What is the cheapest way to buy a car long run?

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by Thundr, Jul 3, 2012.

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  1. Thundr

    Thundr Notebook Evangelist

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    Buying 90s small Toyota/Honda car?
     
  2. MINIz guy

    MINIz guy Notebook Consultant

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    A reliable car with a good service history. That way, you know it has been cared for and you don't get hit with the depreciation.
     
  3. bsmack

    bsmack Notebook Enthusiast

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    I interpreted this as leasing/financing/buying outright. I would say unless your credit is immaculate and you get a phenomenal rate, buying outright will always be cheaper in the long run.

    Leasing should only be for if you want to drive a new car every x years. It only really "works" if you're rich and should be considered a luxury.

    Financing a car can be better than buying outright if you are smart and invest the money somewhere.
     
  4. __-_-_-__

    __-_-_-__ God

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    in a long run the cheap can became very expensive. there are many factors.

    you have to consider how many km are you planing to do each year.
    how many years are you going to use it.
    the cost of the car.
    the price of reselling the car.
    the fuel consumption.
    the fuel price.
    the tyres, the mechanics, fluids, breaks costs etc etc

    basically you have to figure out the total cost of ownership.
    it's way much more then just the price of the car.
     
  5. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    Yes 90's Japanese cars are probably some of the most reliable cars that aren't horrid on fuel (90's Porsches and Volvos are tanks too, but miserable on fuel).

    Do a tuneup on a car, it makes a WORLD of difference. I changed my fuel filter, that was literally 5 MPG because my 240SX old one was CLOGGED with dirt, I'll need to flush my gas tank when I do my swap. I'd recommend fuel filter, spark plugs, distributor, rotor, cap, engine oil, transmission fluid flush.
     
  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Aside from the comments above, you could also look into buying a certified pre-owned car from a dealership. I have a '05 Altima CPO and I'm the third driver on it (originally a rental car, then bought as a CPO for my mom, and now I drive it) and I've had no major mechanical faults so far (almost 80k miles).

    Other than that, have a mechanic inspect the car if you're not 100% comfortable (I probably would only bother with a used car, not CPO), don't buy cheap old luxuries (for example, trying to maintain an old BMW will be hell), and stick to simple cars.
     
  7. Thaenatos

    Thaenatos Zero Cool

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    Most jeeps, fords with the 4.6/5.0/5.4/5.8, most hondas. Other then that I wouldnt waste my time.
     
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