Wifi Connection Really Bad On One Floor?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Drew1, May 14, 2021.

  1. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    In another location now. They have cable internet. The main modem is in the upper floor of our house and we have two floors. Lately, the internet has been extremely bad on the first floor. I went upstairs to reset the modem/router... by that i mean unplug it from the wall outlet... both of them for a minute or so, then plugged back in. Went back to first floor and wifi seems better. But now internet on the first floor is back to being really slow/bad. For many years, this was rarely the case.



    We had the modem installed upstairs a while back as oppose to first floor. Netgear router and a cable modem. Nothing really has changed except the wifi downstairs is really bad recently. No issue at all upstairs.




    What can i do here? Also is there a way to check for wifi connection on the first floor such as use a laptop and check how stable an internet connection is? I know there is speedtest but all that does is test how fast it is etc. LIke doing a test to check the internet for a certain amount of minutes to see if there is any wifi drop usage etc? I keep going to websites and loading them to see how fast it goes etc but almost always, you see the connecting... for a bit before either error or taking a while and it working. Thus the wifi is not reliable for some reason on the first floor?
     
  2. hacktrix2006

    hacktrix2006 Hold My Vodka, I going to kill my GPU

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    Best bet is to run a wire to a new Access point (much better then mesh networking).

    Sent from my SNE-LX1 using Tapatalk
     
  3. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Im not sure what you mean by new wire to a new access point...


    You talking about connecting an ethernet cable from the router on the second floor to the first floor and connecting it to laptop to see if it works wired? I have to assume you dont mean this...


    Also i was told this was an issue for a few weeks already... so i thought it couldn't be because suddenly we using a few extra devices etc.
     
  4. hacktrix2006

    hacktrix2006 Hold My Vodka, I going to kill my GPU

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    No what I mean is Wire from router to a new Wireless access point.


    Sent from my SNE-LX1 using Tapatalk
     
  5. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    How would i do that? By new wireless access point, I need to buy something right?
     
  6. hacktrix2006

    hacktrix2006 Hold My Vodka, I going to kill my GPU

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  7. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Okay. But what can i do right now to check it if any
     
  8. hacktrix2006

    hacktrix2006 Hold My Vodka, I going to kill my GPU

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    Do you have a spare router with wireless?

    If so you can set it up.

    1) Disable DHCP
    2) Assign it an IP in the same IP range and subnet as your current network
    3) Setup the Wireless
    4) Disable any firewall on the secondary router.

    Then connect to it and see if it works, placing an RJ45 cable between the main network router and the secondary one should work without issues.

    Off to bed but hopefully the above helps.
     
  9. Jdpurvis

    Jdpurvis Notebook Evangelist

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    You may well have some channel conflicts. Perhaps you have a new neighbor with a really strong signal on the channel you are using. Get yourself a copy of inSSIDer (free, as long as you register), so you can see all of the wifi signals, strength and channels. If you put it on a laptop, you can move around the house to see what is happening. Once you know what other signals are competing, you can shift the channels for the router so that they are not in conflict with others. Keep in mind that 5 gHz is faster, but 2.4 gHz penetrates better.
     
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  10. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    @Drew1

    So, why did you move things upstairs from where things were working fine?

    If you want better coverage adding an additional "radio" for better coverage is the answer unless you want to replace the Netgear all together. Either you're having a signal issue from someone nearby, the router is starting to fail, or something in the house is causing interference / blocking the signal from reaching the other floor.

    AP = Access Point - additional piece of equipment that extends your existing wifi signal / name to another area of your building. It simply plugs into your "router" with an ethernet cable, you do a little bit of configuring to setup the WIFI and then you have better connectivity where you don't currently.

    Router = wired connection to the ISP + AP built in for WIFI

    Cable Modem <-> Router / WIFI <-> AP

    For instance I wanted to go WFI6 and didn't buy into the whole getting an overpriced piece of plastic being offered from the typical off the shelf suppliers. I had already built my "router" and WIFI and just needed to switch out the WIFI side to provide more speed through 802.11AX. I took out the WIFI card I was using for the AP side of it and added a NWA201AX from Zyxel and that took care of the signal switch from AC to AX to provide better coverage / speed. The NWA201AX cost ~ $200 vs a full fledged AX router running $500-$600. For most the 210AX would be overkill as most consumer devices don't have a 2.5GE port to plug into on their ISP/ Router side to boost the max speeds above 1gbps. There's a slightly lower model the NWA110AX ~$150 that will suffice for coverage/speed.

    There's a ton of options for an AP to provide better coverage and if you're not running 1gbps or higher then considering an AC based AP would be an option and those are in the $50-$100 range. It depends more on how you're going to use your WIFI and how your signals / interference look around your house. You need to scan the signals with a phone app at least to see what's going on so you can pick a channel that won't drop out on you causing a slow connection.

    When picking a signal / channel... the lower the channel number the higher penetration / distance you'll see with it. For my case after scanning the WIFI around me I found channel 8 for 2.4ghz as best. On the 5ghze side it's a bit trickier depending on the options you choose to go with since you can choose 20/40/80/160mhz bandwidth options which bundle channels together for faster speeds and diversity. 20/40mhz channels have more flexibility on which ones you can choose to bundle together. The 80/160mhz bundles are a bit more limited to choices as 160mhz offer only 2 options due to limited bandwidth / DFS exclusions. With the 80mhz option you have a few more and still get sufficient speeds up to 1gbps.
     
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