compression is nice for storing files on archive drives or external drives where you may need to access the file but don't want the extra step of unzipping it.

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    Disable that feature from Disk Cleanup. Overtime, it'll only slow down the start up process of Disk Cleanup.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/812248

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    thanks for all the info guys
    **Sony Vaio VGN-SR13GN**
    Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo P8400 @ 2.26Ghz
    Memory: 4GB PC2-6400 DDR2-800
    Hard Drive: 250GB SATA + 320GB External Drive
    Video Card: ATi Mobility Radeon HD 3470
    Screen: 13.3" WXGA LED Display
    Operating System: Windows 7 Professional x64

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    The truth of the matter is that it depends a great deal on your CPU and disk.

    There are many situations in which you are disk throughput limited but have CPU to spare--in this case, compression could actually speed things up. In other situations, your CPU is running busy all the time whereas your HD is super fast--compression might slow you down.

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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    I don't agree with that, sorry.

    My harddisk with XP on it is totally compressed and since it is totally compressed my laptop start up much faster, programs start up faster and I don't have any negative issue with it.

    Because a notebook disk is reasonally slow and the most notebook like mine has a dual core the decompression of the data occurs on the fly. UT2004 as example goes from 9,49 GB to 4,88 GB and it starts insanely fast and levels also loads insanely fast.

    The only thing when compression occurs is data defragmentation. I use O&O defrag from my neigbour country German and defrag the files physically by name on the disk and watch the show


    The games I have starts even as fast as on my desktop with a decent 7200 rpm disk uncompressed.

    When copying a database (1,22 GB to 387 MB) loads in 12 seconds in memory (30 MB/s, as fast my harddisk is) and loading 1,22 GB raw last much longer.



    The matter that compression was slow lasts out of the DoubleSpace age when CPU's are less powerfull.

    Zipping files with 4 threads in 7-zip goes with 9-10 MB/s! NTFS is using the Lempel-Ziff 77 compression and that compression method has an 64 KB overhead. LZ77 compress with 17 MB/s and decompress with 98 MB/s on my notebook.

    Only my music and movies on the disk are left uncompressed because FLAC and MP4 won't compress, but the Windows folder compresses greedly.


    http://www.ntfs.com/quest7.htm
    http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs-compressed.htm
    http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs_optimization.htm

    Last link in the middle of the text.

    Greetz and watch the fireworks tonight.
    Last edited by Rogresalor; 31st December 2008 at 09:07 AM.
    Be happy what you have and don't dream on what you can't affort

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Advantages/Disadvantages of Compressing Files

    Compression does increase the time it takes to load files. You might not see the effect of compression on system performance immediately since most systems today have dual core processors. Try running a couple of programs to tie up both of your processor's cores and then try to open the compressed files. Then try the same thing with the same files uncompressed.

    You will see a difference. Compression does not increase system boot speeds nor does it increase program launching speeds. Compression is like having a translator. This adds to the time it takes to complete a conversation or in technical terms, system requests.

    Compression does not cause defragmentation. If you compress before you defragment your system (assuming your system is already fragmented) then compression will increase the fragmentation. If you defragment your system before compressing, then it will not increase fragmentation. When files are uncompressed to be read, they are either written to your system RAM or pagefile depending on the utilization. Compression will actually slow down defragmentation because a file will take up less blocks. When the file is decompressed to be read, if it is written into the pagefile, then the pagefile is the most likely to be fragmented. In the case of compression, the pagefile gets fragmented faster than the rest of the system and as a result, it takes longer for the rest of the system to get fragmented. In the case of no compression, the majority of the fragmentation is not isolated to any specific area, thus the entire system will fragment at almost the same rate.

 

 
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