*** XPS 15 7590 Owners Lounge ***

Discussion in 'Dell XPS and Studio XPS' started by Spartan@HIDevolution, Jun 23, 2019.

  1. abujafar

    abujafar Notebook Evangelist

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    @clayton006 LM won't do much because the "thermal bottleneck" are the fans/radiators not the thermal conductivity between CPU die and heatsink.

    I have repasted my 9570 several times with Kryonaut and I noticed only a couple degree improvement over the stock paste.
    Moreover, the heatsink warps easily and it's very hard to get a good/even contact between CPU die and heatsink. This is particularly important for LM applications.
     
  2. clayton006

    clayton006 Notebook Evangelist

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    I've had mixed luck with Kryonaut. I will probably try phobia nanogrease extreme first to help with contact and see how that does.
     
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  3. Jff007

    Jff007 Notebook Enthusiast

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    If someone cooks up a modified heatsink with extra fins/radiators like the ones people were buying from China, the VRM modification Dell made might be more usable.
     
  4. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    I noticed that with my HS as well. The CPU side is naturally curving a bit away from the board, and this goes all the way to the radiator on the CPU side. The heatpipes were also a bit dented, before I even touched it. Hopefully, that doesn't affect the functionality of the heatpipes.

    After ~4 applications, I found my best results (w.r.t. temps) was when I did:
    • apply heavy amount of thermal paste (a tiny bit less than pea-sized, which is a lot for these little dies)
      • This is more than I usually apply on a desktop, but this isn't a desktop heatsink
    • not apply any pressure at all to the heatsink, specifically the parts over the ICs/dies. The only pressure came from the screws/mount
    I did this because I found my previous applications didn't even seem to have any thermal paste residue, and the laptop was throttling, even with a ~100 mV undervolt (at the time, it was applied through XTU; I later switched back to ThrottleStop). The lack of thermal paste residue is not normally alarming. However, that really is only true for computers with good heatsink mounts and large, flat heatsink contact/interface surface. This XPS 15 heatsink was bending before my eyes, and the paste didn't even seem to make it to the entire die.

    Now, with the same 100mV undervolt (100.6mV in ThrottleStop), the laptop doesn't bounce off the 100C thermal limit under CPU-only loads anymore. It's around a stable 95Cish in CPU-only loads. I've also applied a max ratio limit (effective frequency 3.9GHz 1-2 cores, 3.6GHz 4 cores) and a long term power limit of 45W in ThrottleStop (this doesn't seem to stick or work, according to HWINFO and XTU). With those settings, the severe throttling (in gaming) seems to be gone. It still reports throttling, and BH PROCHOT is still triggered, but it's not the 15fps lagfest it was before.

    Again, I know the quad core die is probably the oldest and least refined of the Coffee Lake configurations. But if even a quad core takes this much effort to tame, I really have to tip my hat to those who are wrangling the 6 and 8 cores. Maybe they are just that much more efficient than the quad core. Who knows?
     
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  5. Eason

    Eason Notebook Virtuoso

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    My guess is that by using a temp alarm in Throttlestop of around 20 DTS (CPU) and 73C(GPU) set to trigger a lower-clocked profile will work to control temps and keep the GPU from downclocking to 300 mhz only. Maybe set the max turbo limits to 3.2 Ghz or so on the 2nd profile you have the alarm trigger.
     
  6. abujafar

    abujafar Notebook Evangelist

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    That is a good choice. I got good results (also more durable ones) with IC Diamond.
     
  7. Thysanoptera

    Thysanoptera Notebook Consultant

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    Kroyonaut breaks down above 80C. Excellent choice for water cooled loops that never go above 60C, but in laptop bouncing of 100C it will deteriorate in matter of weeks. Or maybe even days, not sure, it took me three weeks to look at the manufacturer website and forums after I noticed 20C higher idle temps as compared to immediately after repaste.

    IC seems to last forever, and it is dense, kind of helps holding the fragile,bending laptop heatplate in place.
     
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  8. pressing

    pressing Notebook Deity

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    It seems to last a long time IME. On my 2007 MacBook Pro, when temps started to rise, I knew it was time to change. I repaste every say 2 years, but all 8600GT graphics cards are defective so run extra hot, pushing the thermal paste to the limits.

    IC can scratch so I don't use it on newer equipment.
     
  9. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    Do you have a source for this? I've ran Kryonaut on many laptops/desktops and never had such a thing happen...
     
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  10. Thysanoptera

    Thysanoptera Notebook Consultant

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    From their own product page:

    https://www.thermal-grizzly.com/en/products/16-kryonaut-en
    "Kryonaut uses a special structure, which halts the drying out process at temperatures of up to 80° Celsius."

    Sounds like something that Apple marketing would come up with.
     
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