Wifi Connection Really Bad On One Floor?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Drew1, May 14, 2021.

  1. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    It's possible but, you won't know until you try.

    N = ANCIENT
    AC = Grandfather
    AX = young adult

    Reviews are one thing and experience is another. If you want to waste money on AC now and pay for AX later for virtually the same price go for it. If you want a smoother experience as you upgrade to newer devices, better range, and speeds then AX is your friend.

    Then hook up the CM to an outlet on the 1st floor and put the router there. Chances are you'll have pretty good coverage to all 3 floors. If you find it to be weak then look into adding a 2nd WIFI to the mix like we've been discussing.

    There's no special COAX when it comes to hooking up a CM. The modem will work on any outlet that has a clean signal on it. The less amount of splitters between the modem and the TAP where the cable comes in provides the best speed / reliability.
     
  2. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Hey. Well the thing is that ac2600 has very good reviews on RANGE. When i look at the AX1800, there are good reviews but not that many on the range compared to that one. Also the Ax one seem to be called a budget wifi 6 router as well.


    Also you say eventually you have to pay for AX later. Someone said they are in IT and uses this one and it covers their whole three story house and said don't go after new technology because it isn't necessary.


    Also to confirm, you are l00 percent against any mesh system right? Like the TP Deco, google nest, eerie etc?
     
  3. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    Listen.... I'm CCNP certified and do networking for a a living. I've also taken the CCIE exam as well.

    Take it from a It person that doesn't specialize in networking or from someone that does it day in/out and not dealing with "users". I deal with pieces of equipment that cost 7 figures not desktop PC's or phone issues.

    AX is what new devices are coming out with installed in them.
    AX isn't 10-20 years old.

    RANGE = 2.4ghz band which is covered by anything since 802.11B
    2.4ghz band has had improvements with each iteration post B -> G -> N -> AC -> AX
    2.4ghz used to only get you 11mbps and now with advanced chipsets on AX goes to 600mbps which is just below the max of AC (5ghz) at 866mbps yet the AX 5ghz band can in real world get to 1.3gbps

    MESH is a cheap way to half ass your network while you figure out the proper way to do it. If you want crappy performance go for MESH / Extenders / whatever you want to call them.

    While using you N router as an AP in the basement isn't ideal it's 1000% better than dealing with these other options.
     
  4. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Okay... so i decided to buy the tp link ac2600 as oppose to the AX1800. Yes i know you advised on the AX... but there were so many reviews on range on the ac2600... that i had to go with that one... They did not open the box yet though.


    The other thing is this. Im not in that house now so i have to help them set this up via over the iphone to someone that is not tech savy.


    Do you basically just unplug the old netgear n600 router out... then plug it in... and power it on... and thats it? Then check for the wifi network connection name... which would be on the router... then type in that password... and thats all that is needed to connect to the wifi? Again, its been a long time since i set up a new router. But the issue here is i don't have physical access to that router so helping them do the installation over the phone.


    I did see this link on youtube to set it up







    So no computer is needed for the setup? You just can use your iphone or computer and log in to the network and password and thats all? I know there is that 192.168.0.1 thing... but thats only if you want to change the network name and password right?


    What also is bit confusing is why does the ac2600 the box shows 3 antennas but in the video there is 4 antennas?


    Then once its set up, go around different areas and check to see the mbps in every area?
     
  5. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    Basically you need to power everything off as the CM will need to clear the MAC of the N router from it's DB to issue a new IP to the new router.
    Plugin in the CM first, let it sync up, then plug in the router.
    Follow the directions to get connected / run the configuration wizard to setup the SSID / Password to what the N had configured to ease every other device in connecting. Check for FW updates for security performance.

    Grab a WIFI signal app for polling the signal strength around the house.
     
  6. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    The only thing right now is im not sure if i have a bit of buyers remorse or not. gain i bought the ac2600 router over the axl800 router because so many reviews on RANGE. But when i look at the extenders, why is it the ac2600 so expensive? Its almost l00 dollars or so. But the axl800 is about 35 dollars.



    Would that powerline adapter you mentioned earlier

    would this be also compatible with the ac2600?


    https://www.amazon.com/Powerline-Et...powerline&qid=1626835537&s=electronics&sr=1-3


    Thing is we still havent opened the box yet because they dont have the time to set up the router yet. So now im a bit contemplating if we should keep it or not. But you say just keep this one as oppose to the axl800 right? Again we havent opened the box yet.
     
  7. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    The power line adapter is a conduit for Ethernet. It's compatible with anything Ethernet.

    I advised you to go AX because it performs better in transmitting data vs AC.

    If you're second guessing yourself then that's a good reason to go with the advice you were given. I gave you a solution that would work best for your budget.
     
  8. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Yes i am second guessing, but i think i will still stick with the ac2600 as oppose to returning it and buying the axl800. Again i havent opened the box yet... but for some reason i think the range of the ac2600 is probably better.


    Also other people mention if you dont have any wifi 6 devices... this wifi l800x isn't going to do anything. So are they wrong about this or not? Again we only have one device that has wifi 6. But you say it transmit data better vs AC... but what if all your devices are not wifi 6?
     
  9. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    I have a mix of devices and see a boost in performance across the board. Primarily my phone / laptop are 6 and everything else is 5 and the stupid cheap printer only works on 2.4ghz otherwise I would simply shutoff that band.

    [​IMG]

    Every iteration of WIFI adds to the existing version it's replacing / improving upon.

    802.11B -> 802.11N -> 802.11AC -> 802.11AX
    All have a 2.4ghz band
    802.11A was the first release for 5ghz and was primarily an Enterprise only setup initially as most consumer HW didn't incorporate it as an option until N was released.

    In the table you'll see the indoor distance listed but, it's not totally accurate as you see the huge difference between N & AC/AX but, considering all 3 of them offer 2.4ghz channels they're all equal but, the difference is in how AX handles speed of 2.4 vs N/AC being that it has a higher throughput.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

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    Link rate alone is not very meaningful, I’d say realworld average of AX over AC is like 5-10% (ie R7800 vs RAX80 (both limited by gigabit port)), with maybe at best 20% for a few. 1024 QAM is far more sensitive to noise.

    And yes you can have improvements of AC performance on newer AX chipsets even with AX disabled due to newer improved chipsets in general, not necessarily from the AX spec itself. This I say from experience testing multiple high end routers, between AX/AC mode not a big difference in most cases on the same router.

    And 6Ghz is not as performant at the moment at equivalent distances as 5Ghz till FCC increases output. This has also been my experience in actual 6Ghz testing during a beta test….

    Real benefits of AX are doubling of 2.4 GHz performance on HT20. Still don’t recommend HT40 as it’s more susceptible to interfere and neighbor unfriendly. The other main reason to get AX in the future would be better sharing of spectrum especially in large/congested office environments with stuff like BSS coloring and also power saving with target wake time etc but a lot of that stuff wasn’t even properly functional on early AX routers, which were essentially somewhere between AX and AC feature set wise.


    Now having said all that, If one has a choice between equivalent antenna AX vs AC device at close to similar prices or even if the AX is a little bit more expensive I’d recommend the AX as you’d likely get longer term support vs a product closer to late stage of its life cycle. At the same time I wouldn’t replace a 4x4 R7800 (AC2600) with a 2x2 RAX30 (AX3000)….

    Also I would not buy any router that’s less than a 6 months to a year old as you’d essentially be a guinea pig.. while the router companies get things straightened out.


    You bought what you bought and it isn’t bad so stop second guessing and move on.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2021
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