Vaio E series wireless N

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by paulie.vaio, Sep 30, 2010.

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  1. paulie.vaio

    paulie.vaio Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hey guys! I have a EB2S1E, on the official sony page it says i have b/g/n standard for my wi-fi card, but when i am trying to connect it to my router Linksys WRT120N it will only connect using the G standard which is 54 Mbps, it will not connect to the N standard which the router is transmiting.
    Can anyone tell me what am i doing wrong ? Thanks!
     
  2. PatchySan

    PatchySan Om Noms Kit Kat

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    Check your router to see if its transmitting wireless N mode, the default address to access the router is 192.168.1.1 and enter your login details (default username is "admin", password leave blank).

    Depending on certain models it maybe set on "Auto" or "Mixed" mode but you can try forcing it to use Wireless N mode to see if that works. Check this webpage as a guide to do this.
     
  3. arth1

    arth1 a҉r҉t҉h

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    Some cards only do 2.4 GHz and are really b/g/(n) and not b/g/n. These will have problems connecting to 5 GHz access points that don't fall back to 2.4 GHz, and genrally run at g speeds with the access points that do.

    For all intent and purposes, you can treat these b/g/(n) cards as b/g only, because they depend on either (a) fallback to 802.11 b/g compatibility being enabled in n access points (which drops speed to g speeds, even for other connected n users), or (b) the even more unlikely scenario of running 40 MHz aggregated channels in the 2.4 GHz band, which can only be done if all channels between 3 and 11 are clear, i.e. in a basement, without cell phones, microwaves or bluetooth equipment nearby.

    The problem is that the WiFi Alliance has allowed old equipment to be sold as 802.11n. What you need to look for is the "n" logo with "5 GHz" printed below it. If it only says "n", it might be a "g" card with MIMO that depends on the access point falling back to "g". Same goes for routers and access points.
    If in doubt, get one labeled a/b/g/n, because then you know it will support 5 GHz.

    This is much like the USB Alliance with "USB 2.0", which can be relabeled USB 1.1 ("USB 2.0 Full Speed") or even 1.0 ("USB 2.0 Low Speed").
    Look for the "Hi-Speed" in the logo of USB 2.0, and look for the "5 GHz" in the logo of 802.11n.
     
  4. H.A.L. 9000

    H.A.L. 9000 Occam's Chainsaw

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    ^That! The WiFi alliance took FOREVER to ratify the N standard, and for years there were cards being made advertising "Draft-N" and those were usually the 2.4GHz adapters without spacial multiplexing, so their top negotiated speeds are going to be a maximum of 150Mb/s. True N-WiFi is going to be a dual-band 3x3 card with max data rates of 300Mb/s.

    The WRT120N only supports 150Mb/s connections @ 2.4GHz with N. Here is a screensnip from my upstairs WRT110N, of the page where you verify that you're on Mixed. Go to your browser and type in 192.168.1.1 and the password will be admin with nothing in the username blank.

    [​IMG]
     
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