What is your ideal laptop?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by Omexis, Jul 14, 2016.

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  1. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    If you are not someone who intends to fiddle with the gpu/cpu it does not matter if you have a decent warranty to back you up :)
     
  2. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

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    What would you do with modular components?
     
  3. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    Not throw out the entire notebook when one component breaks? lol.
    i.e. The inevitable GPU burnout.
     
  4. darkarn

    darkarn Notebook Evangelist

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    Not sure what you mean by that

    Erm, upgrade them I suppose? :D (Unless the prices aren't good that is...)
     
  5. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

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    That's interesting! I ask because, typically, a replacement motherboard on some systems runs about as much as a replacement CPU or a GPU. Wanting the potential for upgrading, I understand.
     
  6. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    I'm the type that likes to do my own repairs (which is a good thing since I am an engineer lol), one of my biggest pet peeves in the industry is forced upgrades. Socketed GPUs are easier to repair than the BGA nonsense. That said, I have access to a high end BGA machine, so if anyone thinks they're forcing me to upgrade, they should think again. I routinely send broken GPUs to nVidia and AMD along with a strongly worded letter. It'll never go to the person that it was intended to reach, but it is a good way to vent. Especially when your company spent $6000 on a Quadro and the damn thing lasts 37 months of useage.

    EDIT: It's more about choice than cost. Bigger companies (like the one I work for) are not as cost sensitive, but if you force them to upgrade (even if its a laptop), there's more frustration in having to replace validated parts with something new than simply repairing it. Validation work is tedious and boring, and nobody enjoys doing it. If you force it on people, well... pitchforks and torches are just around the corner.
     
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  7. darkarn

    darkarn Notebook Evangelist

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    I am with Krowe on this!
     
  8. darkarn

    darkarn Notebook Evangelist

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    I am with Krowe on this!
     
  9. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    To people who would not open their computer it makes no difference if it's BGA or not as they would never open it.
     
  10. Prototime

    Prototime Notebook Evangelist

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    Definitely the vast majority of people fit into this category. Just yesterday, I successfully replaced a hard drive in a BGA laptop that had crashed (second time I had ever attempted a hardware replacement, the first was a different laptop's screen a few years back), and it was definitely nice to spend only $45 on an HDD instead of buying a whole new computer. So I certainly see the appeal of modularity in laptops. But I also don't think the vast majority of people would want completely modular laptops, especially considering most people buy pretty cheap laptops to begin with - the hassle and cost of buying parts for replacements/upgrades just wouldn't make sense. I myself would prefer a mostly-BGA laptop because I want something light, small, and portable, which I understand are features that don't mix well with modularity.

    Still, I like the idea of modular laptops, even though they seem to be on the decline. One can always dream of an inexpensive, small, light laptop that's totally modular though. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2016
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