Windows 10

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by WhatsThePoint, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Linux can be a daunting voyage into computer parts previously unthought of in the "Windows context", but that is what makes UNIX / Linux so much fun :)

    You thought of one of the gotcha's I was trying to help you avoid, and yes it will blow away all your Linux partitions on your disk.

    The first thing the recovery software does is to format all the internal drives it see's - which is why you only want the original boot disk and the disk that has the recovery partition on it left in the laptop when doing a recovery restore.

    Most laptops have all the original partitions on the boot drive, but some have the recovery partition on the 2nd drive, usually a 1TB HDD these days.

    Use the Windows Disk Management snapin to the Computer Management utility to see where your recovery partition resides - usually a 20GB partition or so.

    Again, that's why I suggested using another drive instead of doing a dual boot off the Windows drive.

    You could also use a USB 3.0 fast external drive - SSD maybe? - as a Linux boot drive.

    I have used USB 3.0 fast flash drives for this as well.

    When doing a recovery restore, make sure you disconnect any USB drives and empty the optical drive before doing the restore.

    Remove the USB drives as some have reported even their USB drives getting blown away during a restore, and removing the optical disk will keep you from waiting for the disk to spin up and down during the recovery operations.
     
  2. Awhispersecho

    Awhispersecho Notebook Evangelist

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    When I first installed Mint, it was still booting straight into Windows even though I had changed the boot timeout, disabled fast startup, disabled Safe boot and changed the boot order. I then deleted the new Linux partitions and ran a boot manager repair from a windows recovery drive I made. After that I reinstalled Mint. For some reason I don't think the recovery fixed the boot manager and erased the Linux boot that was written because I still showed up in Bios under boot/windows boot loader. In addition, there now seems to be extra partitions such as a duplicate recovery partition. I assume I do a complete reset, not one that retains my files and settings.

    Yes it is kind of fun. I was genuinely excited when I figured a few things out and got Mint to boot. Downloaded a few apps for it already but do plan on starting over. If I could actually install it on a flash drive and just run it from there that might be a good option to consider.
     
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That's a good point, the restore might not re-write the boot mbr.

    You could do that yourself from a Windows installer and use the Repair System option and start a cmd window to run the commands:

    How To Use Command Prompt To Fix Issues With Your PC's Boot Records
    http://www.digitalcitizen.life/command-prompt-fix-issues-your-boot-records
     
  4. Awhispersecho

    Awhispersecho Notebook Evangelist

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    So do I have to run all of them of just the first (/fixmbr)? I actually ran a boot loader repair like that from a Win 10 ISO which is why I find it strange I have so many partitions on my drive now. It said it completed successfully.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The partitions need to be deleted separately - the MBR re-write is like really small - literally 1 sector, or 1 record :)

    Boot sector
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_sector

    Master boot record
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record

    Here is another article, maybe it will help to see it described from another viewpoint:
    http://www.thewindowsclub.com/repair-master-boot-record-mbr-windows

    Read through the whole thing, backing up as directed, and read over the followon commands and get a good idea of the whole process before moving forward.

    I don't run into problems very often, but when I do and I don't have a Windows disk - easier now with downloadable flash/optical boot option, I used Linux Live CD/flash boot to massage partitions and boot for Windows shared disks.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=fix...rome..69i57.3644j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
     
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Here is a recent example of why you don't want to use dual boot Linux / Windows - it is fragile and can be lost easily during a Windows update or Linux update.

    Fix: Windows 10 Anniversary Update destroys boot loader in dual-boot config
    http://windowsreport.com/anniversary-update-destroys-boot-loader-dual-boot-config/

    "If you’re running a dual-boot system, you should think twice before installing the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. Users are reporting that Windows doesn’t boot after Windows 10 version 1607 is installed, as their computers simply display an error message informing them the file system is unknown.

    According to user reports, after the download is completed, Windows doesn’t boot in the first re-boot phase. Instead, a message appears, informing users the system is going to enter the GRUB rescue mode:
    error: unknown filesystem.
    Entering rescue mode …
    grub rescue>

    At the end of the process, the GRUB rescue utility lists the partitions, but shows them all as “unknown filesystem”. Many users would rush in to say it’s normal to have this error message since Linux and GRUB Boot Loader are not supported in dual boot configurations with Windows. In reality, many users have been running Grub with Linux and Windows for years."

    And, accidental mishaps are common when running as root when you are a newbie, you don't know which end of the shell to point where, and you can shoot yourself in the foot very easily. :D
     
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  7. Awhispersecho

    Awhispersecho Notebook Evangelist

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    Only the Linux partitions allow me to delete them. The new duplicate recovery partition does not give me access to do anything. I used to have Windows, recovery and another small partition before Linux, now I have windows, recovery, another recovery the exact same size, and 2 very small partitions before Linux. That's after deleting the Linux partitions and expanding the original Windows partition back to what it was and running the windows boot repair. I still end up with the 5 partitions instead of the 3 I originally had. Also, I did see the issue with major Windows updates screwing things up. But I figure we are another 5 months from the next major update. I will look through everything else in a bit.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Even a minor update from MS can fsck things up ;)

    The Windows partitions are protected, you need to use a tool to unmark them as protected, then you can delete them.

    Under Windows use diskpart:

    How to delete a protected EFI disk partition with Windows 7, 8, or Windows 10
    http://www.winability.com/delete-protected-efi-disk-partition/

    or

    How to Remove an EFI System Partition or GPT Protective Partition From a Drive in Windows
    http://www.howtogeek.com/215349/how...protective-partition-from-a-drive-in-windows/

    or

    Can't delete extra "Healthy (Recovery Partition)"s and "Healthy (EFI System Partition)"
    https://social.technet.microsoft.co...thy-efi-system-partition?forum=w8itproinstall

    There are many ways on Linux, gdisk is user friendly:
    http://www.rodsbooks.com/gdisk/walkthrough.html

    fixparts is a gdisk derived tool that's even more user friendly:
    http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/
     
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  9. Awhispersecho

    Awhispersecho Notebook Evangelist

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    Deleted partitions and repaired the boot manager. Checked the links out , found some on my own then did my own thing through command prompt. I have a few extra screws left over but no big deal right :) reinstalling Windows now and trying to decide if I am going to do a straight install or completely hack it to disable most of it's "features". We will see. Thanks all.
     
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  10. James D

    James D Notebook Prophet

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    [​IMG]

    This is canonical how IBM jumps from PC to MAC. They see where Win10 is coming.
     
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