WiFi 6 + Intel AX200. What to really expect?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Tyranus07, Sep 9, 2020.

Tags:
  1. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    1,680
    Messages:
    2,324
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Trophy Points:
    181
    My most sophisticated clients at the moment are Intel AC1550 2x2 Wave2 160Hz 1733. I would need a 6 AP to see any improvement from AX210. I guess the only reason to get AX210 over AX200 would be future proofing, since performance should be the same using a 6 router, or am I missing something?

    The thing is, I don't really have the time for this, spent far too much of it already - the motivation was to figure out an upgrade path to 2Gbps transfers to the NAS - now I know that's likely impossible without upgrading the NAS or building a cusotm one....
    Think I will just see how it goes for now.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021 at 6:28 PM
  2. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    74
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    56
    2GE to the NAS is possible through a cable / switch setup. It depends on the clients though on how you approach it. Since you don't have an expansion slot on the 918+ the LAG / Bundle has to hit a switch or a PC w/ dual ports to take advantage of it.

    The downside to the 2.5gbps switch is that it's unmanaged and wouldn't allow a LAG setup. You would need a managed switch to bump the combined ports off the NAS to get the throughput gain. To get above 1GE though you'd have to run 2 client sessions to get it to kick in on the 2nd link due to the method Synology uses to do LAG.

    A full 125MB/s though is a nice upgrade from your existing setup. If you go down the path prescribed and then leap to 6E when it's a bit more common or Zyxel updates the 1gbps cap on QOS it would be a bit more immediate and long lasting impact.

    Seeing as though the 918+ is a 4-bay that's convertible into a PC case a bit easier than if it was more drives. The $ you would spend upgrading the chassis / network functionality would be more prudent to convert to a PC NAS where you have more options down the road. If you're doing the migration it's a good time to think about the drives if you're running over 50% utilization.

    There's a 2-port 2.5GE card that's available for about $45 and I would opt for 2 of those //or// the 5 port 2.5GE switch.
    1-AP
    1-Router
    3-ports to LAN devices / AP's depending on how you want to setup things //or// add router functionality to the new PC/NAS which is where the 2nd card comes into play

    https://www.techhive.com/article/3564821/how-to-make-your-home-network-faster.html

    Doing a homebrew router isn't that difficult and since there aren't any PCIe cards supporting 6/6E it takes out the complication of setting up hostapd for an AP and sourcing a viable chipset other than Intel.

    But, as you said you don't have the time for this sort of thing right now....
     
  3. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    1,680
    Messages:
    2,324
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Yeah, good point. Going from 80MB/s to 125MB/s would be a decent upgrade, although nowhere near the quantum leap from 11n to ac, but really don't have time for the DIY route. Would need to grab your Zyxel and a switch - will take a look over the weeknd. I don't want to lose the long range performance though, which evidently is the forte of the EX8000. If the Zyxel has 4 antennas and supports beam forming well, it should match it. Otherwise would just return it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021 at 6:06 AM
  4. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    74
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    56
    It's all about environment. Try it out for a couple of weeks and see how it works, if you don't like it then return it. You'll get good coverage if you're not living in a granite cave or something where the signal can't penetrate the walls. N >> AC was dramatic in comparison but the potential is there to double it if the cap is lifted in the next revision of the software.

    I don't buy into the hype of marketing from any company when it comes to WIFI and base things on experience.
     
  5. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    1,680
    Messages:
    2,324
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Trophy Points:
    181
    BTW guys what about jumbo frames? Do you use them? Does the Zyxel AX210 AP support them?
     
  6. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    74
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    56
    For them to show any effect you need saturation. 5-10 clients probably won't get you there. In networks I've worked on the only time I see them in use is 10GE+ solutions.
     
    etern4l likes this.
  7. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    1,680
    Messages:
    2,324
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Trophy Points:
    181
    That's counter-intuitive. Should work at any physical transport speed, it just means that the header is smaller relative to the payload, increasing efficiency and throughput but also latency. On the flipside, any retransmissions are costly, so probably not the best solution for mobile networks. Doesn't work with my setup anyway, not even over Ethernet: enabled on the NAS - fine, enabled on the NIC - np, enabled in Windows - fail.

    Edit: nm - the difference is 116MB/s max throughput over 1GE vs 123MB/s with 9k jumbo frames.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021 at 3:39 PM
    Aivxtla likes this.
  8. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    575
    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    782
    Trophy Points:
    106
    upload_2021-1-14_18-37-30.jpeg

    I’ve never really bothered with it because as far as I knew the Netgear routers I had generally didn’t support it. Maybe the one I have now does not sure.
     
    etern4l likes this.
  9. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    1,680
    Messages:
    2,324
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Itching to pull the trigger on something to play around with AX over the weekend. None of the products fully satisfy me. I can see why people may be wanting to build their own routers/APs.

    Does your RAX120 suffer from the 1Gbps per client QoS limit when using the 5Gbps port?
    Also, do you know if it supports 802.11k or v? Nothing in the documentation, other than the extenders "work better with Netgear routers" - not clear why.

    Another option is the Asus RT-AX86U - 2.5G and link aggregation which doesn't work in AP mode lol. Not certified, but AC86U and AX88U are. It has some AIMesh support (?), and simple "assisted roaming" whereby it drops connections under a threshold strength. Not sure.

    Also struggling with switches - pushed that out to a separate thread.

    I also have a few specific questions about Zyxel - moved that to another thread too. Many thanks for your help guys.

    Totally seeing why people would want to build their own network equipment, given the market offerings :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021 at 7:47 AM
  10. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    74
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    56
    BYOR = cost savings when you have specific ideas in mind that aren't encompassed in "consumer" equipment but can be found in enterprise equipment.

    I could design a BYOR to fit smaller offices where port density isn't needed and can be offloaded to a combination of WIFI/wired. When you need more port density it becomes more cost effective to use more switches and uplink but BYOR can still handle multiple switches to aggregate them into different cards. It becomes a layout / design challenge deciding on your bandwidth / uplink requirements but also your WAN/ISP speeds.

    It also depends on the "support" side as well when you have some custom setup not everyone you hire for support will know how to address issues when you're not using common equipment. If something fails and you don't have parts on stock somewhere for quick deployment it becomes an issue for downtime / recovery. This is where the Cisco's come into play vs a custom setup or an off brand.
     
    etern4l likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page