(Urgent Assistance) EVOC P750DM2-G High PCH Temperatures

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by Spootnuke, May 2, 2017.

  1. Spootnuke

    Spootnuke Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hello all,

    System specs (Purchased Feb, 2017):
    BIOS: EVOC 1.06.09EVOC v2, 04/12/2017
    CPU: 7700K
    RAM: Kingston 2400 MHz (2x8GB)
    GPU: 1070 MXM
    SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 1TB
    WiFi/BT: Intel 8265

    Approximately 2 weeks ago, I received the Windows 10 Creators Update (10.0.15063 Build 15063) and attempted to use disk cleanup to delete the old Windows installation folders that were created after the fact because I felt comfortable with the stability.

    Upon deletion, I was noticing some random freezing/lagging, so I decided to load my BIOS defaults because I felt that maybe my down-clocked 7700K might have something to do with it. After resetting the BIOS, things still felt wonky, so I decided to wipe the machine and re-install Windows. After doing so, things smoothed out with all my applications re-installed, but I was still experiencing issues with games.

    Upon loading a game or OCCT GPU benchmark, the system will function normally until it reaches ~70ish°C. After that, it powers off, as if it were a thermal protection scenario. To take better precautions, I went ahead and re-pasted the GPU/CPU and replaced the thermal pads. Thermals were down from previous testing, but I'm still experiencing power downs after thermals reach ~70ish°C.

    CPU/RAM Benchmarks/stress tests can run without issue. I found this to be an odd aspect to the issue, and wanted to further inspect what might be causing the power-downs. I noticed in event viewer that the Intel 8265 was crashing repeatedly on boot after these power-downs, so I ordered a replacement to troubleshoot. After testing the system with all the different RAM configuration and WiFi card configurations, I found no correlation, and that the power-downs would still continue to happen regardless. On a side note, I couldn't complete the built-in Windows Memory Diagnostic, as it would power-down mid test regardless of percentage.

    I also noticed that when I run the GPU load tests, that if I limit the load, the test would run fine without issue. After updating drivers and further testing with HID Evolution technical support, we noticed the issue still existed, and will be picking back up on troubleshooting today. This morning, I downloaded HWInfo64 to further inspect temperatures and logging, and found an interesting issue.

    My PCH (Platform Controller Hub) temperatures at IDLE ARE +100°C..... During a stress test of the CPU, the temperatures reach somewhere near 110°C. I swear I read somewhere that the maximum thermal limit of the Z170 Clevo motherboards was 111°C. When I run the GPU load test, the PCH thermals go above 111°C and I experience a power-down. I have no idea which IC package mounted on the motherboard, but I REALLY want to mitigate this issue with a heat-sink/thermal pad.

    So, does anyone know of the position of the PCH?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

    Reputations:
    1,190
    Messages:
    6,980
    Likes Received:
    826
    Trophy Points:
    281
    If I recall correctly, the PCH on this system is supposed to have a rather thick thermal pad on it, and should be located on the top side of the board (the top case has to come off to expose the chip). You might want to check with HID about the location of it just to be sure, and also to check on whether breaking the system down to that extent will affect your warranty or not.
     
    Spootnuke likes this.
  3. Spootnuke

    Spootnuke Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    16
  4. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

    Reputations:
    19,184
    Messages:
    29,779
    Likes Received:
    36,618
    Trophy Points:
    931
    The picture is a bit grainy, but as best I can tell that is the PCH chip to the right of the RAM. It needs to be cooled. The P870 has a metal plate there. A thermal pad with nothing for the thermal pad to transfer the heat to is not going to be very useful. Maybe others can compare their P750DM2-G PCH temps. If the high temps on this machine is an anomaly, then perhaps a motherboard swap is in order.
     
    jclausius, Phoenix and Spootnuke like this.
  5. Spootnuke

    Spootnuke Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Thanks for the information Mr. Fox. I'll ensure there is a thermal pad in place that mates the surface of the PCH to the metal cover plate for dissipation.
     
  6. Phoenix

    Phoenix Super Tweaker

    Reputations:
    8,188
    Messages:
    14,699
    Likes Received:
    18,647
    Trophy Points:
    931
    also ensure that you set whatever undervolt you had before resetting that BIOS to defaults
     
    Spootnuke likes this.
  7. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

    Reputations:
    1,190
    Messages:
    6,980
    Likes Received:
    826
    Trophy Points:
    281
    That's the one, although it looks like there's a piece of thermal tape(?) over it in that picture. Usually it's bare with a thick, purple thermal pad placed over it. Also, there's no additional metal plate on this model, the pad mates it to the top case assembly.
     
    Spootnuke likes this.
  8. Spootnuke

    Spootnuke Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    16
    After further inspection of the chip, I noticed that there was an air gap between the thermal interface and the case. I went ahead and added a 2.0 mm thermal pad and it appears to be stable under load. The temperatures are down from +111°C (and crashing) to ~99°C (OCCT Power Supply Test GPU & CPU with unlimited FPS). Shame the fans simply blow air across the heat-sink's radiators, as the PCH could use some airflow.

    Currently typing on the machine, and with high performance mode engaged in the Clevo control center, I've got 90°C on the PCH according to HWInfo64 with no load consistently. Better than 105°C on power-saving mode.

    (-0.070 Under-volt[Adaptive]/Down-clocked to 40x/38x/37x/37x)

    I wonder if a static under-volt would help.
    Battery life is also excellent as well.

    Thanks for the help!
     
    Prostar Computer likes this.
  9. Phoenix

    Phoenix Super Tweaker

    Reputations:
    8,188
    Messages:
    14,699
    Likes Received:
    18,647
    Trophy Points:
    931
    105C or F???? 105C means your CPU is fried buddy :rolleyes:
     
  10. Spootnuke

    Spootnuke Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    16
    105°C on the PCH on the opposite side of the PCB.

    My GPU CPU temps are below 75°C at load. It's the PCH that was running hot.
    Right now, my temps at idle with automatic fans (Windows power plan drives it up to 100% clock speed all the time) are less than 40°C.

    Edit:
    On a side note, that would be amazing to still be operating at load with +100C temperatures...
     

Share This Page