USB Graphic Card

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by This is the name, Jan 14, 2018 at 8:07 AM.

  1. This is the name

    This is the name Notebook Geek

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    Hi
    I have an Shuttle Pc who have an single PCI Slot who is hard to find an Graphiccard for and the are expensive.
    The internal Intel CPU Graphic is powerful enogth so I need just an good for the other stuff.

    How about the DisplayLink DL-5500 Chipset?
    http://www.delock.de/produkte/1102_Monitor-Adapter/62581/merkmale.html

    The have an Display Port Connection who I relay need not the HDMI rubbish!
    Does anyone here have experience with that chipset?
    Thanks!
     
  2. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    What are you trying to do?

    That kind of external display adapter is usually used to add additional displays to a computer (for multi-montior or docking station setups).

    They are terrible for performance. Easily worse than whatever integrated graphics you have now... Even for just simple desktop productivity use.
     
  3. This is the name

    This is the name Notebook Geek

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    Office, Browsing,... for TV and Games I will use the Internal Graphic who work yet very good.
    The external look good because the have an 1 GB (DDR3 RAM) and is rated for 4K (who I dont have at the moment) so the should have more power.
     
  4. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    It's not the power. It's not the rating. It's the fact that you're going over USB 2.0.

    ANY external graphics adapter will choke at USB 2.0. You're sending data to the external graphics card over a very low bandwidth connection. For 1080p, expect 1-3 seconds of lag, and very low framerates. Any video you play will stutter (due to incredibly low framerates), and the audio will be out-of-sync.

    And that's just basic 1080p. 4K is four times the pixels as 1080p, so expect the performance to be even worse (if it runs at all). Buying an external graphics card will be an absolute waste of money for you.

    Edit: By the way, every modern external graphics card you find will assume you are running USB 3.0. They will list backwards compatibility with USB 2.0. But just because something will physically plug in and function, does not mean that it's performance will be satisfactory.
     
  5. This is the name

    This is the name Notebook Geek

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    ?!....
    The Use USB 3.0!

     
  6. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    Yes, that external graphics card uses USB 3.0.

    But I doubt your computer has USB 3.0. An old computer with only a PCI slot (not PCI-E) for expansion is probably too old to have USB 3.0. I am basing this assumption on the information in your previous posts.

    If your computer does indeed have USB 3.0, then go ahead and get the external graphics card. But again, if your computer is more than 5+ years old, there's a good chance that a custom non-standard motherboard design (like the ones used in Shuttle SFF PCs) won't have USB 3.0.
     
  7. This is the name

    This is the name Notebook Geek

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    I mean PCI-E... and the have USB 3.0.
    The Shuttle is Brand New! Fres out of the Box with an nice Intel i5 and 8GB Ram.
     
  8. Starlight5

    Starlight5 So what if I'm crazy? The best people are.

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    @This is the name the iGPU included in the CPU will dance in circles around any USB graphics card. You can drive multiple PCIe devices from a single slot if you insitst, with something like this; performance hit going from x16 to x4 won't be high, this is a viable solution especially if you manage to cram it all inside. Or you can just use a dirty cheap PCIe extender and larger card.

    Or maybe I misunderstood, and your complaint is lack of displayport output on the motherboard? If you device is new indeed, it should have USB-C connector, which also carries displayport signal, so just a USB-C to displayport adapter and call it a day.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2018 at 4:04 AM
  9. This is the name

    This is the name Notebook Geek

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    There is no space for an 2 Slot Card and now Power connector inside the Mini Pc.
    Yes there is just one HDMI and one VGA who sucks.
    Nope there is no USB C and I never seen any on an Pc?!
     
  10. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    Ok. PCI-E changes things... that is very different than PCI.

    If you have a single PCI-E slot, and want extra display connectors to drive things like 4K video, and you absolutely do not do gaming, then get a low-end dedicated graphics card, like the nVidia Geforce 1030 for about $85 USD on Amazon.com. It gives you DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.0b, both of which can drive 4K @ 60Hz, and gives you things like H.264 and H.265 hardware acceleration for smoother video playback.

    [​IMG]





    On another note, there is a very big difference between USB-C and USB 3.0.
    [​IMG]


    USB Type C is a standard for the physical shape of the plug.
    USB 3.0 is a data-transfer standard that defines how fast data transfers.

    The confusion is usually because USB Type C and USB 3.1 standards both came out at about the same time; so people assume they mean the same thing. They do not.

    An external graphics card / docking station that operates over USB 3.0 usually plugs in via USB 3.0 Type A (3rd picture from the left, with the blue connector). That gives you the fast data transfer speeds over your "normal" rectangular-shaped USB Type-A plugs. You do not need a plug with the physical shape of USB Type C in order to use a modern external graphics card / docking station.
     
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