When is a laptop too heavy?

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by MellowG, Jun 11, 2008.

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  1. KernalPanic

    KernalPanic White Knight

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    Go find a 10lb bag or dumbbell.
    If you cannot lift it with one hand EASILY then get thee to a gym ASAP.

    (male/female makes no difference, my 5'1" wife lifts my 9.2lbs laptop very easily)

    People are spoiled.

    I carried over 80lbs of diffyQ, dynamics, fluids, and other miscellaneous books, laptop, and supplies running all day all over campus.
    It never seemed like much weight at all.

    My laptop is 9.2lbs and I carry it everywhere now in and out of server rooms and meeting rooms.

    Honestly the ONLY downside to the larger laptops has nothing to do with the miniscule weight difference. Its the bulk of the laptop that sometimes makes me wish for the smaller XPS 1530 a few feet from me. One look at its inferior screen and I am cured.
     
  2. Lithus

    Lithus NBR Janitor

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    There's quite a difference between being able to do something, and wanting to do it.

    I'm pretty sure you have the ability to jump off a bridge as well. Probably with your eyes closed and by only using one leg to jump.
     
  3. phy

    phy Notebook Consultant

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    actually some of my classes require me to have a computer (aka powerpoints w/ fill in the blanks)

    but as to the thread's question... this is your first laptop? my last laptop i found was a bit too heavy... something that is 5lb or less is the perfect weight imo... when you start out, you may think its nothing, but as you go on with the laptop on your back or hanging on your shoulder, you'll start to notice the weight.
     
  4. surfasb

    surfasb Titles Shmm-itles

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    So true. So true.

    I would of bought a scooter, just so I don't come into class sweating like GI JOE with a rucksack on my back.
     
  5. chrixx

    chrixx Product Specialist NBR Reviewer

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    I bring a laptop to class to work on my assignments while following lectures, hence it's a great tool to have.
     
  6. drbiff

    drbiff Notebook Geek

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    I take my 17 inch laptop to some classes and meetings. Not terribly easy to do. Personally when the weight of the laptop, powerbrick, and accessories exceeds 10 lb I find that I leave it sitting on my desk most of the time. Anything under 5 lb is very portable. I'm thinking about getting an ultraportable for class, trips, etc., but having 2 notebooks is an expensive solution. I have friends with Sony VAIO notebooks and Dell XPS 1330's that they take to class and are very happy with them.
     
  7. Kittie Rose

    Kittie Rose Notebook Evangelist

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    A laptop in class actually helped me in some cases because I have no attention span, I can actually concentrate better by alternating between the two. I don't think being forced to sit down and stare for an hour at a lecture is all that healthy.

    But then again I have pretty severe ADD so I may be different. In some more complicated lectures I felt it may have made be suffer a little though.
     
  8. Kittie Rose

    Kittie Rose Notebook Evangelist

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    How about an ASUS EEE-PC? They cost next to nothing.

    I'm out of college now so I'm thinking of getting a 16" laptop, still fairly portable.
     
  9. KernalPanic

    KernalPanic White Knight

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    See here's the thing... if you do something long enough you get used to it and it becomes less and less of a problem until you barely notice it.

    I didn't walk in drenched in sweat most of the time.
    (the night class after hockey practice a notable exception... but I didn't have either my computer or my books with me in that case)

    The simple truth is that some college textbooks will weigh more than any of these laptops (especially if you are a math/science/engineering major) and odds are you will have at least a couple classes back-to-back that both require the textbook.

    Boom! Despite the best-laid plans of mice and men you are already carrying 20+ lbs, and a bag or backpack of some sort regardless of which notebook computer you buy.

    If you live off-campus, expect to be carrying more than two books.
    (thus my example)

    Also, if you have half a brain you buy a bag or backpack for your laptop to protect it. (regardless of how proud of a mac user you are or how nice the mac laptops are... they are NOT waterproof... and I say this due to having to explain this to TWO mac users already this year!)

    On your back or shoulder, if you even remotely notice the 2-4lb difference of a lightweight laptop over a 17", then you probably are too weak to carry your books or go to college in the first place.

    This is NOT to say a lighter and less-bulky machine doesn't have its place, but that the weight issue is significantly less of an issue than most make it here... at least for me personally.


    In Lithus' place, I can't really understand why he would be jumping off a bridge in the first place... but I can understand why he might want to carry a lighter laptop and perhaps if he sat down and thought about it he might understand why I would choose to carry a slightly heavier one?

    The thing is, what do you give up for what you gain?

    For a lousy few lbs of weight that the vast majority of healthy college-age people are not going to notice in most situations you gain the following:
    -Larger (and likely superior) screen
    -Larger keyboard (less cramped)
    -Actual Numpad
    -More room for better hardware (and better gaming)
    -Better cooling
    -Better comfort in computing on your lap
    -Easier and more likely repair

    Note, I already mentioned that size is the actual downfall here.

    Smaller IS nice for setting the laptop down and using it in crowded "lecture hall" classrooms, but I gotta say most of those classes you don't really WANT to bring a laptop. Bring a pad of paper and a pen/pencil and NOTHING else if you can help it. (Textbook also if necessary)

    Smaller IS also nice if you plan on flying.


    All the rest is personal preference IMHO...
    (I suggest you skip the jumping off a bridge thing.)
     
  10. Kittie Rose

    Kittie Rose Notebook Evangelist

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    Again, get a heavier laptop and save up for an ASUS EEE-PC, even the cheapest would be fine for note taking, internet browsing etc. Maybe a costly solution but a good one, I think. Different levels of portability can help.
     
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