Wifi Connection Really Bad On One Floor?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Drew1, May 14, 2021.

  1. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    24
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Okay so made a mistake in my post. Apparently there are issues with the wifi even in the second floor where the modem/router is at. So does that mean its not the signal then?


    The modem/router was always in the second floor. We never had it in the first floor. Before this issue, there was never a problem with the wifi reaching even down the basement etc.


    But what is the reason why there are issues with wifi on the same floor then? I have no idea about the router channels... its a netgear router... that i configured years ago with no issue so i dont remember what I did exactly. I can tell you the exact model of the netgear router if you like.


    The router and modem is put on a small low table... but its been like that for a while already.


    The other issue is this. Im now there now so i cannot do all these tech savy things and need to tell them to do it.


    So what would i tell them to do? Go to the netgear router wireless settings and change the channel?
     
  2. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    243
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    383
    Trophy Points:
    101
    You need to figure out what channels are in use around you to be able to figure out the best option for a manual channel assignment on each 2.4/5ghz band.

    2 things come to mind if you didn't move the R/AP and this started to happen.

    1. Someone else setup a device that's causing interference with yours and over powering the signal
    2. The AP is dying and needs to be replaced

    Go to your app store and search for "wifi signal" as an app and scan your signals. It's simple to do and will help you optimize things for the best strength / speed possible.

    Optimal setup in my eyes is to get a dumb router w/o wifi and then pick a Access Point to connect to it instead of the bundled junk on the market. This does 2 things for you.... router ($$$) doesn't need to be replaced as WIFI options upgrade and you just need to replace the AP portion only as the router protocols haven't changed in decades.

    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Integrated-Lightening-Protection-TL-R605/dp/B08QTXNWZ1 - This would hook into the CM but, also if you get a better cable modem that allows bundling ports you can configure it to do the same for redundancy and exceed 1gbps if you want to use a higher speed plan. Mind you typical CM's would max @ 2gbps though there is a Netgear CM now that has a 2.5gbps port on it which would require an overpriced "router" with all of the bells and whistles ($600+) or build your own device using a spare PC or an ITX case + the hardware.

    Take the above and hook up an AP to it for the WIFI side of it for ~$100-$150 for AX level speed / coverage.
    https://www.amazon.com/EnGenius-EWS357AP-802-11ax-MU-MIMO-Wireless/dp/B07Q59N1VY/r - $100
    https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Wireless-Access-Point-WAX610/dp/B08D3693SV - $150

    I built mine out with a NWA210AX which might be overkill
    https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-802-11ax-Manageable-Standalone-NWA210AX/dp/B08HQQ4SPQ - $229
    This won't be obsolete though for quite a long time if you're not needing to be bleeding edge for technology and provides a bump in stability if you have tons of devices connecting all of the time with the additional 5ghz radios (4x4 vs 2x2)

    One step down inline with the NG above would be the NWA110AX
    https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-802-11ax-Manageable-Standalone-NWA210AX/dp/B08BSK9SGD - $150

    With the NWA210 you have the 2.5gbps port available for higher bandwidth if you need extra bandwidth within your own network to move files around between devices or a central wired PC/server. Anyway you can do this for ~$200 and divorce the 2 specific functions for more flexibility in the future and/or reuse the existing NG as an AP on a different floor that isn't used as often.
     
  3. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    24
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Well I"m not there now so I can't check the netgear router settings. Again I don't think the channels should be an issue. It never had issues for years... then suddenly an issue because of the channel?


    But isn't the step to find out if its actually the wifi just by doing this?


    Have them connect an ethernet cable to a laptop and see how the internet is?


    Thus when you have issue with the wifi on phone or on your laptop, connect the ethernet cable to your laptop to see if it still has that issue for those few seconds?


    The router is an old netgear router bought many years ago. I mean the lights and everything is on and looks fine etc.


    I don't want to spend money on those things you mentioned yet as I want to determine what might possibly be the issue here. Again I never had any access point equipment or anything like that.
     
  4. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    243
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    383
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Ethernet rules out the WIFI being the issue but, it doesn't ix the issue.

    I've had routers/wifi devices rated for gigabit on the ports and when hooking up to it directly for testing found that the throughput was only 1/4 of that on a gigabit plan.

    If you're going to end up replacing the router then divorcing them into the setup I mentioned makes more sense in the future to isolate the expense of replacing one or the other. Also, the router has the ability to combine ports for redundancy / speed over 1gigabit or the ability to switch form port 1 to port 2 or 3 if the port dies w/o having to replace it to get back online. If the WIFI dies then you can replace the AP a lot cheaper than buying a new Netgear device again.

    Another benefit of going with these options is they're enterprise grade AP's that are going to be more performant than stuff you pick up at best buy. I actually moved a file from my server the other day over wifi at 1.3gbps which never would have happened with cheaper gear. By running dual ports from my server/router to the cable modem I'm able to speed test through a VPN at close to 1.2gbps which is the speed cap for the gigabit plan w/o considering overprovisioning by the provider that is probably ~1.4gbps since they typically add 10-20% on top of advertised speeds.
     
  5. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    24
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Do you think if we connect ethernet cable to laptop... it will have issues or not?


    So say we connect ethernet cable to laptop and there are zero issues with it... then it has to be the router then right?


    But if we connect ethernet cable to laptop and there are issues with it... then it is either the modem, router or the wiring?


    Again I dont know anything about those AP things you are mentioning.


    The thing is i want to know if the issue is something simple first... before doing something that complicated.


    Again the internet wifi has not have issues for years until recently. Again.. this issue is with wifi even on the same floor as the modem/router.
     
  6. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    243
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    383
    Trophy Points:
    101
    CM <> Laptop = rules out cabling / speed issues

    CM <> Router <> Laptop = rules out speed / cabling issues with router

    If you have speed issues with the router while WIRED then the issue is the Netgear

    AP = WIFI it's just breaking the 2 pieces of the connection into 2 parts vs the all in one approach most consumer "routers" are sold. The AP is the RADIO side of your "router" and is configured in the same manner as the Netgear you have now but, the "routing" of your IP traffic would be handled by the "router" I mentioned above.

    In essence you would end up with:

    CM <> Router <> AP (WIFI)

    You would still be able to use the additional ports on the router for wired connections as needed with the flexibility of using 1+ for the WAN (CM) and increase your bandwidth if supported or redundancy if one port/cable fails then the other takes over w/o a loss of service.

    It's really not that complicated to setup as it's a couple of power wires, a couple of ethernet cables, and rebooting the cable modem to accept the new MAC of the new Router to issue an IP from the provider. Configuring each device / FW updates as needed should only take a few minutes.
     
  7. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    24
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Okay so looks like we are going to switch internet companies. Speed plan we got from optimum is 100mbps. Im not sure exactly what was the speed test i got when i did speed test but i believe it was at least 50mbps. It isn't the 20mbps that i mentioned earlier... i made mistake with that.


    Now i mentioned our router is the netgear n600. But is it possible that because this router is really old, that this could cause the issue? Also this router is way too slow for internet nowadays? Also i checked and apparently it seem like this router doesn't even cover that much square foot? Someone posted its 100mbps... so that would mean if our internet was say 300mbps... then the router wouldn't even do 300 mbps right since its max is 100mbps? We will be switching to fios.


    Since we will be switching internet companies, what do you suggest we do now? First thing would be buy a new better wireless router right? I mean if we use the same netgear n600 router with fios... then our speed would be max 100mbps wired and probably 90mbps on wifi right even though verizon fios plan would be 300mbps?
     
  8. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    243
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    383
    Trophy Points:
    101
    YES

    Could be - I had one that had gig ports on it that only pushed 200mbps on a gig plan

    N doesn't have much margin for speed when pushing beyond being close to it

    That's what we call a BOTTLENECK

    Now that you have given some more details on what you're using I would suggest getting a new router either way. If you want better performance than use my suggestion to split them into 2 devices. Otherwise pick an AX or AC device you're comfortable with.

    See above

    See above. N600 should be capable of 600mbps as the 600 is the speed indicator and N is the technology.

    AC single clients should top out at 877mbps but in reality usually hover around 600mbps internally PC <> PC
    AX will get you internal speeds PC <> PC up to 1.3gbps

    I'm using the AX210 Intel cards for PC's and the NWA210AX for the Access Point connected to my "router" that I build that has a 5gbps connection that's limited to 2.5gbps per the port on the AP as a 5gbps AP or higher just doesn't make sense from a cost perspective.

    Since you have cable and likely aren't switching to DSL as that would be even slower you could opt for the Netgear CM2000 @ $250 but, it sounds like you're hunting for something that's under 300mbps for an ISP so, that would be overkill for now. The mototola MB8600 @ $150 would be more suitable and get you a plan speed up to 1gbps and won't be obsolete for quite awhile and is actually what I'm currently using with 2 ports bundled for over provisioning beyond 1gbps. Also, this would save you $12-$15/mo for the rental you're paying for most likely.

    If you switch to FIOS you can still bring your own equipment to hook up to the ONT they install by having a switch that can tag the VLAN info they use for their equipment. The hook up a router to that and then a WIFI AP. There's plenty of ways to play the ISP game and save some money in the long run. It's not overly complicated it just takes a bit of planning. I can't recall if VZ charges for equipment or not since I'm not in their service area and haven't looked at them in awhile.

    Besides saving $$$ with your own equipment you have the ability to lock things down for better security / leaks. Most of the SP provided EQ is basic or a bridge that allows all traffic and then your "router" is your only defense and that's susceptible as well if it's not patched regularly. If you have a spare computer sitting around or can put one together and throw linux on it you have better performance and the ability to add monitoring / security to the device as well. If I didn't bundle all the features I have running on mine the cheapest option would have been to get a NUC or similar small PC and a couple of USB Network dongles and feed one side into the ISP device and the other side into a switch / AP (wifi).

    NUC - $120 https://www.amazon.com/Beelink-T4-x5-Z8500-Computer-Ethernet/dp/B08D983Y42/
    WIFI - is built into it as a client and could potentially use hostapd to turn it into an AP w/ software (depends on the chip being used / Intel doesn't work for this purpose)
    2 x Dongles - $15ea https://www.amazon.com/Gigibit-Ethernet-Adapter-Portable-1000Mbps/dp/B089ZYB76D
    4 port switch - $9 https://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-Unmanaged-GREENnet-TEG-S50g-Protection/dp/B081JP3RBN/
    AP AX - ~$90 https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Wireless-Access-Point-WAX214/dp/B08PQ3CRWK
    ~$250 + tax -- you have 100% control over your data / more secure / can apply whole house VPN / traffic monitoring / mitigation options
    Linux download - FREE
    Configuration - FREE


    Netgear AX1800 - $70 https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-4-Stream-AX1800-Router-RAX20/dp/B07Z5JWRWJ/
    The only downside to this or anything like it is that when it starts to die you're at the mercy of buying more plastic to replace it. If it completely dies you're stuck w/o any protection plugging into the ISP "modem" directly and exposed to a lot of garbage or even a ransom attack. With the PC / Dongles you would have your firewall configuration between you and the danger while shopping for a new access point.

    The flexibility of putting together your own solution allows you some play in how you want things to perform and/or upgrades are significantly cheaper to swap out pieces rather than a unit off the shelf at walmart or best buy. Basic configuration in linux is only about 20-25 lines of configuration + changing some of the defaults from client to router capabilities like turning on NAT so the inside (LAN) and outside (WAN) can converse and you can reach websites. You can put in triggers to block all outside traffic coming in (as it should be) unless it originated a session from you to a site. If you want you can auto block "attackers" and never respond to them again. You can place "filters" on certain devices if you need to. I log quite a bit through some apps that let me see what's being used and from what device and have a couple of different graph options to look for spikes in traffic or DNS requests. I setup pihole as an app to block out all of the tracking / ads that consume bandwidth / surveillance. You can funnel all of your traffic through your favorite VPN as a secondary security measure and avoid your ISP tracking all of your traffic. You'll be able to setup your own DHCP / DNS / other services as needed and if you can to change which DNS servers you're using to resolve names it's a quick click in pihole to change them since your DHCP should be pointing devices to that for blocking junk anyway.

    With pihole you can use pre configured lists of junk you want filtered out that can auto update every 24 hours or whenever the publisher updates them. Pihole will show your clients / count as you can see which device might be generating significantly more traffic than another which could indicate an infection or hijack. If you're using a streaming stick you can knock out the metrics spying through adding the domain to the block section to decrease targeted shows / advertising.

    Of course the router companies offer select options that make you feel better but, are they still collecting your data and then selling it later?
     
  9. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    24
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Okay so the netgear n600 router we have... the max mbps is 600 mbps? Someone told me that this router is very old and is max 100mbps. And that is with ethernet. Thus when on wifi, its probably 90 mbps. But you say the n600 should be capable of 600mbps?



    I checked amazon page for this product


    https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-N600...ar+n600&qid=1623556068&sr=8-8#customerReviews


    And even though in description it says 300+300 mbps, thus 600 mbps, if you read some of the reviews, type in keyword 600 mbps and 100 mbps, you see tons of reviewers saying you get max 100 mbps wired and around 25 mbps via wifi.


    I remember when I did the speedtest when on wifi... i don't think it was any higher than 25 mbps at the most. It could have been 50 mbps... but i don't remember exactly. And since our cable internet is 100 mbps, wouldn't that mean this router indeed only has max 100 mbps then?




    Those routers you linked are pretty expensive. Yea we are going to use our own router, we not going to rent from verizon fios as that is ridiculous to pay monthly fee.


    Thoughts on these routers on amazon?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B079JD7F7G/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00R2AZLD2/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
     
  10. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    243
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    383
    Trophy Points:
    101
    The WIFI speed is capable of 600mbps but, the hardwired ports are FE which caps them to 100mbps

    upload_2021-6-12_23-19-40.png

    upload_2021-6-12_23-13-30.png

    https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-N600...eviewerType=all_reviews&pageNumber=1&filterByKeyword=gigabit&sortBy=recent

    Definitively time for an upgrade either way since this thing is ancient in terms of technology. 100mbps / FE was obsoleted many years ago by gigabit

    [​IMG]

    It's already been over 20 years since gigabit was released and gigabit resolved a lot of the nuances of prior technologies such as having to use a crossover cable to connect 2 PC's directly.

    It's a good idea to stay a bit more current as with each new generation not only to things go faster but, they become more reliable / use less energy to power the packets down the cable as well.

    Routers / Cable Modems for today tech hover around $100/ea or more depending on how future proof you want to be and not have to buy more of them in a shorter time period. The MB8600 should be good for 10 years at the pace that cable co's are upgrading to newer technologies. Ideally they would just wire buildings similar to FIOS and handoff Ethernet from their DEMARC where you simply plugin your "router" and go from there. The whole needing a CPE device to terminate the connection is old fashioned but, then again we're talking about ASYNC cable service similar to DSL where the download is significantly higher than the upload unless you opt for business class service which doesn't really use the COAX equipment to get back to the internet as it runs over fiber.

    I had a Netgear R7800 for AC before making my own w/ AX. I was able to push 600-700mbps internally with it. TP-Link is decent enough though too just read the reviews to make sure they're not sending out a bad batch similar to any company like Netgear / Linksys / etc.

    For $10 more you can go with the one I linked above and be AX capable for better performance overall if you slap a AX210 card into your laptop. Skip the AX201 as they're a bit buggy when it comes to speeds / consistency.

    Netgear AX1800 - $70 https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-4-Stream-AX1800-Router-RAX20/dp/B07Z5JWRWJ/

    Sure $150 for a cable modem seems like a big investment but, it only takes 10 months to recover the cost when you think about the monthly charge from the cable provider. Going with the $250 one from Netgear would be my upgrade path since I'm running 5gigabit ports on my "router" which still leaves room for the next upgrade when they start incorporating them into modems or jump to 10gigabit options to keep the price down. I've had my MB8600 for 3-4 years already (savings $10/mo - $300-400 // $15/mo - $450-$600) and it's been flawless other than provider outages or power outages. I find rebooting it every once in awhile helps when things feel a bit sluggish and switching VPN endpoints doesn't seem to do much.

    Cheap and disposable equipment for the masses with very little customizability works for most but, if you want to take control of things leaking out to the internet going custom will get you there w/o spending thousands. Throwing all of your traffic through a VPN provider on top of proper configuration leads to some piece of mind, less spam, and reduced risk of your connection being hijacked or ransomed. I bought a 3-year through NordVPN for under $2/mo after rebates through rakuten ($20 off) + % back for buying it. Now that they're using "nordlynx" which uses wireguard instead of openvpn you can actually maintain your speeds close to actual wiespeed you're paying for whereas OVPN typically maxes out at 100mbps no matter the bandwidth being supplied due to the overhead of processing the packets to en/decrypt each one before send/receive.
     
Loading...

Share This Page