What chromebook to buy?

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by Drew1, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Evangelist

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    Got another question. So when you first sign into the account, you need a current gmail account in order to log in correct? So does this mean if you have several gmail accounts, if you log into one account... then log off and log into another one, any files you have in the first account is not there if you decide to log into another account? Also aren't there security issues since you are logging into your google accounts? I had thought it was like you start it up like a regular windows computer or you give yourself a username and maybe put a password. Can someone explain this?
     
  2. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    You might be better off asking this in the Chrome OS and Software subforum.
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    You only needed to follow the link and read the article to answer your question, I hope you did just that, but in case you didn't, here is an example for the line item Web Browsing in the chart, answering your other question:
    Web Browsing
    Chrome is a great browser that offers strong performance, a clean and easy-to-use interface, and a ton of extensions. But if you own a machine running Chrome OS, you better really like it, because there aren't any alternatives. The Chrome browser on Chrome OS cannot run Flash or other important plugins, such as Java, meaning that sometimes, you will run into compatibility problems when trying to view certain websites or select extensions.

    [​IMG]

    On the other hand, Windows 10 can also run Chrome, along with pretty much every other web browser ever made, giving you the flexibility to surf the internet exactly how you want to. Microsoft's new browser, Edge, also has some handy features not found in Chrome, such as the ability to write directly on websites and send those notes and scribbles to friends; Cortana search embedded on the same page; and a reading mode that removes distracting elements like ads and saves articles so they can be viewed offline.

    [​IMG]

    Winner: Windows 10. Chrome is good, but Windows 10 lets you use Chrome along with a bunch of other web browsers. Choice is king.

    Just because Chrome does things, it doesn't mean it does them best, and that's the purpose of the chart, to check off items that each do best. :)
    foo.jpg
    @Drew1

    I'm no fan of Windows in general, or Windows 10 in specific (I don't run it myself), but knowing what ChromeOS could have been - what Android can still become, I can't see living with the limitations of ChromeOS in the hopes that it evolves when I can have far more functionality today with a Windows or Linux OS.

    But, all of these insights take many years of experience, which I wouldn't have arrived at without going through all of these experiences myself, as you are doing, but when you ask the question as you did I gave the answer you asked for, at least I hope I gave you some useful insights to think about. :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
  4. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Eh, I did read the article and it’s basically just an opinion piece by the author as to what OS they like. It’s really nothing better than the classic “Mac v PC” style of comparisons of yore.
     
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  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    What did you expect? Did you expect long detailed investigations with instrumented results, charts with numbers - showing % better or worse?

    If the non-technical person wanted that kind of response, they would have done the research themselves, otherwise they wouldn't understand the detailed answers.

    It's written to the level of the kind of person interested in a quick answer, plain statements of what to compare and some simple reasoning as to why which is better.

    That's all they need, and if you read it as an experienced person trying to help a non-technical person arrive at a realization of what matters in a comparison, it's a good article.

    They can form their own opinions by spending a great deal of time on each component of the comparison, or they can save time and follow the quick and simple recommendation to get a Windows laptop, and not worry about it, or spend any more time thinking about it.

    Which is why they ask this kind of question in the first place, they don't want to or don't have the time to spend digging in deeply to get a definitive answer. Which would result in the same answer given by the quick comparison with simple explanations given by an experienced person to a non-technical person.

    The Mac vs PC comparisons which are like this got tougher and tougher to help decide which one to get as each grew by incorporating features of the other.

    With the ChromeOS vs Windows comparison, it is much more clear cut at this point in time which is the better choice - for value, capability, flexibility, and skills learned that can be converted to valuable use in business, education, and every day use. :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    You cannot really expect very much for $250 unless you buy a really decent older used laptop for a lower than average price. I'm thinking along the lines of an off-lease business class notebook (Latitude for example) that is pretty old, but in good condition and with specs that were respectable back when it was new (like a 2nd or 3rd generation Core i7) and a minimum of 4GB of RAM. I would not purchase anything with less than a 1080p screen if you can avoid it, even if that means settling for slightly lower specs on some other things.

    The most compelling thing about a Chromebook is getting something that does a decent job of web browsing for a whole lot less than a full-featured laptop if you do not need a full-featured laptop. It beats a tablet for a simple web browsing device if for no reason other than having a keyboard instead of having to use a crappy touch screen. If you buy a high end Chromebook (which is kind of an oxymoron if you stop and think about it) then you might as well buy an ordinary notebook. Chrome OS and Android are not bad operating systems if their functional limitations are not important, but there are some things that go along with inexpensive Chromebooks that are not particularly good, such as poor quality and low resolution screens, slow processors, inadequate system memory and low capacity flash storage.

    To a significant extent you will get what you pay for. If you don't pay much, then you won't get much in return unless you buy used or refurbished and profit from someone else's massive loss on depreciation.
     
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  7. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    As of 2016, ChromeOS holds a nearly 60% share in the K-12 education sector. And with Google Play available on new, current, and past devices, they are becoming an increasingly viable alternative for what many would consider "every day use" (browsing, audio/video streaming, light office work).
     
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  8. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Evangelist

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    Hi there. Well many sites apparently use flash and java when i viewed certain sites. So if thats the case, would that mean streaming sites certain ones won't work then? That would be my main issue because im planning to stream. I recalled several streaming sites need flash or something similar etc.


    Are you telling me an acer 14 chromebook is faster or slower than windows laptops that use say intel celeron or pentium processor then? Because when i read the review for those cheaper windows laptops, its bad. But for chromebook its very good etc.
     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    You'll only know by going to the sites, or googling might work too, and ChromeOS specific forms on other sites - or here, find the ChromeOS threads, or open a new one in that forum as suggested earlier.

    BTW, this is case in point for learning curve and it's application of what you learn to day to day life. The effort you put in to learning ChromeOS - limitations in this case - is expertise you can apply to work and school if they use ChromeOS. If you were spending the same time learning Windows it would in my experience have a much higher percentage of chance of being useful in the "real world". Same for this next item...

    You asked about multiple login's, googling found a number of links for you to read, some will apply some won't and dig beyond the first page or change the search terms a bit to find what you need:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=managing+multiple+logins+on+chromeos

    As far as the performance, there are different levels of expectation if you are talking about ChromeOS vs Windows.

    On ChromeOS you are really only talking about web sites and services ChromeOS performs, and most people are going to be more forgiving for "slowness" since they expect less for Chromebooks in general - cheap, lower configurations of memory and CPU / GPU, and the reviewers know that within what is available in the range of performance they have to scale down their expectations.

    On Windows the range of available hardware is from super low end ATOM CPU's, but all the way up to desktop CPU's, so if you are comparing the performance of a Windows laptop with the same CPU / GPU as a Chromebook in it, the reviewer won't be as kind to the performance results on Windows.

    And, since the Windows laptop will run all of Windows software - within it's memory and storage limits - it's easy to overload the low-end CPU / GPU to it's limits quickly, bogging it down. And, since the Windows laptop will run those Java, and "Windows only" extensions, it will tax the CPU / GPU that much harder than the ChromeOS laptop that is rendering the page but not running the extensions.

    Different scales for comparison make it not so comparable in review results between ChromeOS and Windows laptops :)

    Have you opened your new Chromebook and checked out some of those streaming sites?

    It looks like Netflix might work(?) on newer Chromebooks / ChromeOS and updated older models:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=netflix+chromebook+chromeOS

    Can You Play Netflix on a Chromebook?
    Despite a rough start, Netflix runs seamlessly on current Chromebooks
    Updated March 19, 2018
    https://www.lifewire.com/netflix-on-chromebook-1616473

    Again, better answered on ChromeOS / Chromebook forums :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
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