Wifi Connection Really Bad On One Floor?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Drew1, May 14, 2021.

  1. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    Right now your biggest impediment is your N router that caps you at 100mbps. This should be priority one since you're paying for 300mbps of service. You're basically paying 300% more per month than what you're able to use. which

    MESH = band aid for poor coverage / lower speeds as it 1/2's the speed in most cases to provide backhaul to the base station

    If you don't want to run Ethernet from one level to another your other option is power line adapters @ ~$45/set which would allow 1gbps over your household power lines back to the router.

    If you used the PL adapter I would probably position a higher power AP on your main floor that you use WIFI on and then put the router in the basement to create a WFI sandwich for the 1st floor in between. Setting the WIFI channels opposing as in 36-52 on one floor and 100-?? on the other floor. Devices should pick up different options depending on strength for optimal speed and stability.

    If you go back to my one recommendation on a simple router w/ 4-5 ports and no WIFI and then add 2 x AP's to it w/ the power line adapter you shouldn't have to buy any other networking gear for a very long time w/ very good coverage and speed.

    #12

    PL kit $45
     
  2. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Hey. Yea the old netgear n600 router has the max limit of 100mbps. We are actually paying for 200mbps now... not 300mbps, But yea we are playing double more per month that what we can use.


    Your statement on mesh... you are saying you will lose half the speed that you get normally? So if you pay for 200mbps, you going to get half that only on wifi? But if wired, you will get pretty close to that... is that accurate? If that is the case, doesn't that mean mesh just isn't good then? I mean it solves the wifi coverage but you lose half the speed? On this other forum i posted this question on, almost everyone say get mesh and getting a wireless router and/or extender is stupid. They all seem to be for mesh because its a two story house and basement etc.

    The thing is at the moment, nobody uses a wired ethernet connection on the second floor where the modem and router is at the moment. I mean sometime in the future maybe, but right now a wired ethernet connection isn't necessary.



    So your suggest is buy that TP Link AX1800

    Then also buy the TP-Link AV1000 Powerline Starter Kit ?



    The thing is at the moment, nobody uses a wired ethernet connection on the second floor where the modem and router is at the moment. I mean sometime in the future maybe, but right now a wired ethernet connection isn't necessary.


     
  3. Tech Junky

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    The purpose of the starter kit is to have something for an additional AP or putting your N router into bridge mode as an AP.

    MESH takes say your 1gbps port and cuts the bandwidth in 1/2. 1/2 is used for transmit / receive.

    There's a small handful of pods that don't do this but, in most cases you need to hardwire them to get full internal LAN bandwidth.

    MESH is a marketing term for adding additional WIFI points to an existing network. Taking the cheapest solutions for idiots yields the worst possible bandwidth due to how they operate. If you do things properly with an AP or reuse a router as an extension you get the full potential in the 2nd area of the space. In your case reusing the N router in AP mode would yield 100mbps in that area of the house due to the port limitation being 100mbps. If you got a 2nd newer WIFI AP / Router and connected it through the starter kit you could get 1gbps speed internally if you're hosting shared files on a PC somewhere on the network. If you're just concerned with basic connectivity using the N should suffice. The other option would be adding a gbps switch before plugging the N into the powerline adapter to allow for additional jacks for devices to plug into like TV / Stereo / Streaming / etc.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2021
  4. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    The modem and router is on the second floor. That is where optimum online installed it years ago. So we cannot move the modem/wireless router to another floor etc.


    So get that TP Link AX1800 wireless router and put it on second floor. See how the signal is on the first floor and basement right? Because the signal might be strong enough all the way to the basement even without extender?



    And if there is any signal issue in the basement, then buy the powerline starter kit you listed? I see there are two of them. So both of those would go on the first floor and basement? Again, i doubt there would be any signal issue on the first floor, but if any signal issue it would be in basement.



    But what about the tp link extenders though? So those aren't needed? I'm still confused with the powerline thing you mention. Thats if you need ethernet connection though right?



    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Exte...ywords=tp+link+extender&qid=1626560150&sr=8-7

    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-AC12...ywords=tp+link+extender&qid=1626560150&sr=8-4

    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-AC75...ywords=tp+link+extender&qid=1626560150&sr=8-2


    Covers Up to 1500 Sq.ft and 25 Devices, Up to 1200Mbp.


    The thing with these wireless extenders... i see some cover that much square feet and some less less square feet and speed like up to

    Covers Up to 1200 Sq.ft and 20 Devices, Up to 750Mbps Dual Band WiFi Range Extender,



    I mean if i buy this, extender is going to be in the basement most likely and not the first floor right? But obviously pay more for the more expensive one that covers more square feet and speed even though the basement is only 750 square feet?


    But if i buy one of these tp link extenders and put in basement, can i get wired ethernet connection from it though? Like if you connect ethernet cable from laptop in the basement to the tp link extender in the basement right next to each other?
     
  5. Tech Junky

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    Sure you can if you have a jack to plug it into. Figure out which one and remove any splitters for the best signal / speed on the CM.

    If you move the CM to the 1st floor your WIFI might be strong enough with a single router instead of adding an additional or reusing the N.

    No, there's a base unit that connects wherever you put the router. The additional one plugs in where you want a new "jack".

    Not needed if you reuse the N for the basement if needed.

    Depends on how the port is configured. it could allow a connection to the router for faster speeds or it could be configured as an uplink that will transmit as RF back tot he base node / router.
     
  6. Tech Junky

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    To keep it simple.....

    Get the AX1800, power extender kit, and reuse the N router in AP mode. ~$150 least technical deployment from running cable / configuring multiple devices.
     
  7. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    What do you mean if you have a jack to plug it into? The cable modem is on the second floor. The router is next to it. You connect an ethernet cable from the router to the modem right? The thing is im not at the house right now so i cannot see how it is. But i recall that is how its suppose to be? Thus modem and router are always next to each other?


    What does CM mean? You use a lot of abbreviations and many times i dont know how that means...


    Do you have any opinion on this tp link router? I asked this on another forum and someone said they have this and it works great on their three story house and 2400 square foot. I then checked the reviews and lot of people mention it has really good range... which to me is the most important thing here. Price is about the same as its like 5 dollars more. This uses wifi 5 but i dont care about that. Would you recommend this over the ax1800? That person tell me he puts this router in the far end of the basement and it reaches all the way up and there are walls as well.


    TP Link AC2600

    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-AC26...efix=tp+link+wireless+router+,aps,1401&sr=8-3



    What do you mean reuse the netgear router in ap mode? I dont plan to use that router anymore once i get a new one...


    Also someone else mentioned to get two routers ... two cheap ones like the l750 and the l500 and buy two of them. Then put one on each floor and connect via ethernet. I have no idea how that is a good idea since you going to have a 50 foot ethernet cable at least going through the floors? You are completely against this right?


    Thanks again for taking so much of your time to help me on this.
     
  8. Tech Junky

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    The powerline = JACK to plug into the router on the 2nd floor via your electrical outlet

    CM = Cable Modem

    TP-Link is an alright selection. Quit thinking about AC though.

    Reconfigure the N router as a bridge / access point aka turn off the routing functions and plug it into the powerline jack

    2 routers = above N

    50ft ethernet = power line adapter using electrical wiring instead of running Ethernet

    I'm not against running Ethernet but, it usually isn't cheap but, it is more proper than the power line adapter but, getting you to think beyond spending $100 for a router doesn't seem like something you would do.

    CM -> New Router -> power line adapter -> N router in basement / first floor (depends on how often the basement is used)

    Set the N router for 2.4ghz channel 1 and set the new one for channel 11 (primary channels are 1/6/11 and most default to 6) By setting 1 & 11 clients on the 1st floor will select the strongest signal and switch to the other if the signal becomes weak.

    So, you'll have the full 200mbps available on 2nd floor and at most 100mbps from the basement due to the port only being 100mbps. 100mbps is sufficient for streaming / surfing anyway as your typical steam is under 25mbps anyway.

    So, to summarize things....

    1. pick a router that's AX to not have to do it again for a few years
    2. get the power line adapter to send Ethernet over your electrical wiring vs spending $100's on running a cable or dual new routers
    3. default the N router configuration and setup as a "bridge" or "access point" the terminology is interchangeable depending on the MFG
    4. enjoy WIFI on all 3 floors
     
  9. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Hey. So you still want me to use my old netgear n600 on one of the routers?


    I can't imagine using a 50 ft ethernet cable here. The thing is will the ethernet cable be going from one floor to another? Thus from second to first floor or basement? Because the ethernet cable will be on the floor and through different doors... that is something we definitely do here. But you are saying we avoid this but the power line adapter which is just connecting and plugging it to outlet in basement right?


    I dont want to spend more than say $150 plus tax on this. So if i get a mesh system, i could get the deco m5 and that is good enough. But again im not sure about mesh because of security and because other people say avoid it. If i get the ax router thats around 90 plus tax. Put a powerline adapter or extender, price will be still under $150. What i would want is just a router that has strong signal all three floors.


    I don't want to spend like 500 dollars on a mesh wifi system as i see some ppl recommended me this on a forum. I can pay that... but thats a lot.


    But do you have any opinion on that tp link ac600 router though? Again someone recommended this who have very similar house and they say it has no issues with range. If you go on amazon and check review, i have never seen so many people commenting on how good the range is for this router. I do know its wifi 5 though. Someone told me dont worry about new technology like wifi 6 as that just isn't necessary...


    So right now im just deciding between the AX1800 and the ac2600. But if i get that powerline adapter, would it be compatible with the ac2600? I will most likely just buy the router only first... see how the signal is like throughout the house... then if signal is bad in basement, buy the power adapter/extender. I mean its possible just the router might be good enough for the whole house? Because the ac2600 seems to have extremely good reviews on range. When i check the AX1800, i see no where as good range reviews like the ac2600.
     
  10. Tech Junky

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    [​IMG]

    AX Router - $75-$100
    Power Line Adapter - $45
    Reusing N Router - $0

    Total = $120-$150
     
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