Windows 10 Drivers [M18xR2]

Discussion in 'Alienware 18 and M18x' started by Homer S, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    The MSI has a TDP of 115w.

    The issue is that they arent spread out like they are on traditional MXM 3.0b styled cards so the heat builds up quicker in a solid line.

    I attach some memory mosfet heatsinks and resolved the power throttling on my machine, but will have to modify further if I want to actually overclock the card.
     
  2. MagicMike

    MagicMike Notebook Consultant

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    Right, so do you suspect the throttling comes from the vrm heating up too much?

    Also, doesnt lower TDP mean lower performance? I think my MSI 1070 goes over 115W in gaming, reaching 135W easily, so TDP isn't the max power draw then?

    Thanks
     
  3. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Just means lower power allowance which generally translates to that
     
  4. Homer S

    Homer S Notebook Consultant

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    The heat sink comes with TIM to bring some components up to the level of the heat sink. Should I replace this will some better ones? Also, I'm going with this kit for the CPU and GPU.

    Homer
     
  5. MagicMike

    MagicMike Notebook Consultant

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    Please share your experience with these liquid metal pads, would be interested to see what the temperature drop is with them.
     
  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I think @Raidriar had a good experience with the Liquid Metal Pad. Fit has to be flawless for it to work properly. I tried using it several times with poor results, but I suspect that was due to less than excellent contact. It cannot be used to fill gaps or imperfections. Neither can liquid metal, but the pad even less so because it is extremely thin. If it is not making contact evenly across the surface of the die it will not work. Assembling things correctly and following the correct crisscross screw tightening sequence could also affect fitment in a more exaggerated manner than it normally would.
     
  7. MagicMike

    MagicMike Notebook Consultant

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    I couldn't find any decent reviews of those pads on YT, but it doesnt seem to be a new product...

    Would stacking two layers work better? Apparently it melts so wouldn't that mean that it would adapt to the gap and make full contact?
     
  8. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I tried stacking them and it made no difference. If it doesn't make proper contact it cannot melt properly. I could never get them to melt properly. They would only melt in the tightest spots where there was direct metal-to-metal contact with solid pressure, and the rest of the pad remained unaffected and totally useless.

    These pads are thinner than a sheet of plastic food wrap, and so light that the mere breath from your nostrils can blow them out of your hand. So, there's no extra material to flow into areas where tolerances are anything less than excellent. It needs to be a very precision fit, nearly machined tolerance, in order to work well. Even some of the best built laptops are lacking in this area. Those that use a unified heat sink design are even less likely to work well, because they are not built with aerospace precision. Finding success would be much easier on a desktop using a CPU water block or something similar.

    That said, if you're lucky enough to have a laptop with heat sinks that fit much better than normal (an anomaly) they definitely have potential to work fantastic.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2019
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  9. Homer S

    Homer S Notebook Consultant

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    I already have it so I'll give it a go or two. I have a new heat sink and a new GPU. I'll give it a good clean and see what happens. How do I know it is not working?

    The other part is the "burn in" where you have to get the film up to 58-60C in order to melt the first time.

    Homer
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2019
  10. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    It worked well for the GPU, it did not work well for the CPU. I had to revert to liquid ultra on the CPU to get my performance back. It worked well at stock speeds but start overclocking and it wasn’t conductive enough.
     
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