[Video Tutorial] How to repaste laptop with liquid metal to reduce CPU temperatures

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by nravanelli, Jan 18, 2017.

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  1. woodzstack

    woodzstack Alezka Computers , Official Clevo reseller.

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    why would you LM anywhere but the GPU die or CPU die ?
     
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  2. woodzstack

    woodzstack Alezka Computers , Official Clevo reseller.

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    yeah this contact is not always a guarantee, it literally varies from one heatsink to the next enough to make a difference.
     
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  3. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    He pointed out that Liquid Metal *can* end up in other places than where it should be:)
     
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  4. woodzstack

    woodzstack Alezka Computers , Official Clevo reseller.

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    OH haha I misread LOL
     
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  5. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    Yeah I'll add to this. I've only used Liquid Pro and Liquid Ultra.

    I've always used Ultra but I really liked how the Pro spread was a little easier to apply and finished in a nice coat. However, upon inspection of my first application I found a little ball or metal beading around quite far from the die which was the first time I've experienced such a thing. So I'm back on Ultra now.

    Have y'all noticed that... anyone who used metal in a laptop NEVER goes back. "He who dare, wins" I guess.


    @nravanelli

    Nice vid too + Rep
     
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  6. nravanelli

    nravanelli Notebook Enthusiast

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    He who dares to enter reaps the rewards of low thermals.

    Thanks @TBoneSan ! Just trying to start my YouTube channel on a high note :) If anyone has any comments/suggestions for future tutorials - hit me up.

    Feel free to share my video on twitter/facebook, wherever. Exposure is always nice!
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
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  7. Tishers

    Tishers Notebook Consultant

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    Another alternative is to use a thinner version of Fujipoly (30X-m or 50X-m), (0.3 or 0.5mm thickness) instead of Scotch 33 electrical tape. It will compress between the edges of the chip lid and the heat sink, creating a dam that will also minimize any escape of liquid metal. It will require quite a bit of trimming with a razor knife and you may want to create a template for what fits right around the chip lid out of craft paper so you can minimize any seams or gaps when you cut in to the Fujipoly.

    Additionally it will act as another way to "wick" heat away from the CPU PCB. This will be a slight benefit.

    This dam of Fujipoly would keep any liquid metal from escaping, also it is going to keep additional oxygen away from the liquid metal.

    I would suggest measuring the height of the CPU lid and using a "TIM" that is just slightly thicker. Fujipoly is compressible by at least 50% of its thickness (taken from the manufacturers web site for Fujipoly).

    The idea behind liquid metal is to not use it as a gap-filler. The amount you put down on the chip lid and on the heat sink is known as "wetting" and should not be a ball of metal gobbed up on top of the sink. It relies upon the "intimate contact" between the chip-lid and the heat sink. If you have gaps that require a 'filler" then that is a problem you need to resolve way before you start putting any sort of thermal goo or liquid metal down to bridge the gap.

    -------------------
    Something to consider with liquid metals that are based on an eutectic mixture known as galinstan. This is a mixture of gallium, indium and tin where the resulting alloy (combination) has a lower melting point than any of its components (around -20 C for galinstan). Manufacturers can "tweak" the melting point and viscosity by very slight changes in the alloy content of the three primary metals

    One of the negative things about gallium is that it loves to alloy with other base metals as well. This will be most pronounced with something like aluminum where it will literally turn an aluminum heat sink in to brittle little pieces that snap apart like crackers in your fingers in a matter of days. Even with other metals like copper (and nickel to an even lesser extent) is that it does "alloy" with the metal (hence the wetting effect). Normally this would create a tarnish or maybe some minor spalling if there was a poor plating job (the chip lid is actually nickel plated copper but it is a good nickel coating).
     
  8. tijgert

    tijgert Notebook Evangelist

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    I'm a little miffed to have read this thread AFTER I ordered me two syringes of Conductonaut. I was planning on smearing it everywhere in my P775, but it now seems I'd be smart to limit myself to the die-IHS.
    But what could I do best to seal that CPU back up again without it lifting up the IHS or making it impossible for me to repeat the repaste?
    I'm thinking a Fujipoly dam around the die under the IHS and then spotglueing the IHS back on. Might add to the cooling effect and the compressibility of the Fujipoly will keep the IHS snug with the die.

    Thoughts?

    Edit: can I say great minds think alike without sounding cocky? Seems everything I think was in this most excellent previous post.
    Next step will be to decide what to do on top of the IHS... CLU again I suppose is the safest? Or are there any tricks to help there as well?
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2017
  9. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Safest bet is CLU vs. Conductonaut if you haven't a very good fit between IHS and heatsink(less chance for leakage). But all types of liquid metal would make bad temp results if you haven't good fit from heatsink on top of IHS.
     
  10. Tishers

    Tishers Notebook Consultant

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    ----------------------
    Actually what would work better is a non-corrosive silicone adhesive. Those are the types that do NOT smell like vinegar (Acetic Acid).

    When you apply liquid metal to the top of the chip die and to the inside area of the IHS where the die will come in contact you would make a super tiny little track of silicone adhesive along the bottom flat edge of the IHS that will be in contact with the die-carrier. Leave one tiny little gap where there is no adhesive so any internal pressure from the silicone curing process can escape. When the IHS is then applied to the carrier it will smooth flatter and there will not be any cleanup or mess.

    If you use a black silicone adhesive and really nice technique it would be almost impossible to tell the difference between the Intel work and your own in assembling the package.

    I am sure that some people will put the adhesive across the entire mating area of the IHS and 99.99% of the time it will not be a problem. But if you look at the IHS when you first crack it open you will see that they had a tiny gap as well.

    You are not trying to make a "waterproof" seal. If you get water that far inside of your computer then you have lots of other issues going on. The idea is for the IHS to be sitting as close to the die-carrier as possible, not to be moving around and to have most of the space where air can move in and out of the package closed off.
     
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