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Two GTX 1080 ti with different temperatures?

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by verysame, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi there,

    I have my first setup with two monitors and two video cards, in this case, they are two GTX 1080 ti both with 11GB.
    I have two questions:
    1) The two monitors are both connected to one video card. Is that the right setup? Or should I have each monitor connected to each individual video card?
    2) One of the two cards always runs at higher temperatures. The average is 10-15% more.

    The curious thing is that after I added card #2, keeping the monitors are they were originally on card #1 didn't work: after the boot, the screens were completely black. I plugged the monitors into card #2 and after the log in Windows 10 showed a message about drivers failed to load properly. Now I'm keeping the monitors connected to the card #2.

    Thanks for any insights.
     
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  2. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Any idea?
     
  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    Hello. You would normally connect both monitors to the master GPU, but if that is working OK then I would not worry about it. Are the GPUs connected by a high-bandwidth SLI bridge? If not, the GPU that is being used the most would normally get warmer. You will always see a little bit of difference between GPUs in a working SLI arrangement, so unless one is actually overheating it may not be a huge concern. The air flow inside of the case can have an effect on this. If the bottom GPU close to the PSU does not have as much ventilation, it could make it run a bit warmer. What are the actual GPU core temperatures at idle and when you run a game or GPU benchmark.

    If you are running the same drivers now with SLI and did not reinstall them, try reinstalling the drivers, then open NVIDIA control panel and confirm SLI is enabled. It should be automatically on a desktop, but if it is not, enable SLI and apply.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  4. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you for your reply, Mr. Fox.
    The GPUs are not connected via SLI. The box is an Alienware Area 51 R3.

    When I'm not working, the temperature is around 32-34 for the 2nd GPU with the monitors connected to it, and around 27 for the 1st GPU.
    The 2nd GPU is an Asus which I purchased separately. The 1st GPU is what comes with the Alienware.

    I'm using the machine for 3d renders with GPU renderer engines.
    When I stress the render the temperature goes up to 75-78 for the 2nd GPU (I don't think it reached 80 yet) and around 65 for the first.

    From what you're saying I think it should all fine then.
     
  5. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    If the bottom GPU has a back plate, maybe you can take it off to better the cooling?
     
  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    You need to get a high bandwidth SLI bridge. Otherwise, the second GPU is not serving any purpose.

    Yes, those idle and load temps are perfectly fine and I would not lose any sleep over them. The difference between them could be as simple as the fact that they are different brands and may be running at different clock speeds. If you put the high bandwidth SLI bridge in place their temps could be closer to the same and if they are not already, the clock speeds should be in sync. I think the cramped quarters and odd case shape of your case may also have some influence on the difference.

    I would not recommend removing the back plate. It should help cooling, not hurt it. They are actually designed to serve as a heat sink and it also adds structural integrity to the GPU, supporting the weight of the heat sink and fan(s). If you remove the back plate, the PCB will be more subject to stress and fatigue.
     
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  7. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah I mentioned this because my MSI 1080 ti Armour OC doesn't have one but, it does have the support bracket.
     
  8. Cass-Olé

    Cass-Olé Notebook Consultant

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    The Alien Forum is going under a major re-vamp & has been down since last Friday, which is where I would normally go to look for archived posts regarding which size / spacing of High Bandwidth SLI Bridge you need to get, in the meantime you would measure the space between the cards in millimeters (1inch = 25.4mm / 2.54cm); typical sources for bridges are Dell, NVidia, EVGA

    I think you need a 60mm spacing, a fact I would find on the community forum, which I can't do now, it's down

    Alien Support can be reached via phone, email, Facebook (private message) & Twitter for spare parts & referral for needed parts ... the angular factory card connecting bridge is seen below, it is a basic NVidia type ... (question for Aliens is 'can I buy the factory HB SLI bridge for my R3', but of course they charge double the retail, therefore NVidia / EVGA are a better source for one once you have the spacing identified) (qwestion #2 for Alien flunky: what size bridge do I need, 40mm or 60mm spacing?')
    [​IMG]
    Above, standard NVidia bridge seen in review / pre-production / media sample
    [​IMG]
    Above may be a revised bridge for R3 / R4 ... note the card spacing --> appears to be factory set-up so each card gets x16 rating (note this is the Intel board, TRippers below)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    NVidia EVGA bridges are ~$40 for your model, Aliens charge ~$50-$80
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
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  9. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for all the insights.

    However, for 3d renders the cards don't need to be in SLI mode (actually it's better not using it at all).
    I guess it's something gamers benefit more?

    Best
     
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