Very short fused decision: CPU, i9-9900K vs. Ryzen7 2700X vs. Threadripper 2920X vs ???

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by rlk, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. StormJumper

    StormJumper Notebook Virtuoso

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    The only time you see a real difference in OC'ing is when the speed is 2x the original then you would see gains but micron gains don't justify a dead CPU.
     
  2. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    So, update...so far, so good. I wish I had gotten one of the ASRock TaiChi motherboards with two NICs onboard, but I was in a hurry.

    The Asus Prime X470 Pro motherboard is a bit of a disappointment. When you flash the UEFI you lose all of your settings. I tried saving them to a profile and restoring them, but evidently something wasn't compatible and I soft bricked the mobo (had to short the CMOS pins to recover) and had to re-enter everything. My previous much older ASRock Fatal1ty board handled that stuff a lot better.

    I experimented with OC using Precision Boost Overdrive; it made for a small all-core improvement under load (3.99 GHz vs. 3.93 or so), which translated into not enough improvement to matter. I guess AMD got Precision Boost 2 tuned pretty well, if overclocking setups that don't use really exotic hardware don't accomplish much.

    Well, I have what I have now. Just have to wait and see whether I upgrade the CPU when the Ryzen 3000's come out.
     
  3. Zymphad

    Zymphad Zymphad

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    Get an AM4 board. Doesn't matter if you get 2600, 2700 or 2700x. Whatever fits your budget on the assumption when the 3700x comes, that's what you want. 3700x is should beat the 9900K just about for everything and it's expected price is $350.

    DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON YOUR MOTHERBOARD if you plan to get the 3700x. Get a good board with good VRMs. Rule of thumb, anything less than $150 will have inadequate VRM for maximum effectiveness with AMD XFR / PBO. The VRM on cheaper boards will run too hot and not feed power properly. That includes Asus Prime.

    For more information buildzoid and Gaming Nexus do a great job explaining why you shouldn't be cheap with your motherboard.

    For right now, the boards recommended are ASRock X470 Taichi, Asus Crosshair VII, MSI X470 Pro Carbon or MSI B450 Pro Carbon (Believe they use the same VRM), and Gigabyte X470 Aorus Gaming 7. The Gaming 5 has the fake 4 phase VRM the 7 is the one to get.

    Lot of PC builders cheap out on the power supply and the board. Expect to pay around $200 for the board and at least $80 when good power supplies go on sale.

    Look out for the sales. I picked up the ASRock X470 Taichi for $145, which is a 12 phase VRM, even with 4.2 ghz overblock on my 2700x VRM temps run cool, probably doesn't even need heatsinks.

    4 ghz on all 8 cores isn't impressive to you? Remember stock is 3.7 ghz. And remember this is on EIGHT cores, 16 threads at 4ghz is not impressive to you? I have 0.0100 negative offset, and about 1.25 volts when at 100% on all 8 cares, and stays under 60 C on air, I'm impressed. Ryzen 2700x is an amazing chip considering I got it for $268. That's incredible.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
  4. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    What's not impressive -- but not a big deal -- is that with overclocking I only got 60 MHz improvement (about 1.5%).

    I *thought* that the Prime was supposed to be a good board. No? Maybe I should have stuck with ASRock
     
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