UX31 Completely DEAD! Help.

Discussion in 'Asus' started by SeBsZ, Jan 10, 2012.

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  1. aaronnoraa

    aaronnoraa Newbie

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    Same problem as everyone else. Out of warranty. This needs a class action lawsuit.
     
  2. macku

    macku Newbie

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    I had the same issue of the notebook not turning on at all. I openend it and did disconnect the battery and the CMOS battery. It didn't change anything. When opened i could occasionally turn it on.
    At least i found out, that if i put some pressure on the battery connector(internal connector to mainboard) when pushing the power on button the notebook fired up. So i put some layers of paper on it to get some pressure from the backplate when reassembled.

    Works like a charm :)
     
  3. RSD1982

    RSD1982 Newbie

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    Hi everyone. I've just signed up here to post a solution to this problem.

    I'm a self employed computer tech, repairing all kinds of machines. I had a customer who thought that their charging port was broken as the machine wouldn't charge up.

    Firstly, I tested the voltage across the charger. It was zero. I opened up the LED end and found a broken wire which I soldered back on. Testing the voltage again I found something I'd never seen before. The two bands in the charger are 2 different voltages (9.1v and 19.2v)

    I connected it to the laptop thinking the job was done. Opened the lid to find the LED was lit on power, WiFi and Caps. The laptop wouldn't turn on. I held in the power button. All 3 lights went off and then nothing. At all.

    My reasoning for this happening:
    In order to make this laptop thin and light, ASUS have kitted it out with more powerful Lithium Polymer (LiPo) batteries. These batteries are miles better than standard Nickel Metal Hydride batteries. They are lighter and more powerful. However, there is a reason they are not used in laptops and other home electronics. They are more complicated to maintain.

    A LiPo cell has a fully charged voltage of 4.2v and a nominal charge of 3.7v. They should NOT be allowed to discharge below 3.3v otherwise they can become unstable due to a chemical reaction that begins to occur in the cell. If they get below this voltage they need to be charged very carefully until they come back above the 3.3v threshold, then they can be charged normally again. When I opened up my customer's UX31 there were 4 identifiable cells in the battery. (14.8v when fully charged) Each cell was at 3.1v - below the threshold.

    In my opinion, this is the main cause of the problem. ASUS, I think, have recognised this problem and the computer is set up so that if the battery is below 3.3v per cell, it will not switch on, as doing so can cause serious damage to the battery - overheating and possibly causing fire. (If you want to see how bad a lipo fire is, search for it on YouTube!). If the computer goes to sleep, it continues to draw voltage from the battery. In this situation it could take the battery below 3.3v per cell, leading to the computer locking down. Plugging the charger in doesn't do anything because the battery is reporting an error to the computer, so the computer wont activate the charging circuit.

    This is a simplified version of how lipo battery chemistry works - If you want to know more detail about it then search online. I have worked with lipo batteries for years though, as they are used for radio controlled cars, so I have a very good knowledge of them. The battery chargers used in the RC world recognise the complicated and delicate chemistry of these cells and are equally complicated with numerous settings. (I think the dual voltage output from the ASUS charger is their attempt at a lipo charger)

    My Solution

    In order for the computer to power on, it has to be forced to forget the battery warning. I therefore wanted to remove EVERYTHING that could hold this information. However, the RAM and the BIOS are soldered onto the board, so removing them isn't an option. I took the bottom off the laptop (10 x Torx 5 screws); removed the CMOS battery connection, removed the main battery which has a screw in the middle, between the two halves, and one either side and then I connected the charger. There was still nothing.

    I then removed the SSD (there's a screw under the "warranty void" warning sticker) and plugged the charger back in. This time it powered on and lit up. WITHOUT shutting down, I reconnected the SSD and screwed it down. I then restarted the computer successfully. With the power ON and the computer ON I reconnected the CMOS battery and the main battery. The computer stayed on and the showed that it was charging the battery. The battery remained at 0% for over 30 minutes (remember, the computer is set to say that 3.3v per cell, the critical voltage, is 0% - this explains why it was at 0% for so long - it had to be above 3.3v to be reported as having any useable power). It is now at 47% which should be halfway between 3.3v (lowest safe voltage per cell for lipo) and 4.2v (fully charged voltage per cell) so around 3.7v per cell.

    IN ORDER TO STOP THIS HAPPENING AGAIN I HAVE EDITED ALL WINDOWS POWER PLANS. THE OPTION TO SLEEP HAS BEEN REMOVED IN ALL PLANS. POWER BUTTON = SHUT DOWN. CLOSING THE LID = SHUT DOWN. LEFT IDLE FOR 15 MINUTES = SHUT DOWN.

    I suggest you do the same as I am POSITIVE that leaving the laptop on sleep or hibernate is causing the battery to go below 3.3v per cell which is the cause of all the problems. I imagine the replaced "boards"are either new batteries being fitted with a voltage above 3.3v, or a motherboard with a better charging circuit. BIOS updates may help as they could stop the lockdown of the computer if the voltage drops too low, but I'm not sure if the computer is equipped with an intelligent enough charging system to safely bring the voltage back up. Either way, this is a problem ASUS need to address!

    Anyway, that's what I think is going on!
     
    JD D and nipsen like this.
  4. Sparky19692

    Sparky19692 Newbie

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    Hello everyone, I usually don't join forums or post,I just read read read. I like all of you have experienced the DOA of this ultra book. I have read this forum many times and looked high and low for a cure disassembled this unit more time than I can count trying to fix it. I was going to pull the battery and remove the screen (my mom has the same ultra book and she breaks things) in preparation for the scrap heap. I decided to try baking the motherboard one last time. yes I did this twice before. done all the battery drains replace the thermo compound (thinking because some times the fan would come on with the cap and f2 key lights the cpu was getting to hot) I am convinced there is/was a manufacturing issue with the solder. this time I baked it for 15 min at 405 F it has been running for a week with hundreds of reboots(because I don't trust this thing any more) it is running strong and am starting to remember why I bought this ultrabook and forget all the frustration although I still don't trust it 100% yet I am slowly getting over its be-trail to me. Hope this helps someone. you have nothing to lose if the warranted is up. Good Luck! I know how frustrating it is these are not cheap.
     
  5. RRoaRRin

    RRoaRRin Notebook Enthusiast

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    Did you bake the motherboard with the processor on?

    If no, how did you take it of? There is some silicone/glue holding it to the motherboard that I cant seem to get off. I tried baking it at 215 (since the max processor temp is ~220, and it did not soften the silicone at all. I cant get through it with a razor blade either.....
     
  6. Blue Blue

    Blue Blue Newbie

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    Same problem. Obviously a design fault that Asus are in denial about, personally I wouldn't buy another product from this company no matter how aesthetically appealing it is.

    The problem as I understand it is the keyboard. I have disconnected the battery, tried powering direct via the mains charger, tested the charger and battery etc etc. There is an on button under the keyboard power on, which disconnects. New keyboard is required, Asus charge top $$$$. I'd suggest ebay or whatever.

    Asus - poor on customer support
     
    Kent T likes this.
  7. Kevin@GenTechPC

    Kevin@GenTechPC Company Representative

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    If your unit is under warranty, they will cover any warranty issues including defects. If it's beyond the warranty coverage period then they cannot do anything for it.
    Things can fail because of wear and tear.

    On the other hand, eBay definitely has cheaper notebook parts. :)
     
  8. twestheimer

    twestheimer Newbie

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    Twice now my UX31 was completely dead, removed the bottom, disconnected the battery which by the way is fully charged. attached the power cable and it turned on. reassembled it and connected the battery and it is fine .... for now. I have the 213 BIOS and read somewhere to update the bios which would be to 214 but appears to be just for Win 8 compatibility
     
    nipsen likes this.
  9. EdenCC

    EdenCC Newbie

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    @RSD1982: Thank you so much for your solution to the "UX31E Completely Dead"-problem!!!!

    I´m from Germany and a proud owner of an Asus Zenbook UX31E-RY008V. I had the same problem as described in this thread. My Zenbook showed the problem 4 weeks ago for the first time (September 25, 2015): it was at about 50% charge and I shut it down to load it. After loading (not fully), it wouldn´t turn on, it just showed the three lamps (power, F2, caps lock), nothing else. No power-on self test, no operating system.

    That happened in the early afternoon, but in the evening my husband managed to start the notebook again. But it was strange, he needed to push the power button for quite a long time before the system started. Then the notebook worked fine for about two weeks ( I actually didn´t really use it, most of the time it was switched off). After two weeks (October 1, 2015) it showed the same problem again: again at about 50% charge and after working on it in battery operation, I shut it down to load it. After loading (not fully), it wouldn´t start. Same problem again, but this time we couldn´t manage to start my Zenbook, it remained dead. Didn´t matter how often I tried to turn it on, only the three lamps went on and stayed on. Nothing else.

    So I decided to give my notebook to a technician. He checked a lot and told me it must be the mainboard. But he wasn´t equipped enough to help me on. So I decided to send it in to Asus for repair. They checked my notebook again, made a C-mos reset and told me that my mainboard was broken and had to be changed. But that was really expensive: 522,00 Euro (around 580 Dollar) so I decided not to let it be done.

    Today I received my notebook back from Asus, in an unrepaired condition! Even the accompanying letter said: "Notebook can´t boot, was carefully tested before sent back to owner". I was happy to have it back, so I unpacked it, let it acclimatise for some time because it was quite cold when it arrived by post this morning. Without any hope, I sat down on my couch and pushed the power button, knowing that nothing would happen except for the 3 lamps lighting.

    BUT:
    my Zenbook started without any problems!!! I couldn´t believe it. We immediately plugged in the power cable and tested the system: everything okay! We installed Windows-updates and started it all over again, it worked every time (while plugged in!).

    This evening I used my notebook in battery operation for about one hour. At a charge of about 50% I shut it down, and 15 minutes later I wanted to turn it on again (because I´m so happy that it is back working!!) but the same problem again: it wouldn´t turn on. I plugged it in immediately and left it for about 5 minutes then I tried to start it (still plugged in) and it worked: it turned on fine and everything worked perfectly again.
    When plugged out, it doesn´t turn on when it it at a charge of about 50% or less, so I think that your solution to the problem is right: some of my battery cells seem to be broken, and when it is only at a charge of about 50%, the Lipo cells seem to fall beneath 3.3v and so the notebook doesn´t turn on. My notebook is 4 years old so I think the battery isn´t in the best condition anymore. I will have my battery changed soon since I´m convinced that the battery and the complicated Lipo cells are the problem.

    Well, I just post this because I already found your text here in Notebookreview three days ago, when my Zenbook was still at Asus´. I wanted to find out about other users who have the same problem. I read your post with great interest and I found so many similarities that I even printed out your explanation and solution because I was somehow sure that my mainboard isn´t the problem but something else.

    Thank you for explaining the problem in such clear words! You have helped me a lot! :)
     
  10. razvanz

    razvanz Newbie

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    @EdenCC Will you let us know what happened after you changed the battery? Thanks!
     
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