[Video Tutorial] How to repaste laptop with liquid metal to reduce CPU temperatures

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by nravanelli, Jan 18, 2017.

  1. nravanelli

    nravanelli Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi NBR,

    I just uploaded a video tutorial on how to safely repaste your laptop(s) with liquid metal compounds for beginners. This is extremely easy to follow and pause along. I have broken it down so that any person who would like to achieve thermal bliss can attain. If you do follow the tutorial, or do repaste with liquid metal, leave your results in the comments section or here in this thread.

    Thanks all and I hope your laptops do not overheat :)

     
  2. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    - If you plan on moving your laptop around, would you recommend any liquid metal (LM) between CPU and heatsink?

    If you have a poorly connecting laptop heatsink, and the laptop is on the go being moved, shoved into bags, thrown into an overhead airplane compartment, etc., I think users may want to really think through this decision. Even with the tape around it, leakage can occur. Also, if you use a thin, viscous TIM like Conductonaut, the risk is even greater for the possibility of leakage. Having this stuff get loose and bounce around where it could possibly come in contact with other components inside your case. Yikes!! Let's just say that damage from this is not covered any warranty.

    To me, for the mobile user, I would think it would be best to only use LM inside a delidded CPU, where the CPU has been sealed against possible leakage?
     
  3. nravanelli

    nravanelli Notebook Enthusiast

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    I have been asked this very question in the past, and while I do agree with the viscosity issue and potential 'seepage' out on to the PCB, I have NEVER experienced this before in my 3 prior laptops and desktop that I repasted with LM. Maybe I am a lucky person? I think if the appropriate precautionary measures are taken to avoid any initial excess spewing on to the PCB, you will be ok. If someone else has had this experience, i.e. liquid metal running down on to the motherboard, I would love to hear about it. Electrical tape is one method, which i find easiest, but nail polish is another. with tape, you know exactly what you are covering!

    Secondly, and somewhat aside, traditionally LM was used for delidding and then became used for desktop thermal paste more recently in the overclocking community. Most desktop cases have the motherboard standing vertically, and if gravity were to work it's magic, we would see it leaking on to the motherboard... and we know the rest. However I have yet to hear of such an instance... again, I would not discount someone telling me it happened, but I haven't heard of anyone experiencing this.

    If people do not feel comfortable applying LM, by all means avoid it! I can only speak from experience and I have nothing but great things to say.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
  4. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    I agree with the gravity statement, but a laptop may be subject to a little bit more abuse (thrown into a bag, carried in all types or orientation, screened/jostled at airports, dropped, etc.) Just thinking out loud.

    Also, at least in some laptops, the actual heat sink may have manufacturing flaws (where the sink is not a flat plane), the mounting screws not placing enough pressure on the CPU/GPU to keep the LM in place, or other inconsistencies that should make LM users a bit more cautious.

    I wonder if @Mr. Fox, @Papusan, @Donald@HIDevolution, or @woodzstack have any insight or horror stories regarding LMs usage in other parts of a laptop.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
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  5. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    No horror stories, but I've seen enough that I will only use CLU going forward. I was using Liquid Pro, Phobya Liquid Metal and Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut for a while. With all three of those I found the paste was very watery with no viscosity. I did not think anything about that until later, when I found all three of them had a small trail of liquid metal going across the heat sink (my Clevos are upside down, with the CPU pointing down so gravity pulls toward the heat sink, not the motherboard). That has never once happened to me with CLU, but it is much thicker than the other three. I will not use the other three any more based on my observation. I will always use CLU whenever possible. Had that happened on a laptop with the CPU on top of the motherboard like my Alienware systems were, that trail of liquid metal paste might have gone down into the CPU socket and caused some major devastation and destruction. Seeing it happen more than once, CLU is the only safe option in my own mind.
     
  6. nravanelli

    nravanelli Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for the input! I haven't had issues with conductonaut in the past, but I am a sample of 1.
     
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  7. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $$ on FILTH

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    People are gambling if they use other Liquid metal than Coolaboratory Liquid Ultra. For maybe 1 - highest 2C degrees better cooling isn't the risk worth it. You can't compare a desktop with Liquid metal who sits on the desk vs. laptops who will be used a totally different way. And most of the heatsink in desktops have normally better fit than most part of any heatsink in laptops.
     
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  8. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    Oh, you're totally welcome, bro. I know a couple of other guys saw the same thing. I even made a video showing the three and at that time paying extra for CLU seemed like a waste of money. Now I think the extra cost is worth every dime. Thankfully, nothing bad happened, but it certainly got my attention.

    As a general rule, any liquid metal paste is unbeatable in terms of its effectiveness. They all work amazingly well and are excellent products, but the thick texture of CLU makes it the safest option for a laptop as far as I am concerned. The only caveat with them (including CLU) is the heat sink must fit snugly and make good contact in order to be effective. If the heat sink fit is sloppy (a common encounter for many Clevo owners) it does not work well at all. In fact, in that case IC Diamond is hands-down best. You can use it to plug the gap and get decent results that last a long time where other pastes will quickly fail.
     
  9. nravanelli

    nravanelli Notebook Enthusiast

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    Certainly, my only deciding factor for thermal grizzly conductonaut was its availability at the time of ordering (and past experience). My next paste job will definitely be with CLU based on what you (@Papusan) and @Mr. Fox have said!
     
  10. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $$ on FILTH

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    Nice seeing people listening on others viewpoints. +rep
     
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