Will China kill volvo?

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by MAA83, Feb 19, 2010.

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  1. Trottel

    Trottel Notebook Virtuoso

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    In general, being cheap or looking expensive and impressive are far more important to Chinese consumers and businesses than safety. It's like that in a lot of poor or developing countries.
     
  2. MAA83

    MAA83 Notebook Evangelist

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    I can see how different places have different degrees of expectation when it comes to safety.
     
  3. Razor2

    Razor2 Notebook Deity

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    The sale of Volvo is quite unfortunate, but if Ford wants to kill it self, just get on with it.
    In the EU people are even more safety minded than in the US, so most of the loyal Volvo buyers will buy something else, like BMW or MB, because they are not even trusting a Volvo which is financed by the Chinese.
    As sales drop Volvo will slowly but surely change into some Chinese cheap car brand for the masses.

    The main problem with this sale is however far bigger...if that happens, Geely will have all the current Ford technology (from Volvos have very much common with EU Fords, which are quite on par with any European car, in terms of technology), and will start to sell cheap cars with the technology for fracture of the Ford price in the US. Now imagine how many Americans will buy Ford...
    So to sum it up, Ford shoots itself in the foot with this sale and will go bust in 5-10 years globally!
     
  4. EntityX

    EntityX Notebook Evangelist

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    Trust me as someone who currently works and lives in China, safety considerations can be a cultural. For example almost all drivers never wear seat belts and a lot of scientists that work in my company are reckless about safety precautions and choose not to wear protective gear, even though there are consequences. You could argue that the tendency to not follow safety in China is a lack of education on the topic, but I would argue back that its cultural.
     
  5. allfiredup

    allfiredup Notebook Virtuoso

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    Cars manufactured by Chinese companies aren't built to the quality standards we expect her in North America, at least not with any consistency. But South Korean imports varied from mediocre to abysmal when they first appeared in the U.S. market in 1986. By sheer luck, a far crappier import from Eastern Europe (YUGO) deflected much of the negative attention from their less crappy cars for a few years while they improved. Now it's 24 years later, and that South Korean company (Hyundai) is ranked third in reliability and quality by Consumer Reports, behind only Honda and Subaru. Hopefully the Chinese auto industry will follow Hyundai's example.

    As for Volvo's future, I don't think there will be any drastic changes any time soon. They'll just keep producing the cars they're making now and any new ones already in the pipeline. I've also read that they plan to keep producing all cars for the North American and European markets in the existing factories located in Sweden and Belgium.

    The general perception seems to be that Volvos are bullet-proof tanks in terms of safety and reliability. That was an accurate description of Volvo 20 years ago, but the competition has caught up and Volvo just doesn't make 'em like they used to. A 2008 Honda Accord has better overall crash test results than the 2008 Volvo S60. And starting back in 1992 with the Volvo 850, reliability has been spotty on new models and declines sharply around the 5-6 year or 90-100k mile mark. Transmission failures have plagued numerous models and even a Volvo service department admits that anything over 100,000 miles is "gravy" even on the high-dollar S80! Another weak spot is the turbochargers that Volvo uses in the vast majority of their vehicles. Most owners have no clue how to properly care for them (especially letting the car run for several minutes after any hard acceleration to let the turbocharger properly cool). They can fail at 50k miles even though they're designed to last double that.

    Volvos used to be mechanically simple bricks built to endure the harsh Scandinavian climate and protect everyone inside of it. They cared about safety long before anyone else did and they're responsible for a lot of safety technology that is common in every vehicle now (3-point seatbelts, side airbags). But as their cars became more complex and the competition caught up, they lost their edge (literally and figuratively)....
     
  6. AmazingGracePlayer

    AmazingGracePlayer Notebook Deity

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    I don't think China will kill Volvo. I've lived in China till I was a teen and I can safely say that Chinese people worship Volvo. They think that Volvo is as luxurious as Audi 8's, BMW 7's, and Benz E/S's... If anything they will better it; there's really no reason for China to downgrade the car (namely the safety features, as all of you have mentioned). Just my 2 cents.
     
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