Which Thermal Paste to buy and apply (Traditional and Liquid Metal)

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Vasudev, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    No, @Falkentyne is correct, you need to "rough up" the surface to keep LM in place if the surface won't hold LM in place.

    Adding the barrier can help, but nothing can keep LM vs gravity from working together to eventually leak - if it's going to it's going to. LM finds away.

    That's why conductive pastes aren't a good idea. No matter how good you are, eventually a random flick of the stick and the silvery globules of doom will take out a motherboard component - maybe it's needed, maybe not.

    Roll the dice on a $4000 laptop for a few degree's of C? Nah, the benefits in FPS don't warrant it.
     
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  2. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    Just finished a little experiment on heatsink lapping.

    I used my old Lenovo y410p with an i7 4700mq as the test subject.

    Here are the results after 20 mins of prime 95 at max fans

    Kryonaut
    Pre lap
    Core 1 max - 77
    Core 2 max - 79
    Core 3 max - 79
    Core 4 max - 77

    Post lap
    Core 1 max - 74
    Core 2 max - 75
    Core 3 max - 75
    Core 4 max - 74


    Conductonaut
    Pre lap
    Core 1 max - 67
    Core 2 max - 69
    Core 3 max - 67
    Core 4 max - 68

    Post lap
    Core 1 max - 65
    Core 2 max - 66
    Core 3 max - 66
    Core 4 max - 66

    So about 3-4 degrees cooler with paste and 1-3 degrees cooler with LM after lapping. So sadly lapping is no replacement for LM. I had hoped to see a better result with paste.

    I used 1500 grit to 7000 grit wet and dry to achieve a mirror finish on the heatsink. And even with a mirror finish the Liquid metal still held on just fine, no issues with that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2019
  3. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    well, lets put it like this: the fact that u were able to work with LM on your unlapped heatsink means u already had a pretty good fit and won the heatsink lottery to start with :) thus, post lapping results were expected to be marginal. nice data though!
     
  4. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    I've never had any laptops with poor heatsink fit yet. All seem to have worked well.

    All were pga/bga laptops tho. No clevos.
     
  5. 0lok

    0lok Notebook Deity

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    The alienware 15 r3 and 17 r4 are the worse ever. Best solution for a average person like me was ICD thermal paste. Just want to share info. Dont buy those laptops. hehehe..
     
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  6. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    How bad was it on those?

    Newer alienware laptops (m15/m15 r2) seem to have pretty ok heatsink fits.
     
  7. 0lok

    0lok Notebook Deity

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  8. ithanium2

    ithanium2 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I just repasted my Clevo P960 with Kryonaut. I have been using it with CM Mastergel Maker since august but I noticed thermal throttling. So I am in the market for a new cooling solution or how to tweak my existing cooling system. The TIM on the CPU was dry-ish in the center mostly and on the GPU was even worse. Funny thing tho that i had no issues with GPU temps.
    I am really considering in using a graphite pad instead of TIM. I am a little afraid of using Liquid Metal since I am afraid it could spill (I travel almost daily with my laptop and most of the time I do not use it on a flat surface).
     
  9. hfm

    hfm Notebook Prophet

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    I used the coollaboratory metal pad kit on my gram, seems to work pretty well. The kit comes with metal pad (it seems to be a liquid metal type substance in a sheet form) and you sandwich a piece of shim between two pieces of metalpad that you cut to the exact size of the die surface area and then place the heatsink back on top. It seems pretty safe as the substance I am guessing liquifies and "cures" (I don't think it's really curing so I air-quote that) under heat of the CPU. The shim keeps it sticking to the area instead of outflowing.

    This laptop has pretty poor heat management and it seems to work just SLIGHTLY better than the kryonaut I tried first. The heatpipe/sink still gets saturated very easily so it doesn't help all that much in this unit but it does seem to keep normal non-high-load operating temperatures slightly under what kryonaut was.
     
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  10. Felix_Argyle

    Felix_Argyle Notebook Consultant

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    Why would there be an issue? Liquid Metal will stick even to glass surface. It does not need the surface to be rough, anyone who says this is wrong. This is why it is always better to have as smooth surface as possible since even the tiniest scratch will form a gap which will lower thermal conductivity even if it is filled with thermal paste.
     
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