WLAN Choices on Dell...

Discussion in 'Dell' started by manfrog, Mar 31, 2004.

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  1. manfrog

    manfrog Notebook Enthusiast

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    What option is best for a laptop?? What is the advantage of the "Dual band" option? And do I really need the "a" standard on the 1450? Thanks!!

    Intel® PRO/Wireless 2100 WLAN (802.11b) miniPCI Card
    Intel® PRO/Wireless 2200 WLAN (802.11b/g, 54Mbps) miniPCI Card
    Dell TrueMobile™ 1300 WLAN (802.11b/g) miniPCI Card
    Dell Wireless™ 1350 WLAN (802.11b/g, 54Mbps) miniPCI Card
    Dell TrueMobile™ 1400 Dual Band WLAN (802.11a/b/g) miniPCI Card
    Dell Wireless™ 1450 Dual Band WLAN (802.11a/b/g,54Mbps) miniPCI Card





     
  2. TheShaman

    TheShaman Notebook Consultant

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    It depends on what you're using the wireless for.
    If you're setting up a new home network, b/g is the best bet. Get a g router and you're off and running.
    With an existing home network, whatever you've got - most likely b.
    If you're not doing a home network and just want to connect to hotspots or a work network, b will get you by, as the transfer rate is generally faster than a cable/dsl modem can bring in the data. b/g if you worry about work upgrading the network and you want to have the fastest intra-network transfers possible.
    I wouldn't bother with a, because nobody seems to want to take the risk. g is just so much safer because of its backwards compatibility with b.
    The brands Intel and Dell cards should be equally good, because they're running a standard which is defined by a "computer governing council."
    Personally I'll be looking to get a b/g card, but I won't be at all worried if I can only get a b, as I'll be running a wired network at home and only use the wireless to access my school's wireless network.
     
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