VPC-Z Change Thermal Paste

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by Ricefields, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. timwjohn

    timwjohn Notebook Enthusiast

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    @ToniCipriani sounds like a pad/paste replacement case to me. Try runing Open Hardware Monitor to see which component is overheating. Does the same thing happen when in stamina mode? If so, then it's likely the CPU, if not then it's likely the GPU. If CPU, then you can throttle the laptop power in Windows Advanced Power Settings until you get the paste/shim, usually only 10% reduction will prevent an overheat.
     
  2. ToniCipriani

    ToniCipriani Notebook Consultant

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    Problem is we can't even get the machine running long enough to launch a hardware monitor, or for me to use an offline password tool to get in. Friend can't remember the password, he only uses the fingerprint.

    It is however better in Stamina mode, but eventually the same thing happens and it shuts down.
     
  3. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Deity

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    If the air coming out is hot, the thermal paste is probably fine. If you can feel the hot air 4 to 6 inches away from the vent, the fan and air passages are fine too. You will eventually need to clean the fan and air passages - the laptop should be able to run under full load without shutting down, e.g. while playing games - but that is not your immediate problem.

    You need to find out the CPU usage and what process is causing the massive load. Task Manager should give you a clue (remember to click 'show processes from all users). ProcessExplorer from Sysinternals is probably the best.

    Once you have found the process(es) causing the high CPU usage and hence the heating, you can figure out what to do about it. Could be malware; could be a badly configured driver or software; could be some useless bloatware. Ask the guys here for help if you get stuck.
     
  4. ToniCipriani

    ToniCipriani Notebook Consultant

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    It's not a process. I tried booting from a live USB Linux (Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS) and leaving it in the BIOS, it still heats up like crazy. Only when booted into Windows (at the login screen) and in Stamina mode it's marginally better.

    EDIT: On second try after re-reading your post, I'm leaning once again on the thermal material. At 4-6 inches away, air feels cool.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2015
  5. ToniCipriani

    ToniCipriani Notebook Consultant

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    Silly question here. I just got some Fujipoly 0.5mm pads (6W/mK) to replace the GPU pad, but I loaned out my thermal grease to a friend and he didn't give it back to me yet. Out of laziness is it OK to use the pad for both the CPU and GPU, or is it going to be too thick and lift the heatsink? And I just realized the pad actually has slightly better thermal performance than my grease (Arctic MX-2, 5.4W/mK), I misplaced my AS5.
     
  6. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Deity

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    Absolutely NOT OK. The CPU and GPU are at different levels in the VPCZ1, which is why the GPU pad is much thicker than what one would normally expect. I would advise you to wait for the grease, or get something else locally. I have found that even the cheap generic white thermal paste gives decent results on the CPU - never needed to use anything else. The GPU is the tricky animal, but you have that covered.
     
  7. timwjohn

    timwjohn Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi @TonyCipriani. I used a 0.5mm Phobya XT pad with a conductivity of 7W/mk on my GPU first, and it just didn't do the job. The GPU overheated almost straight away. I guess it's the thickness that matters. Paste will only be a few microns thick, so that rating will suffice, but not for the pad. Also, you want the CPU paste to be as thin as possible, so I wouldn't recommend a pad.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. timwjohn

    timwjohn Notebook Enthusiast

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    Just looked it up - a copper shim has a thermal conductivity of 385W/mK
     
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  9. ToniCipriani

    ToniCipriani Notebook Consultant

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    Yes, but wouldn't you still be limited by the conductivity of the paste in a way? But I guess since it's only for the irregularity on the surface so actual conductivity is higher.
     
  10. timwjohn

    timwjohn Notebook Enthusiast

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    The paste is only there to fill the microscopic pores on the surface. The rating of the copper will be reduced at each point of contact, but the paste helps minimise the impact.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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