Wide gamut? How does it work?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Voltran, Nov 28, 2014.

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  1. Voltran

    Voltran Notebook Geek

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    I've read that the colours can be more intense on AdobeRGB than on sRGB, but what happens physically?

    If the monitor has to display a pure green on a wide gamut monitor, how is is greener than on a sRGB one? Assuming it's a 8 bit monitor, the signal is going to be (0,255,0) whether it's on the AdobeRGB or the sRGB monitor, am I missing something?

    So two questions, is the digital values of the colours fed to the monitor the same?
    And how does it display "more intense" colours when when lighting up pixels?
     
  2. Samot

    Samot Notebook Evangelist

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    In a srgb and an Adobe rgb panel the same values will translate in a different result if you´re not colour managed (os, aplication, image with embedded colour profile). As the name implies, a wide gamut panel (ie. Adobe rgb), has a wider colour space, it is able to show colours that are outside the srgb colour space, and that has all to do with the backlight used. (wled vs gr-rgb led)

    [​IMG]


    Nevermind the "bits" of the monitor, that isn´t related to the colour spaces, it just gives you an indication of how many colours/gradations/steps the panel is able to display: 6-bit= 262k ; 8-bit=16million ; 10-bit=1billion.
    So, if you have a wide gamut monitor but it is 6-bit, it´ll have to "spread" the 262k colours over that big range that it´s able to display - the problem here is that if you want to display a single colour gradient, it´ll most likely show signs of heavy banding. Instead, if the same wide gamut monitor is 10bit, it´ll have much more colours to "spread" (1billion) over its wide range, so there´ll be much less "gaps" and you´ll see soft and continuous gradients and transitions.

    For more on this subject check out tftcentral.co.uk
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2014
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