WiFi 6 + Intel AX200. What to really expect?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Tyranus07, Sep 9, 2020.

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  1. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    The full screen pics are essentially the same in terms of throughput. I just reversed the roles and replayed that benchmark.

    The second test was just ran long enough to saturate the chart but the first test was for about 5 minutes, had I left it on, it may have leveled off to a similar point.
     
  2. Tyranus07

    Tyranus07 Notebook Evangelist

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    Oh I get it, well the longer the time the test run, the more representative is the average throughput. Something I couldn't find in the Tamasoft documentation is if the software test is uploading and downloading at the same time, and since wi-fi is half duplex if the test were to run uploading/downloading only then the throughput would remain the same (i.e. ~1300 Mbps uploading / 0 Mbps downloading...... ~0 Mbps uploading / 1300 Mbps downloading .... ~500 Mbps uploading / 800 Mbps downloading) What a shame that the software doesn't allow to test one direction data flow only, which is my case most of the time.

    Also there is like a 50% difference between the speed of downloading and uploading, this issue is relevant in case the throughput isn't constant across the uploading/downloading different states (downloading only, uploading only, uploading and downloading)
     
  3. downloads

    downloads Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I think that it does test one direction at a time but you can confirm it easily - instead of searching through documentation just start the test and look in process manager at Wi-Fi throughput.
     
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  4. Tyranus07

    Tyranus07 Notebook Evangelist

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    So I finally got my AX setup. Intel AX200 + Huawei AX3 Pro.

    The router has solid performance for my needs, at least, the only issue I had is the firmware is in Chinese but I sorted out using the translate tool from Google Chrome. The Router has little software options but I really don't need QoS/VLANS or any advanced stuff.

    I feel that the speed really got so much better compared to my old AC setup.

    This is my results in Tamosoft, I let the software running for like 1 hour:

    [​IMG]

    This is what I got in real world file transfer from my laptop to my remote server. The server is connected via Gigabit Ethernet and the laptop is using AX200:

    [​IMG]

    I have done several tests and always get that speed or similar behavior, which is more than good to me. Previously I was getting most of the time like 20 MB/s and best case scenario 45 MB/s using AC 867 Mbps with the AC9260 (server in wired connected to gigabit ethernet as always) and not as solid performance more fluctuating speeds I'd say.

    This is using the speeds I get using the laptop connected via gigabit ethernet to the same switch as the remote server which is also connected using gigabit ethernet:

    [​IMG]

    The difference is not that big and maybe the mechanical HDD is being a bottleneck to the communication link. At the end of the day I'd say that the performance difference is quite high and also the uplink is more stable.

    By the way this is what I see in the resources manager while using Tamosoft:

    [​IMG]

    Is a bit weird isn't? Maybe Tamosoft is extrapolating data? I don't know really...but while tamosoft is measuring like 600 Mbps the resource manager is reading like 4 Mbps
     
  5. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

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    80-90MB/s is about all a 1Gbps link will handle.

    If you want more or a challenge read on...

    If you want the full boost you need to enable 160mhz & qos.

    When disabling qos on another router I wasn't able to hit the max speeds / link with the 160mhz channel option.

    There are also some things you need to change in the advanced options of the wifi adapter as well to get the max performance out of it.

    LAN performance should hit the Gigabit threshold (check) unless the router has a 2.5Gbps port or the ability to LAG/LACP 2+ ports together to provide a bigger pipe to pass traffic.

    For example:
    NWA210AX Zyxel AX AP has a 2.5gbps port for the data
    TPE-215GI 2.5gbps POE injector / or you can source a 12v2A power adapter
    CD0674 (USB) or SD-PEX24065 (PCIE) 2.5gbps ethernet adapter (for devices you want to connect to at full speed i.e.NAS, Server, etc.)
    QNAP QSW-1105-5T is a 2.5gbps switch (for internal devices 4 + 1 to existing router)

    This would get you end to end 2.5gbps max throughput or at least 2.4gbps on 5ghz ax / additional 575mbps on 2.4ghz

    Oh, and if you're using cable there's a new modem out that has a 2.5gbps port on it - CM2000 / Dell is selling them for $269
    ***These are so new that the Motorola MB8611 isn't even showing up for sale anywhere yet as a competitor***

    Build your own router from an old PC and throw in the 2.5gbps NIC above and the POE injector and you have a full fledged AX router that beats the speeds of most you can get off the shelf but at a bit of a premium but with better coverage w/o adding more extenders/pods to the mix.

    CM2000 <2.5> BYOR <2.5> switch <2.5> AP + POE
    <2.5> LAN devices
    Once providers flip the switch you can have 2.5g end to end w/o having to buy thousand $ devices or pay rental fees for one. If you want to upgrade to 5gbps/10gbps service down the road it's a simple swap of your NIC for a higher 10gbps NIC that's adaptive like the Asus down below.

    A little less complicated -
    Asus RT-AX86U - Cheaper solutions as well at $249
    (2.5 port is wan OR lan though) + switch to add more 2.5 ports to LAN devices

    NETGEAR Nighthawk AX12 (RAX120) AX6000 - ~$500
    This one has a single LAN 2.5/5gbps port
    - there are 5gbps cards out there but, a single port 10gbps card might be more cost effective and future proof
    - 5gbps to your storage might be worth it as it may have the ability to fun at 5gbps or add a 5gbps -
    TUC-ET5G or NT-SS5G ($60) USB
    ASUS XG-C100C ($100) 10g/5g/2.5g/1g/100m NIC

    10 port 10G switch w/ POE and multiple 2.5/5/10g ports - MS510TXPP @ $349
    Same w/o POE - MS510TX @ $269
     
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  6. Tyranus07

    Tyranus07 Notebook Evangelist

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    Thanks for the good tips. In the future I'll be updating my server with a new motherboard, processor, etc. Maybe I'll take your advice and mount a virtual machine on my server and make that virtual machine a router. But that's not gonna happen any time soon, let's say I'm struggling a little bit with money and I rather update my server with new 10th gen Intel processor and RTX 3000 series. I guess there are tons of Linux distributions that emulates Cisco routers and can be installed in a virtual machine??
     
  7. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

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    VM = Cheaper
    Metal = a bit more secure

    If you went USB instead of NIC limiting yourself a bit to 5G you could do a MicroPC that's the size of a coaster but still have the swapability of a PC while limited still possible to have a in/out port setup where you can enforce FW options more stringently w/o possible software / buffer issues w/ VM. Even an ITX case would work for 2 PCI cards whether you went 2.5/G or 10G since those options are cheaper than looking at dual port cards (2.5 don't exist unless dual 10G nbase-t) or 10G which avg's around $180 either nbase-t/SFP (extra $35/port and compatibility issues)

    Right now I'm just running a 4 port Gig I350 in a LACP bundle but, you could do the dual 10G and that would work for in/out designations and allow flexibility down the road for higher speeds as they get released by providers.

    It's all about planning before you start and deciding the priorities of wants vs needs.

    For me I put several devices into a single case condensing 5-6 different things into 1. Dropped my power usage, saves space, performs better than the items did separately, and just easier to manage. Pricing wasn't too bad until I went from a single spinner for storage to a Raid 10 setup for speed / redundancy. Mind you tinkering and tweaking things lead to using 3 different mobo's / cases to get to the final result as things changed.
     
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