Windows 8: The Thread

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Jayayess1190, Jun 1, 2011.

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  1. Shemmy

    Shemmy Notebook Evangelist

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    Microsoft was very late in the game regarding ISO mounting. I'm glad it's finally a native feature.

    Regarding the start screen, for the countless people who have the mindset of "if it isn't on my desktop, it isn't installed," the start screen is likely to be very useful. You wouldn't imagine (or maybe you would) the number of calls I've fielded from end users claiming an application or file is missing because there is no desktop shortcut.

    I personally find that the start screen can be useful either as a launcher (how I used to have it configured) or as a place for quick information (how I have it set up now).
     
  2. ratchetnclank

    ratchetnclank Notebook Deity

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    Im using windows 8 enterprise RTM and i really like it. The start screen is a bit stupid at times but the live tiles are a nice addition.

    I like all the small features such as the new task manager, and file transfer rates/resuming.

    Once i learnt windows key + x all issues i had with win 8 became no existent tbh.

    And finally decent multimonitor support in regards to the taskbar.
     
  3. bjammin

    bjammin Notebook Consultant

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    I love all the good stuff in Windows 8 listed above. I barely use the start screen thingy - if I want to launch anything I hit WINDOWS-Q and start typing the name of the app. It's much quicker than looking through the start menu.

    For the newby user, that WINDOWS-Q screen is an exact representation of the old start menu, so you can always find stuff there.

    As far as the start screen and full screen apps go, I am happy to ignore them for now. But I like that one day when I finally have an awesome hybrid tablet/laptop the OS will support both methods of interacting with it. There is no progress without a little bit of pain, or at least inconvenience!
     
  4. HLdan

    HLdan Notebook Virtuoso

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    I disagree wholeheartedly with this. Think about this realistically. The average customer which represents the majority of computer users will not be trying to run apps from their tablet on their desktop computer. Yes, it's nice that you can do this (I was unaware you could) but "Competitive Advantage"? No way. That's way past a major stretch to say the least. That's the same thing as saying Windows machines have a competitive advantage over Macs because they tend to offer better specs for less money when the average Joe doesn't give a rats fanny about an Ivy Bridge processor.

    A real competitive advantage is something the end user CAN and WILL take advantage of such as cloud integration between their cell phone, tablet, portable music player and desktop computer and all of that puts Apple at a competitive advantage due to the ecosystem. Being able to turn on your Mac and play music from your music library then pick up your iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch and play that same music and use the same files between all of them is a competitive advantage.

    I've not only taken a good look at Windows 8 on Microsoft's website I have also downloaded it and played with it. Microsoft is putting too much emphasis on Metro (AKA Windows 8 UI :rolleyes:) and not a whole lot else for the end user in terms of productivity so they are trying to sell a "pretty face" which is the same as putting lipstick on a pig. The Metro UI should've just been used only for the Surface as Apple has iOS. My stepmother needs a new PC notebook and she will buy it after Windows 8 gets released. She will be calling me on the phone bugging me on how to use it. I'm not spending 5 minutes trying to tell her how to navigate through that hot mess.
     
  5. bjammin

    bjammin Notebook Consultant

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    No. These devices are becoming far more intertwined. Soon there will be a very blurry line between tablets and laptops.

    Apple is also moving in this direction with OSX, but they are way behind, and are stuck with iOS on their mobile devices. I don't get any sense of using the same OS when using an iPad and Macbook. Apple has actually started to try and make OSX look like iOS which is ludicrous given how much iOS is already showing it's age.

    What we have with Windows 8 is the opportunity for a fully integrated, multi platform operating system that accentuates the strengths of the systems it runs on (desktop, laptop, tablet, phone).

    Perhaps a boot straight to desktop option in Windows 8 would be nice, but it's only one click and then you're free to ignore the metro stuff if it doesn't suit your current device / task. I'm sure that aspect will get smoother over time, but you have to start somewhere and I applaud the boldness.
     
  6. ratchetnclank

    ratchetnclank Notebook Deity

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    I do hate the way computers are moving to consumption devices.

    A PC can create and make whatever you want, tablets are just meant for consumption.

    Therefore tablets will never fully replace a notebook/desktop.
     
  7. bjammin

    bjammin Notebook Consultant

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    I create content on a tablet all the time... posting in forums, writing emails etc. With a device that could effortlessly switch between tablet and laptop mode I'd do it even more as there's no denying a real keyboard is vastly superior.

    Do you really make conscious decisions about whether you are going to create or consume content, and then select a notebook or a tablet to use? No, things aren't that black & white most of the time.
     
  8. ratchetnclank

    ratchetnclank Notebook Deity

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    What i mean is the OS limits what you can create on tablets.

    On windows i can install visual studio and develop applications, install photoshop and create art or design websites.

    On an iPad you cannot do any of the above or on an android tablet. You cannot even do this on Windows RT.

    Thats what i mean by a consumption device. x86 devices allow creation whereas ARM based devices due to the OS limitations do not.
     
  9. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    Why can't devices like the Samsung ATIV tablet/laptops and Sony Vaio Duo 11 fit both those roles? Those are both x86 devices, but this will also apply to a certain extent to Windows 8 RT on equivalent ARM devices.

    If you're only going to watch movies one day because you're on the go, take just the tablet half and it works very well as a "consumption" device. If you're going to work on a paper the next day, bring the tablet and keyboard dock for a full-featured ultraportable laptop.

    As for applications, Office 2013 RT will be landing some time in January, with a preview edition installed at launch. I'd bet that Adobe will have a Photoshop version for Windows 8 RT soon enough, particularly if sales go well.

    Sounds to me (and my dad) that this could certainly replace my laptop.
     
  10. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    This. This fall, I'm going to switch from a desktop-replacement laptop to an x86 convertible tablet as my main device. For reviewing lengthy transcripts and for legal research, an on-screen two-thumb keyboard is perfectly adequate and the tablet form factor is refreshing (I can walk around while I work, which is better both health-wise and attention-span-wise than sitting at a desk for hours). When it's time to bang out a memo or a motion, I snap on the keyboard and have at it. The same is true on the recreation side: keyboard detached for web browsing and TV-show watching; keyboard attached for forums and email.

    A no-keyboard-at-all tablet with a mobile OS couldn't be my main machine, but a convertible tablet with Windows 8? Absolutely. For me, one OS with a blurred line between laptop and tablet is much better than two ecosystems with separate OSes (I currently switch between an iPad 1 and Kindle Fire as dedicated tablets and a Vaio F2 as a dedicated laptop). I've mulled over the Thinkpad Tablet S, the HP Envy X2, and the Sony Vaio Duo 11. Will probably go Envy X2 for the long battery life (Atom processor instead of Ivy Bridge) and well-executed keyboard docking solution (it's a full ultraportable laptop when docked, including trackpad, screen hinge, and multiple USB ports).
     
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