Windows 8: The Thread

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Jayayess1190, Jun 1, 2011.

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  1. davepermen

    davepermen Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    it's far from done. one can't remove accounts for example.

    the minimum requirement i have for all of those apps in win8 is to be at least equal to the windows phone 7 apps. and mail there is awesome. they'll sure make you not miss live mail in the future.

    not typical, but logical. what do you mean by turning off the password? i always leave the password, and just set up auto logon and disable lock on standby. both at the ordinary places still. (control userpasswords2 for the autologon)
     
  2. JOSEA

    JOSEA NONE

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    When I say typical, is it not a good idea to do every day tasks logged in with limited user rights?
    When I get to the inital login screen & since I am running in a VM, I just want to go right into win 8 (not hit winkey - E) then type a password. Not a big deal just curious. (Using Oracle Virtual Box)

    Thanks for the rapid response
     
  3. davepermen

    davepermen Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    windows since vista has even the admin with limited user rights. you're only ALLOWED to move to admin when needed. unlike a "real" limited user, which never can do that.

    so no, just use the "admin". which you, actually, never use, except when needed (like, when creating another user. a limited-only user could never create another one. hence the "it's not typical, but logical". if you'd never be admin, you could never do stuff).

    that's the structure of uac. every day tasks are ALL done with limited rights. only installations elevate to admin rights, and only trough the uac dialog.


    and yes, you can do what you want by starting a command line in win8, and typing "control userpasswords2" (including the 2!), then uncheck "user need to enter password to log on" and enter your password.

    then go into the energy settings, and there disable "password required after standby", and maybe remove the "lock" option for the user, too.

    after that, a admin-when-needed, limited user, that has a password when needed (networking tasks), but never asks you for it. the perfect multisystem home configuration. the one i use.
     
  4. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    This may be splitting hairs, but in any case, there's those of us for whom desktop mode is essential.

    Why would I want to do that if I can just click on a taskbar icon? The main issue with Metro is its full-screen, single-tasking metaphor. This is perfectly fine for a phone, and perhaps even for a tablet, most of the time, but it is often wildly inadequate for desktop work. I just observed myself yesterday, and it turns out that for certain tasks I regularly switch between, and partially work side-by-side within three or four applications. Doing this all in Metro would not only be a huge pain, but result in a sharp drop in productivity. It's like going back to DOS with pretty pictures, in a way.

    So, yeah, I am not trying to bash Metro in general, and perhaps things will improve with more Metro-native apps available, but there is certain work that cannot be done efficiently in Metro, in my opinion. If you don't do that kind of stuff, fine, but if you do, you need the desktop metaphor.
     
  5. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    On my DTR I am not impressed so far. At least you can still get to a normal desktop, or should I say somewhat normal...............
     
  6. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    Yes, and Microsoft needs to understand that that normal desktop is absolutely crucial for those of us who need to get their work done. Sure, those funny little entertainment apps are fine for Metro, but I have little to no use for them, let alone any of that social networking garbage.

    On the bright side, my impression is that Microsoft understands this. The upcoming version of Office is not a Metro app, of course.
     
  7. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    I think Win8 would be great on a PC with 2 and more monitors. One touch display for "Metro" environment and other, non-touch, for "classic" view. That would be awesome.
     
  8. davepermen

    davepermen Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    you're so wrong with that. but as always, change is hard. "those of us who need to get their work done" use what ever gets the job done. and in most cases, metro apps will be that. in the future. not yet. the only reason there's no metro office yet is because they are not ready themselves. most likely, it's the last desktop version.
     
  9. davepermen

    davepermen Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    it's only essential as long as it's where your apps run.


    taskbar is still there, and is obvious which is why i assumed he means apps that are NOT there.
    for the rest, well, change. hard. always. one or two years from now you will be a) understanding or b) ranting how the old days where so much better, while yourself are getting obsolete and moved away from "where the real work is".

    it's just the start, obviously. there are only few apps there now, and they're close to crap. that'll change. once the apps are on the level of their wp7 apps (mail, calendar, etc) in features, and start to surpass them, suddenly metro will not be "that toy thing", but the real place to be. complexity does not mean that something is better. it usually is useless and not what the end user (and i'm talking business end user here) really wants. you might be special. or just one who needs to embrace change instead of throwing hands in the air "no, that won't ever do for me".

    change. it's hard. especially for the geeks.
     
  10. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    No, it's essential to have the option of having multiple application windows present simultaneously. Not all tasks can be done efficiently if all we have is a "one app at a time" single-tasking paradigm.

    Don't be silly, you should be better than this. I repeat, the Metro paradigm of full-screen only apps is not always appropriate. If that's all you need, fine; for me, it's not sufficient. There's a reason why those windowing environments were developed and had so much success.

    Of course not. What you need is the ability to adapt to the task at hand. Trying to force the users into the Metro straitjacket will backfire badly. Which is, of course, not what Microsoft is trying to do. Good thing Dave Permen is not in charge of OS design decisions at Microsoft... :D

    See, those are the kind of over-generalizations with which you disqualify yourself from serious discourse. You should work on that.

    There's all sorts of users. Windows needs to cater to almost all of them.

    No. Anybody who needs to create complex content will be in the same boat as myself. If all you do is browse the web and read your email/maintain your calendar, then things are different, of course. But then you might as well use a Mac... ;)

    I know, but I am trying to watch myself carefully to try and see what changes might actually be beneficial for my work flow. I can see that certain features of the Metro interface may indeed be helpful, and there's no question that on a tablet, it's the way to go. On my "desktop" (which is, of course, driven by a laptop), things are different. Not all the time, but there's a significant portion of my work that does not fit well with the Metro that is in Windows 8.
     
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