Windows 10

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by WhatsThePoint, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. Raiderman

    Raiderman Notebook Deity

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  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    If you don't mind, please update us about your experience with it.
     
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  3. lerina desoza

    lerina desoza Newbie

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    According to me...
    This is suitable to handle and performs easily
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The One Year Anniversary of the Microsoft dropping of support for anything but Windows 10 on new CPU's...do you remember? :)

    From 25% in 2017 to 29% marketshare for Windows 10 in 13 months... while Windows 7 has dropped from 50% to 44%. Video has % back then, here are current numbers.

    Microsoft Drops Windows 7/8.1 Support for AMD Ryzen & Intel Kaby Lake CPU & Lies About It - BUSTED!
    Barnacules Nerdgasm
    Published on Mar 16, 2017
    Today Microsoft officially stated that it won't allow Windows Updates on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 if you have an AMD Ryzen or Intel Kaby Lake or newer CPU. They claim the dropped support is for stability and reliability but I cut through the crap as an ex-Microsoft employee and tell you why they are really doing it. Comes down to Windows 10 market share and spying, plain and simple.
    ** UPDATE 4/19/17 **
    Looks like I'm proven right by this article that shows a user made patch that allows the updates you wouldn't get to install on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 and they work just fine proving that Microsoft is a LIAR!
    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news...


    And, cranking the way back machine all the way back to 2015...

    Prevent Windows 10 Spying On You, Privacy & Security Matter!
    Barnacules Nerdgasm
    Published on Nov 20, 2015
    In this version episode of #TechTip I show you how to disable all of the spying features of Windows 10 and get your privacy back. I think Windows 10 is a great operating system once you disable all the data gathering mechanisms and return it back to a pure operating system.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
  5. Raiderman

    Raiderman Notebook Deity

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    Thankfully I dont use the service of windows update, and only rely on simplix for security updates. The strong arming crap has to set off internal alarms, DOESN'T it? Never before has Microsoft resorted to these tactics, and there is only one reason. That reason is advertising dollars, not security, nor compatibility, just plain old dollars and cents. It's simple math, windows 7 does not have the android style advertising or crappy store app notifications that Windows 10 has. I dont want that filth on my PC, as I deal with it enough on my phone, which is basically what windows 10 is, a phone OS.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
     
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  6. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Windows 10 April 2018 Update - Timeline
     
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  7. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Windows 10 April 2018 Update: A cheat sheet
    Everything you need to know about the latest major feature update to Windows 10, including the features for home users and businesses, how to get it now and how to delay it.
     
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  8. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks!! STAHP! Dont buy FILTH...

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  9. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    This deferral process is available only on PCs running business and education editions, such as Windows 10 Pro, Windows 10 Enterprise, and Windows 10 Education. Windows 10 Home does not offer any deferral options.

    Note - I don't use Windows 10 and I haven't tried these steps, so please let us know if they work(ed). - Scott

    Windows 10 April 2018 Update: Act fast to delay this big upgrade

    "Each time Microsoft rolls out a major upgrade to Windows 10, you have the option to wait a few months before you install it on PCs running Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise. But you have to act quickly."
    By Ed Bott for The Ed Bott Report | April 27, 2018 -- 16:08 GMT (09:08 PDT)
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-spring-creators-update-act-fast-to-delay-this-big-upgrade/

    "[Note: This article has been completely revised for the latest Windows 10 feature updates. This revision covers version 1803 and was last updated 21-March-2018.]
    On April 30 Microsoft's update servers will begin delivering the Windows 10 April 18 (formerly "Spring Creators") Update, version 1803, to current installations of Windows 10 that have been running for at least 30 days.

    This is the latest feature update in Microsoft's new twice-a-year release cadence, and you should view it with the skepticism any initial public release of a new Windows version deserves. In a business setting, that typically means delaying the upgrade for a few months while you deploy the new release on a smaller number of test devices.

    This deferral process is available only on PCs running business and education editions, such as Windows 10 Pro, Windows 10 Enterprise, and Windows 10 Education. Windows 10 Home does not offer any deferral options.

    Over the course of several feature updates since the initial release of Windows 10 in 2015, Microsoft has tinkered with the interface for deferring feature updates. The steps I describe here assume that you have already installed the Creators Update, version 1709.

    The good news is that you no longer have to mess with Group Policy settings to defer updates on a standalone PC. Instead, you can take your choice of three options, all available in the Windows 10 Settings app.

    Go to Settings > Update & security > Advanced options to see all three options, which I have labeled in the screenshot on this page.

    Option 1 allows you to choose a servicing channel (previously called a branch). The default setting is Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted), which corresponds to what was previously known as the Current Branch.

    You can change this setting to Semi-Annual Channel (the new name for what was previously known as Current Branch for Business, as shown here. That defers feature updates until Microsoft declares them "ready for business deployment," a milestone that typically occurs about four months after the initial release.

    Option 2 allows you to specify additional time after the official release to the channel you selected. You can delay the upgrade by up to an additional 365 days from its initial release date; in the example shown here, I've chosen a 90-day delay, which means that the 1803 feature update will not be offered to this PC until at least July 2018.

    On any PC where you choose the full 365-day deferral and have opted in to the Semi-Annual Channel, you'll be spared any feature updates until sometime in mid-2019. (Here, too, this option is available only on PCs running business and education versions of Windows 10.)

    Option 3 works independently of the feature update settings and allows you to defer the monthly cumulative security updates by up to 30 days. In this example I have chosen to delay these updates by 7 days to allow time for testing.

    To make the equivalent changes on a corporate network using Group Policy, follow a slightly different set of steps.

    Using Group Policy Editor, navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update > Windows Update for Business. Open the policy Select when Preview Builds and Feature Updates are received, set it to Enabled, and then use the controls to choose your preferred branch. The options here are identical to those in Settings.

    Just be sure to set a calendar reminder at least a week or two before the expiration date, because you won't receive any warning when the clock runs out. You'll simply see the update offered for installation, with no more options to delay or defer."
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
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