Which Thermal Paste to buy and apply (Traditional and Liquid Metal)

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Vasudev, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Virtuoso

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    Dunno about Asus, but HP laptops that have LM from the factory use nickel plating.
     
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  2. jc_denton

    jc_denton V̖̟en̰g̻̼̰̩͙ea̲n̪c̭e̼ ͍̘̤͓̟̤Is̙͔ ̤Mi̻̭̣͎͍ͅn̰ḙ

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    They are most likely using nickel plated heatsink for the cpu.
     
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  3. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    Here's MX-4 after 2 months:

    upload_2020-4-9_10-49-45.png
    And on the CPU:
    upload_2020-4-9_10-50-41.png
    That discoloration is frankly disgusting. DON'T USE IT FOR LAPTOPS.

    By the end of March I was noticing a significant variation in core temperatures (Up to 12C), and my 10210U would shoot to over 90C within 10 seconds of a Prime 95 (~35W Package Power Consumption). I'm assuming the high temperatures simply exacerbated the degradation.

    So I repasted with Noctua NT-H1:
    upload_2020-4-9_10-52-51.png
    My laptop didn't have any TIM between the PCH (Left small rectangle) but I decided to put some on anyway. I'm sure it doesn't hurt. Anyways temperatures are a lot more stable. Unfortunately I don't have any clear benchmarks because I was busy, but core variations are within 3C of each other, so that's a good thing I guess.

    Unfortunately my laptop still can't handle a full run of CB20 (Package Power 38-40W) without reaching the 97C PROCHOT limit. That's because of the feather-light (literally) single heatpipe:
    upload_2020-4-9_10-55-6.png
    (Old picture, factory stock TIM)

    Lenovo also has a second heatsink version for the same model of my laptop, but with two heatpipes (for an additional dGPU). When those parts are made available, I might try to see how well two heatpipes fare.
     
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  4. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Instead of that Asus laptops should use beefier heatsink and not a shared heatsink.
    I doubt none will invest in LM since a slight miscalculation or a runaway LM can kill your entire expensive BGA to a paperweight having BGA vendor logos which might impress a Business client!
     
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  5. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    Cooling systems with shared heatsinks are fine, they just need to use more of them or use thicker ones.

    I'd say going to LM is a sign of progress though. It pushes laptop manufacturers to design for it and make it safe and long lasting.
     
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  6. 0lok

    0lok Notebook Deity

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    Do you think it would also lead to void warranty for opening laptop on your own? I mean a disassemble.
     
  7. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    But everyone wants slim laptop so thin shared heatsink is bad.
    I like bigger heatsinks because my ambients are always >35C with 60% humidity.
     
  8. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    A very bad idea. With help from Nvidia we will now get even worse cooling than ever from the notebook manufacturers. More Junkbooks with barely enough cooling for both Cpu and Gpu. Saved by Nvidia's Dynamic Boost!

    Like SmartShift, NVIDIA’s Dynamic Boost is designed to take advantage of the fact that in many laptop designs, the GPU and the CPU share a common thermal budget, typically because they are both cooled via the same set of heatpipes. In practice, this is usually done in order to allow OEMs to build relatively thin and light systems, where the cooling capacity of the system is more than the TDP either of the CPU or GPU alone, but less than the total TDP of those two processors together.

    This allows OEMs to design around different average, peak, and sustained workloads, offering plenty of headroom for peak performance while sacrificing some sustained performance in the name of lighter laptops.
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/15692/nvidia-details-dynamic-boost-tech-and-advanced-optimus
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  9. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    IDK why OEM's try to get peak performance rather than sustained thermal performance. It makes advances in techs useless. I still have Ivybridge Pentium CPU that hold upto 35W at sustained usage but my BGA power throttles when it reaches more than 27W.
     
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  10. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    Asus doesn't have a sticker on the outside to show if you have disassembled it or not but it has a sticker on one of the heatsink screws which you can easily remove and put back.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
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