Will Dual Core / Low Voltage CPUs catch up to older Quad Core CPUs?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by moviemarketing, Mar 9, 2016.

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  1. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    Mobile quad core CPUs from a couple generations back seem to be fast enough to handle most modern games and demanding applications. Not nearly as powerful as the latest desktop CPUs, but good enough for most usage scenarios.

    At what point do you imagine dual core and low voltage mobile processors will catch up to, say the level of a Haswell or Ivy Bridge quad core i7 mobile CPU? And how about SoC, will they ever reach that level?
     
  2. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    Of course they will reach that level in due time, but not anytime soon. Seeing as how a variety of skylake quads and dual still get spanked by the sandy bridge counter parts (in the mobile sector), it will be a while until LV and ULV CPUs catch up, mainly due to how Intel designs these chips. They turbo cannot run indefinitely like it can on standard voltage chips, and what is worse, is the push for slimmer/quite/fanless laptops makes things even worse.

    most every laptop these days, except for high end, has a "U" suffix attached to it, which is great for battery life, but not for performance.
     
  3. Starlight5

    Starlight5 W I N T E R B O R N

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    I believe dual-core ulvs should match QX9300 soon, if they didn't yet. Sandy Bridge and above is completely different story, though.
     
  4. djembe

    djembe drum while you work

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    According to Passmark, current Skylake ULV i7 processors meet or exceed the i7-940XM. However, Sandy Bridge and more recent quad-cores will likely not be surpassed for a few more years.
     
  5. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    You can't bench against an extreme edition, because they are almost always overclocked way past what they are rated. My 920XM was rated 2.0Ghz 4 cores.....except it did 3.46ghz on 4 cores. Big difference there. Same with the 2920XM I have, rated for 3.5ghz turbo single core, but will actually due 4.2Ghz 4 core with no added voltage....
     
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  6. djembe

    djembe drum while you work

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    You're making my point for me. As the i7-940XM was the most powerful Clarksfield processor (and capable of higher performance through overclocking), the fact that current generation dual-core low voltage processors beat it in the same benchmarks clearly show that they meet or exceed that generation of mobile quad-core processors.

    However, the best result I found for a Skylake ULV dual-core was still lower than the lowest result I found for a mobile Sandy Bridge quad-core (regular, not extreme). Which confirms that current dual-cores cannot yet match Sandy Bridge and later quad-cores.
     
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  7. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    SoC's will reach that level soon enough; but when they do, we'll have long forgotten what it was like to use such primitive levels of hardware in our notebooks (and actually get anything done with them). This is inevitable; only time is required.

    Dual core models are not and never will be comparable to 'real' QC platforms like Haswell and IB. This may never change (at least not quickly enough to be able to point it out from one generation to another).

    But the next couple of iterations that Intel will do with comparable QC platforms (not low voltage) will exceed what those systems enjoy today; superior performance. With any luck, not only will performance be better than what we have today, but we'll also get other features and benefits that we can't image as of now.

    Progress is constant. Anyone that thinks differently will be left behind in short order.

    The other side of the coin is that any single aspect of 'performance' is not an absolute measure either. Especially in mobile computing. Many competing directions and needs from a varied base of users. 'Better' will be the sum of the parts, not a single 'score' held high as an indication of what little progress has happened so far...

    When a low voltage part has surpassed a current Haswell or IB QC i7; that comparison will be moot. Because the i7's QC's or higher of that future generation will make it seem like we are using 1970's calculators for computers today. ;)



     
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  8. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    Are you talking about stock clocks here? Nehalem was really low clocked, especially the quads. But like I said, the extremes will always be a class of their own because nobody runs them stock, and they're capable of so much more. All other nehalem mobiles would make sense.
     
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  9. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    Although it seems certain that usage needs will grow over a long period of time, it's not exactly a bell curve. We have had a rather long run recently where usage needs for the typical consumer have not increased at all, and usage needs for professional/creative users have not increased very much.

    Consider some common demanding creative applications that benefit from quad core i7 CPU like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator etc. During the past six years, some of the Adobe applications have become better optimized and are now less demanding than they were when CS5 released back in 2010. In other words, the latest 2016 software is running faster, even on the older hardware.

    If dual core ULV or SoC catch up with the Sandy Bridge mobile QC in the next few years, perhaps that will be fast enough for a segment of laptop buyers that previously might have considered only quad core i7 CPU, no?
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2016
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