when will 6TB or 8TB portable hard drive be available?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by kenny1999, Feb 19, 2018.

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  1. kenny1999

    kenny1999 Notebook Evangelist

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    Now as far as I know the largest capacity of portable hard drive (not desktop hard drive) is 5TB

    will 6TB or 8TB portable hard drive be put to the market in the near future?
     
  2. yotano21

    yotano21 Notebook Evangelist

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    I have not heard of anything and believe me, I am still waiting, 4 years now, anything larger than 2tb in a 9.5mm or thinner size.
     
  3. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    ha, ive asked that myself to be honest :)

    so far, max capacity 2.5 inch HDDs had the following release dates:

    external / internal
    1 TB = 2009 / 2010
    1.5 TB = 2011 / 2012
    2 TB = 2012 / 2012
    3 TB = 2014 / 2016
    4 TB = 2014 / 2016
    5 TB = 2016 / 2016

    as you can see, external 2.5" HDDs are available way earlier than internal ones. extrapolating from this history, we have an average of 1.75 years for the release of higher capacity external HDDs and 3 years for the release of higher capacity internal HDDs.

    so my guess: 6 TB external HDD available at end of 2018 / beginning of 2019 and 6 TB internal HDD available sometime in 2019/2020, maybe even later...
     
  4. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    That's probably because it's OK to put 12.5mm or thicker drives into external units and these have more platters. Most notebooks won't hold drives thicker than 7mm or 9.5mm.

    John
     
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  5. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    I have a 2.5" Seagate Expansion 4TB External Hard Drive.

    The highest internal HDD's for available right now top out at 2GB.
    I hadn't seen or heard anything about upcoming releases of higher capacity drives though...

    There are already 4TB SSD's 2.5" available for purchase (if you can afford one of course - it's price is about 7x higher than my external 4tb hdd).

    At this rate, I think that affordable high capacity consumer SSD's will overshoot mobile HDD's (Which don't seem to be too high of a priority).


    I also noticed several science and technology developments years ago that should have enabled higher capacity drives by now, but alas, like most other research it's almost never put into practical use due to artificial cost prohibitions, and its still based on upgrading HDD's (which are really outdated technology).
     
  6. kenny1999

    kenny1999 Notebook Evangelist

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    is 4TB currently the best value per MB for 2.5 portable hard drive
     
  7. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    It's now probably the best value given that 5TB is available so 4TB no longer carries a price premium due to having the highest capacity. It's easy to do the cost/ TB calculation.

    John
     
  8. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Just ordered the 5TB seagate 15mm drive for 130 USD to see if it will fit in my optical bay of my Ranger
     
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  9. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    i always suspected that DTR laptops always had way more space than just for 9mm hard drives... ;) good find!
     
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  10. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Confirmed fits perfectly and works in the Ranger R1
     
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  11. msintle

    msintle Notebook Consultant

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    You can use software like DiskZIP to max out drive capacity using compression, which also accelerates disk read speeds.

    On my data disk with mostly incompressible/pre-compressed videos and music, the compression ratio is 1.2:1, which gives you roughly 200 GB on the terabyte.

    On my boot disk with mostly compressible program files and data, the space saving is 1.5:1, which gives you half an extra terabyte for each uncompressed TB.

    Considering it also accelerates disk read speeds (even on NVMe SSDs, but especially on slower SSD and HDDs), its a win-win scenario.
     
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  12. Starlight5

    Starlight5 So what if I'm crazy? The best people are.

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    Shopping for a 2.5" HDD now, found out that some of the 4TB Seagate drives are 5-platter like 5TB, while others are 4-platter. I would honestly prefer a 4-platter/8-head drive for more reliability, but since buying a 4TB drive is a lottery - maybe I should just get a 5-platter/10 head 5TB drive. \=
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
  13. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    While I love things like this on the fly disk compression software, I've been burned enough that I don't use them any longer. Make sure you have backups for the important stuff on a non-compressed disk :)

    With such high volume storage available for cheap these days, it seems hardly worth it...I used to restore after corruption thinking it was still worth it, until around the 5th time.

    Then I had a hardware accelerated compression card, which improved reliability somewhat, as it had battery backup on it and recovery at boot to complete writes interrupted, but after that wasn't supported in newer versions of Windows, newer larger drives were available, so I forgot about it until seeing your post.

    I hope it works reliably for you, and Windows is stable enough to keep it going without corruption. If you run into problems please post a follow up.
     
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  14. msintle

    msintle Notebook Consultant

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    Thank you very much for your concern. I've been using this software for just about two years now and no issues.

    In fact, its saved me a couple times from malware/ransomware infections thanks to its built-in System Refresh functionality (goes back to the last time you had optimized the system).

    DiskZIP does not recommend on-the-fly compression, because doing so degrades disk performance very substantially. This software is primarily intended for disk acceleration, with the secondary (but very tangible) benefit of extra disk space, and malware protection as icing on the cake.

    Could you clarify what software you are referring to? I haven't heard of hardware accelerated compression cards in almost 30 years! That sounds from an era long bygone.

    I've never heard of a hardware accelerated compression card with a built-in backup feature though, not even from 30 years ago.
     
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