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What is the point of an access point?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by dwd, Oct 20, 2008.

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  1. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe Mime with Tourette's

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    I have a D-Link DWL G730 AP which can be used in several different modes (via a switch), one of which is Access Point mode. I have used it in that mode when travelling when there is already a router in place, but no wireless.
     
  2. makaveli72

    makaveli72 Eat.My.Shorts

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    Right, makes sense...you can also use an AP and create a wireless network with a wired modem/router that doesn't have wireless features.
     
  3. dwd

    dwd Notebook Consultant

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  4. blue68f100

    blue68f100 Notebook Virtuoso

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    A AP is used to connect wirelessly. In most cases you want a wireless router to start off with. You can then add a AP or wireless router setup as a AP to extend your coverage. Most AP are multifunction, meaning they support many modes, client, bridge, multi-bridge, repeater. These features are only supported by third party firmware (dd-wrt) on some routers. Meaning MFG do not want these functions, hurts them on sale of other hardware.

    Most business use AP if they want to setup a wireless network on their facility. They will set them up so you can roam all over the facility and not need to login every time you move out of range of your current AP. It is so seamless you will not even know you changed AP.
     
  5. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe Mime with Tourette's

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    Also, most modems that the ISPs provide are really Modem+Router combos. Some are even Modem+Wireless Router combos.

    You can put a second router after the ISPs router, but if you do you probably should set the ISPs router to be in "bridge mode".
     
  6. Wirelessman

    Wirelessman Monkeymod

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    And if you have fiber to the house, you don't even have a modem.
     
  7. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe Mime with Tourette's

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    Not possible here yet, but makes sense: No need to MOdulate-DEModulate (convert analog to digital) if it comes in digitally in the first place.
     
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