What notebook are you currently using? What drew you to it?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by H.A.L. 9000, May 7, 2017.

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  1. H.A.L. 9000

    H.A.L. 9000 Occam's Chainsaw

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    And don't say something like "specs specs specs...". Also, now that you've probably used it for a bit, does it meet expectations?

    I'm currently using a 2015 rMBP 15". Personally, I've never had a problem with my Apple notebooks. They always just work, they're built well, and I basically got it for half off. I have to admit mine was an open-box, but it was in like new condition. Once I bought it I figured out why the previous owner had returned it... the touchpad was having seizures from time to time. Turned out to be the flex cable, and after Apple had repaired it, it's basically flawless. As for expectations, it's a MacBook. Not much other than it works and it's what I've always used. It is a very nice piece of kit though.

    Personally, I can't stand the build quality of most other notebooks, and the trackpads... dear god the trackpads. Nothing in the Windows world holds a candle.

    What about you guys?
     
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  2. Galm

    Galm "Stand By, We're Analyzing The Situation!"

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    Clevo P650RS.

    Wanted power that was still portable. I also liked the subtle design. Still do, it's awesome. Build quality is very good, the trackpad and keyboard exceeded my expectations.


    Also about your notebook, that's like the last MBP I may ever like. The new MBP's can't even cool themselves and are just unbelievably expensive for the hardware inside. Plus literally everything is soldered now so any problems are crazy expensive to fix outside of warranty.
     
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  3. H.A.L. 9000

    H.A.L. 9000 Occam's Chainsaw

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    Nice! I Googled some pictures of it and I have to say that's one of the few gaming notebooks I'd have myself. So hard to find a gaming notebook that doesn't look like a complete eyesore. And yea, I agree. I plan on keeping this 2015 model for as long as I can. I held onto my last MacBook Air for almost 5 years (2012 13" Air). Never gave me any problems, but this year the SSD died. Can't really blame it. I was really really heavy on IO for the last two years I used it. It never complained in the slightest, and if I were to replace the SSD, it would work again right now!
     
  4. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    ASUS M60J
    Bought it back in 2009. Eight years later it's still kickin'.
    The reasons I bought it was...yes, specs, namely a brand new Intel i7 720QM CPU. In the country it was one of the few models available with that CPU at the time. Price also seemed right.
    It has served me well and still does. Did a lot of gaming, uni work, etc. Surprised that after so many years it's still alive, though I try to take care of it as much as I can (I'm a strong believer in "if you take care of something, it will take care of you). Currently use it for occasional CAD/FEM and as my drumming side kick (watch drumming videos, play song to jam along to). Once I upgrade my drums, I may use it for EZdrummer. I may also upgrade it with an SSD, because 5400 RPM HHDs are slow...
    Is it perfect? No. Touchpad is small (at the time manufacturers still haven't went for Apple's touchpad size), though the work I usually did/do is not suitable for a touchpad. Screen also sucks. I can live with HD resolution, but I hate TN. Especially after getting used to my Dell U2412M and ASUS T100TA. Takes some adjusting when I start using this laptop. Anything else? Well, media bar is kinda useless, but otherwise a good laptop.

    ASUS T100TA

    Needed something light and with good battery to carry to university on daily basis.
    Bought it in 2014, I think. Battery life is still pretty good, though performance seems to be worse on Windows 10 than it was back on Windows 8. Small RAM size has become very noticeable over years.
    Still, good for uni stuff (did a lot of homework/projects, AutoCAD drawings, some MATLAB) and light gaming (DOOM, Vice City, LISA).
     
  5. Datamonger

    Datamonger Notebook Evangelist

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    Sager NP5855. I didn't exactly need a new laptop, but I wanted something a little newer than my old Lenovo Y50 as well as one that supported more than one storage device. The Sager had the specs and price that I wanted, so it became my new gaming laptop.
     
  6. Starlight5

    Starlight5 W I N T E R B O R N

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    Thinkpad Yoga 260. Bought it couple months ago, because it can have all the features I want in a laptop - after a bit of work.

    It's a compact, thin and light convertible with pen&touch input, bright IPS display without PWM, decent keyboard with trackpoint - yet very upgradeable; also, it's a reliable and repairable business-class machine with parts easy to source and service manual readily available, and very cheap compared to competition. I am building a dream laptop out of it - already got LTE modem and antennas for it, and WiGiG docking station - waiting for WiGiG antenna & Intel 18260 to arrive, then I'll reassemble it with new parts. RAM and SSD will be upgraded sooner or latter, too. Battery life could be better, but since it is on par with the machines I used before (5-6 hours of wi-fi surfing), I can live with that.
     
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  7. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    My main home device is my Alienware 17 R3. I use it for gaming and all my Adobe Creative Cloud needs (you'd be surprised how my CPU/GPU power Illustrator needs). I had an Alienware M17x R2 before this. I used and abused it until it didn't want to boot anymore. I got my M17x as a systems exchange for my regular old Dell XPS back in 2009 and haven't looked back ever since. If I didn't have an Alienware, I would have probably gone with a Sager or an Asus ROG.

    My skool device is my Surface Pro 4. I use it for Onenote, Onenote, and all Onenote. I do use my tablet for the rest of Office and Adobe CC, but the last check on my usage, Onenote leads all other apps with 99% CPU usage time.
     
  8. PatchySan

    PatchySan Om Noms Kit Kat

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    2011 Lenovo ThinkPad T420 from new, still using it now. It's sturdy, easy to maintain if needed (I don't even need to look at the maintenance manual anymore as I opened it so many times), cheap to get spares parts as so many get junked from IT leases but most importantly for me it has the Trackpoint and Classic 7-row keyboard that I know and use. My productivity goes to pot with the chiclet style keys and trackpad hence I'm keeping hold of this one for a while (well until they release that rumoured Retro ThinkPad).

    Performance wise it still holds up my daily tasks really well, still fast enough for things like YouTube HD, mass internet browser tab sessions and graphical software such as Photoshop but that's probably because I've maxed out the RAM (16GB) and having a SSD on board since I had it.

    My first and current T420 costed me about £811 back in the day, I've had 10 more T420's since then which are bought cheaply since most of them are in poor or junked condition (on average each costed me about £75 in all). My most recent purchase as of last week costed me £50 with a busted screen, but it works and I'm in the process of restoring it with a cheap easy screen swap. As I work in a charity most of these T420's are restored by myself and gets used by child refugees to learn about computer software and office packages. Though I've kept 3 for myself with each residing in my different offices so I've always got at least one ThinkPad on standby if I needed it!
     
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  9. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Having used a 2011 MacBook Pro as my daily driver for 4+ years, it was time for a change. My PS3 was at the end of its useful life as gaming device (still use it for movies and living room streaming), so I wanted to get full-on back into PC gaming. I had originally purchased a Clevo P775DM3 with an i7 6700K and GTX 1080. It was certainly fast, but the cooling system was not up to scratch. It ran hot at idle and would thermal throttle under heavy load. This is probably why HIDevolution only sells this machine with de-lidded CPUs enhanced with liquid metal compound. I thought about moving up to the better-cooled P870, but that would have been very pricey.

    Instead, I opted to "downgrade" to the P670RS, with an i7 6820HK and GTX 1070. It was still a huge upgrade over the i7 2860QM/Radeon 6770M that was in the MacBook Pro. It has a lot of power in a comparatively thin and reasonably light package. It's easy to upgrade the storage and RAM. There's no modular CPU or GPU, but that's what the 3-year hardware warranty is for. Most of time, it's connected to my external 4K monitor, and a lot of the older games I play (from OG Deus Ex to Human Revolution and more) look and play beautifully at that resolution. The display also downscales to 1080p extremely well, so newer titles that don't play as well at 4K will be fine for the future. This is all without overclocking, which if/when the Prema BIOS I paid for is ever released, will be something to try.

    My other notebooks are less interesting. The Yoga 2 Pro is primarily used by my wife. Once she started using the touchscreen, she won't get another computer without it. I just replaced an Intel Celeron Lenovo N21 Chromebook with an ARM-based Lenovo Flex 11. There are some things about the N21 I like more, but the Flex is noticeably faster overall and has more onboard storage, so I'm going to stick with it.

    My work-issue laptop is a 2015 13-inch MacBook Pro. I don't list it in my sig because it's not my property.
     
  10. aaronne

    aaronne Notebook Evangelist

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    Running from 2012 a m18x R2 that originally came with 12 month warranty from Dell's refurbished line.
    Just 3 gpus died on it (7970m) (in the meantime and first I own from Commodore to 4930K and from Acer's laptop to Dell's XPS series). On my poor hands this laptop was and be the best (in therm of cooling/performance/usabilty)

    Brief list of not mobile:
    Commodore Vic20
    Intel x386 and dx2/66mhz
    Pentium100
    k6-2 3dnow 350mhz
    PentiumII (slot1)
    Pentium4 (sk478)
    Core2quad e Xeon (sk775 chipset nforce)
    I7 (sk1366, sk1155, sk2011)

    Laptops, I list only the one that I liked more for various reason time to time:
    Dell:
    2x XPS 15 (nvidia 8600m GT version),
    m1730 (8800m GTX SLI)
    m17x R4
    m11x R3
    2x m18x R2 (current system)

    Acer:
    5920g
    5930g

    HP:
    6930p (14.1")

    So now that my salary is very low I've only upgraded 970m on my main rig and arranging to buy a 1060m near next weeks.

    Always looking here at forum with interest. :cool:

    Regards
     
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