what is the main reason of credit card information getting stolen

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by kenny1999, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. kenny1999

    kenny1999 Notebook Evangelist

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    I am not a computer expert but I believe that I have enough common sense to never enter my credit card details or confidential personal information to any sites that are suspicious. I also always avoid buying things on un-trusted shopping site. However, over the past 4 years, since late 2013, my credit card was
    charged without my authorization for two times, in 2013 and 2016. I wasn't notified until I checked the statement and found out something wrong. I told the bank and they told me that they would investigate and give me paper report but at the end of the day they always just simply canceled or deleted the corresponding charges but they never actually gave me any report, nor just telling me on the phone what happened. I called them, they just delayed delayed and delayed and just said, OK, your charge is cancelled.... without any explanation about what happened.

    Since 2018, they have even stopped mailing me paper statement because of environmental reasons, I can only check my statements online and their site is not very user-friendly. Sometimes I just want to cancel the credit card to avoid all the mess and risks but it's really so convenient that I can't live without it in today's world. I have been thinking why it happened from time to time, while my physical card was never stolen. Probably the most risky thing I did so far was sending my credit card details (that includes my name, card number, expiry dates and three-digits code ) to someone in Europe, in the email, but I sent the details in several emails, separately, which was strongly recommended by the merchant, and the merchant was doing real sales and I believe I could trust them.

    Was it the main reason? He took my details and sold to the criminals?
     
  2. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    Maybe not him, but that merchant has to use a payment processor somewhere. Those have been successfully hit before. Should those CC scanners be storing all of that information? Hell no. But in the end, some still do.

    Furthermore, you still sent your info via email. Even if your merchant wasn't malicious, an email breach would still compromise your info. Even if he deleted every email (laughable), it could still happen.
     
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  3. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    The merchant itself could have been compromised, the processor could have been compromised, you could have entered your CC details into a malicious website (even if you were careful; scammers are a really crafty group), you’re too trusting of people online (as evident in your post), etc.

    And as said before, you *sent CC details in an insecure communication (email) to some random person online*....

    (Btw, any sane and knowledge merchant would never, ever ask you to send sensitive information via email)
     
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  4. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    This^^^

    I'm kind of iffy when it comes to using CC's online but there is no way I would ever send sensitive information over email. Just seems that Email servers are an easy target for hackers.
     
  5. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    I’m perfectly fine with using credit cards online (especially as opposed to debit cards or the like). Just have to have some sort of knowledge of what’s safe and what isn’t, and even if you do land in a bad situation like having a malicious charge, you are generally not responsible for it and can have the card company remove the charges (which is good enough for me; I don’t care how it happened so long as it’s corrected).
     
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  6. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    Many cards issued by Citibank have support for "virtual" account numbers, which are one-time-use numbers generated by their website or a desktop app. You then input those when shopping online, and if there happens to be a data breach, your actual credit card is not vulnerable.
     
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