XPS 15 9570 Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Dell XPS and Studio XPS' started by el3ctronics, May 16, 2018.

  1. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    I would say not in an XPS. In something that can keep it cool it may be a worthy upgrade.
     
  2. Saaaaa

    Saaaaa Notebook Enthusiast

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    i'm thinking the same... will the I9 be a great upgrade? hope to see first reviews...

    Enviado desde mi MI MAX 2 mediante Tapatalk
     
  3. Saaaaa

    Saaaaa Notebook Enthusiast

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    but i9 is faster with the same watts power.. isn't it? so it shouldn't get hotter...

    Enviado desde mi MI MAX 2 mediante Tapatalk
     
  4. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Deity

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    Nominal TDP is same 45W. But higher base and boost clocks.

    It might be able to run nicely when the GPU is off which is important for many. But we must wait for tests, I don't think it is wise to pay so much extra before seeing the results.
     
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  5. Saaaaa

    Saaaaa Notebook Enthusiast

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    B
    But if TDP is the same, it's supose i9 to run faster at the same watt consumption than i7 version?,
    i7 is 2.6ghz and i9 is 2.9ghz at base frequency.... do they both consume the same watts at that base frequency?, if so.... they heat exactly the same at base frequency..... is it that way or am I wrong?
     
  6. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Deity

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    I'm not sure, they might have different curves. The i9 also has more cache, maybe other stuff. Surely the temperature rises with the frequency and at one point (which depends on the cooling) hits the throttling threshold, and PL throttling may kick in due to peripheral temperatures. In the 9550/60, the i7 would run hotter than the i5 despite the same TDP; but individual temperature measurements under Prime95 load had quite a bit of variation, likely due to past job quality etc. But also with the i7 the core temperatures with good paste under max CPU load were around the eighties, not critical, and the problematic throttling was PL type due to un-cooled VRMs. With iunlock's mod some airflow is diverted from the main fins to the added heatsink over the VRM area. This generally has a negative impact on direct CPU cooling, but not so much as to cause problems - but not sure if the same with the i9.
     
  7. MrBuzzkill

    MrBuzzkill Notebook Consultant

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    Technically speaking, the TDP is a worst case scenario maximum heat output a chip can generate (according to Intel). It's a way for device manufacturers to design their cooling solutions. That being said, this does not mean that the device will always use the full TDP and it can actually go beyond its designed TDP over short periods. We know that the 15 watt TDP 8XXXU series can burst to a 25 watt output for short durations of time.

    The i7 8750HQ might have a 45 watt TDP on paper, but in reality it may be 40 watt for 95% of the cases (also, every CPU is unique, some dissipate less heat, some more). Dell, due to limited space and otherwise stupid design choices may actually design a cooling system that can dissipate 35-40 watts of power because they feel it is enough for this device. Then, they choose to stick in the i9. On paper it has the exact same TDP of 45 watt. And in reality, it may actually use the full TDP. But by now, the cooling system isn't 5 watt underspecced, but 10 watt underspecced, causing much heavier throttling. I am pulling these numbers out of my ass, as we don't know the true values, nor do we know how much the cooling can actually dissipate. But it does paint a picture of the issue at hand.

    We do know for a fact that Dell has underspecced the cooling on the XPS 15. Frank Azor specifically mentioned that the XPS 15 was not designed to dissipate the full TDP of the system (combined GPU + CPU TDPs). So while it may be able to dissipate the heat output of only the CPU, it cannot handle both at the same time. And it will especially not handle a GPU and a i9 CPU load at the same time.
     
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  8. docrock

    docrock Notebook Consultant

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    The new fingerprint reader being on the power button is pretty sly.
     
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  9. ThatOldGuy

    ThatOldGuy Notebook Virtuoso

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    This is wrong (no offense). INTEL uses their TDP as an average of the base frequency. Not worst case maximum. So what Azor is really saying, is the system can't operate at its supposed Average TDP. Also if you want to overclock your i9 (and therefore no longer at base frequency), you should be pulling much more power in watts. So why put this chip in here at all?
    upload_2018-5-19_10-4-49.png
     
  10. improwise

    improwise Notebook Deity

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    I assume that most people mentining the GPU in here are refering to the dGPU, ie the nvidia GPU and not the iGPU, right? A laptop not using any GPU isn't much use :)

    That said, I am still not sure how the iGPU affects the TDP and throttling, it would seem logical that a iGPU at max load would generate some heat as well and draw power, which should affect the CPU as well in case they are not totally separated.
     
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