WTF has gone wrong with the PC World?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by HTWingNut, Aug 20, 2015.

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  1. ajkula66

    ajkula66 Courage and Consequence

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    It's called "consumerism"....
     
    Tsunade_Hime and Kent T like this.
  2. ExMM

    ExMM Notebook Evangelist

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    Couldn't agree more, I am really sad too as I love technology.

    I enjoy to read tech articles and buy piece of the latest hardware to push my laptop to the limits and have fun with it.
    Gaming, movies doesn't matter.

    2 years has passed now for my modded P170SM, and I still cannot find anything interested in the market to push my self to buy a new machine.

    Besides this, I am really disappointed with windows 10, considering to move to Linux Mint but scared for gaming performance issues...



    Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
     
  3. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    I don't know if it's really either of those :p Since they'd suggest that the buyer has a certain amount of choice and control over the goods they acquire, and so guide the market - or where the ones producing products do so at the request of a demand. Consumerism is a criticism in a sense of personal buying habits, where we buy things we don't need but can afford, at an unsustainable rate in the long run (though not in the short run, as it makes a company money).

    So it's more that we're talking about a market where we entertain the idea that consumers need to buy whatever product is offered at any time, or else there would be no products to buy at all. Some sort of inverse monopsony I guess. It's kind of curious, was talking with some Microsoft rep. about xbox a few years ago. And I just said it as a joke, you know, that it's a curious marketing ploy, where you actually manage to get people to believe that if the company makes ridiculous amounts of money on a sub-par product, that this will automatically result in a better product being made later on (because some gaming enthusiasts actually believe that - that if they buy Star Wars Dance revolution and the Kinect, that we'd eventually get total immersion VR. Or even that getting total immersion VR is even dependent on suffering through Dance Dance Revolution Star Wars.. That the only way to get a better product is to throw money at Microsoft for products you don't really want in the short run).

    And the guy looks at me with these really suspicious eyes, you know, like I had said something unforgivable and insulting. That I'd spilled out a well-kept masonic secret by accident in public. But that's really how the laptop market tends to function as well. We are essentially fed the idea that there's no money in hardware, and there's no money in creating specified solutions. And that what we should be paying for is the effort and talent it takes to shape the same hardware with unique software solutions. In the sense that even if the product isn't very interesting right now, we should support a company's temporary solutions in the hopes that they'd be successful and then later on produce something incredible.

    Which in practice leads us to the point where the laptop makers are pressured to cut costs on production as much as possible on the same hardware platform, and where the baseline cost really is pressured as far down as it can be from their point of view. And where the budget on specifying and adapting software on top is essentially removed. Because what we're having is a ready-made intel solution in the back, and a Microsoft platform on top. With a very small window where laptop-makers can add new screens or fix the keyboard a bit, and add some custom buttons. And the specification on top is also very limited, and geared into - for example - ready-made platform-dependent solutions.

    It's not that I don't understand the problems laptop makers get into, though. But I would sort of hope that I would hear some laptop maker guys start to talk more about for example utilizing efi bios layers for hardware specification that isn't platform or OS dependent. Things like that - having all the acpi functionality, clocking for hardware/ram/cpu being compatible with an OS layer, but not dependent on a specific OS. And it could be something as simple as moving the keyboard layouts with the extended keys (along with lighting control, device management) into efi-abstraction rather than having it being dependent on wmi, for example. In the sense that something like this would allow users to switch OS more readily, along with the laptop maker actually being able to offer different hardware solutions with the same platform specification.

    You know -- it's simple and small steps like that that would make a difference, even in the small sphere the market is moving around in right now.
     
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