Which Thermal Paste to buy and apply (Traditional and Liquid Metal)

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Vasudev, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    ignore the thermal conductivity values they put on the packages, they dont mean jack squat :)

    also, the scratching effect of ICD is only "bad" when it comes to visuals. but it wont actually damage any of your hardware, so you can just stick to ICD, no worries :)
     
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  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    But only *we* know that! But outsiders will treat it as paste caused the chip to be scratched!
    I am using CM MakerGel Nano and it has same composition as ICD but much smoother.
     
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  3. Frencho

    Frencho Notebook Enthusiast

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    So minimal pump out effect just like with IC Diamond? Well might as well pick it up if it will last 3 years or so.

    BTW are the new CM Mastergel Maker with the novel flat-nose syringe applicator thingy using a different composition or it's the same old one as OG Mastergel Maker?
    [​IMG]
    Anyone used the new flatnosed syringe if so, what's your feedback while applying it on the smaller, narrower rectangular delidded mobile CPU-GPU dies?!
     
  4. Felix_Argyle

    Felix_Argyle Notebook Consultant

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    Conductivity values are meaningless, only thing you should look at is how viscous the thermal paste is. The more viscous it is - the more it will last in notebooks because notebooks have heatsinks with low mounting pressure and uneven mounting pressure (most manufacturers do not use a 4-point mounting for CPU heatsink plate) and need a thick paste to compensate for those.
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-comparison,5108-12.html

    This is not true. Use a common sense for a bit. Ideally you want a perfectly flat surface for both heatsink and the CPU surface because metal-to-metal heat transfer is most efficient. That's a fact, not an opinion ;-) Let's say you made a scratch - that area will definitely have less contact area now compared to perfectly flat area and even if you will fill the scratch with thermal paste - the paste will have less thermal conductivity than a direct metal-to-metal contact ;-) Of course, a few tiny scratches will not have measurable effect, but let's say you put a lot of them and some of them will be big - there will definitely be a difference. This is why many users of desktop CPUs used to do "lapping" or polishing of both heatsink and CPU IHS (and get up to 10C difference according to their own tests) and why MSI is now doing the same to heatsink on their GT76:
    https://us.msi.com/Laptop/GT76-Titan-9SX
     
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  5. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    we are talking about providing long lasting thermal paste to regular joe users / fire and forget :) but sure, for enthusiasts every degree saved is worth it.

    Sent from my Xiaomi Mi Max 2 (Oxygen) using Tapatalk
     
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  6. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Still using the old one w/o any issues.
     
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  7. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    No, you are right and wrong here. Lapping is to get rid of concave or convex surfaces. This reduces the distance across the surfaces from each other. But, unless the surfaces are so flat that they have an attraction to reach other, where say the IHS will stay with the heat sink without some other substance between them, you will need some sort of material to facilitate the heat transfer. Scuffing can help with this, allowing pastes, especially liquid metal, to "wet" or adhere to the surface better. It allows for filling in voids better and giving surface contact area that the paste helps move the heat to.

    So there is a bit of both there. Personally, I would lap to mirror, then use a diamond paste to put an extremely fine scuff on the surface. You get the surfaces flat to maximize surface contact while also giving the imperfections to allow the paste to adhere to both surfaces to get great heat transfer.
     
  8. eurodj101

    eurodj101 Notebook Evangelist

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    Hello When using CM maker gel nano or GC extreme do we spread or is it the same as ICD where u just apply a line in the middle and let it do its thing?
     
  9. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Spread method is better.
     
  10. CptXabaras

    CptXabaras Overclocked, Overvolted, Liquid Cooled

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    Thanks for sharing this video, really interesting
     
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