USB-C Power Delivery Chargers

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by muzicman82, Aug 22, 2017.

  1. muzicman82

    muzicman82 Notebook Consultant

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    Hi all,

    I just have some clarification questions regarding the chaos that is currently USB-C. Will ANY USB-C with PD support charge any other USB-C phone, tablet, or laptop if those devices support PD? Do we need to ensure that the charger used supports specific charging voltages, or will any of them work at different charge rates?

    I bought a 2017 HP Spectre x360 13" a few months ago. (SIDE NOTE: If you're looking, this is an amazing convertible Ultrabook... 4k screen w/ Pen, Core i7, 512GB NVMe SSD, 16GB RAM, Thunderbolt3). It charges via a 45W USB-C charger. I generally have laptop chargers everywhere, so I ordered a bulk of Dell LA45NM150 chargers from eBay. They say 5V/20V on the sticker. Should these also charge my Galaxy S8, which charges at 5V and 9V? Do chargers need to say Power Delivery or PD to meet PD spec, or does that come along with having multiple voltages.

    Likewise, I am guessing my laptop NEEDS 20V to charge? So if I took say, a phone charger and plugged it into the laptop, would it just not charge since it can't switch to 20V?

    I am also speculating that if a USB-C charger only says 20V on the sticker, will it fry a Galaxy S8? Or is there protection for this sort of thing?

    Also, is there any advantage to using a USB-C to USB-C charging cable and brick vs a USB-C to USB-A cable with a brick when it comes to phones? I usually only buy Anker brand charging stuff and the USB-C cables have 56kohm resistors.

    I am no newbie to power, chargers, electronics, tech.. but there's a lot of gray area right now on this stuff it seems.
     
  2. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    The design of USB-C Power Delivery involves chips in both the power supply and the device communicating to determine the voltage to be supplied. I have a Plugable meter which shows that power isn't sent until there is agreement on the voltage. I recently bought this PSU for which the info clearly states "DC 5/9V/15V/20V 3A Output" (it also conveniently includes a USB-A 5V 2A socket). The label on the Dell LA45NM150 PSU states 5V/20V 2/2.5A but there's no mention of 9V although, if this info applies, it should include 9V support. Or maybe that requirement only applies if the product were being released now.

    John
     
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  3. muzicman82

    muzicman82 Notebook Consultant

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    Yeah I think I'll need to get that Plugable meter. I have an older PLX Legion Meter, but it is for older USB devices.
     
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