Toughbooks, Hurricanes, Gobi, and other "Prepper" questions...

Discussion in 'Panasonic' started by thewanderlustking, May 6, 2018.

  1. r0tati0n

    r0tati0n Notebook Enthusiast

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    Wow.

    That is some story...


    Regarding the ham radios, they can operate at high (8 watts) and low power. I could cover kilometers with mine.
    (It is not allowed because of no license but a short test burst is hard to triangulate)
     
  2. theoak2

    theoak2 Notebook Evangelist

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    In addition to already mentioned MREs, lanterns, hunting rifle, and small generator or power bank, also recommended:

    A weather band radio with a hand crank generator built in. It also has a solar charger, flashlight, and USB port to recharge cell phones.
    A paper map, and orienteering compass (battery will never die)
    A Ronco portable fishing pole, and filet knife, so I can catch dinner (if water is deemed to be safe/uncontaminated).
    Drinking water filter straw if water is contaminated.

    EDIT: and don't forget extra prescription medications, and USB drive with copies of all important papers (insurance policies, birth certificates, deeds, vehicle titles, etc.)
     
  3. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

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    No sir... I jumped over to look on amazon and that one stuck out. When you started this thread it got me to thinking also that there are several things I need to get and to restock. I had a great Grundig SW radio with the hand crank. I let it sit for a few years in a box without being used and the internal battery exploded and it was beyond repair. So I'd like to get a new one.

    That is a story of extremes.... WOW! Prepping for hurricanes is part of life down there. I am continually surprised year after year regarding the stories of those that live there that aren't prepared. Heck... I prep for hurricanes and I live 100 miles off the coast of VA where we rarely get a direct hit and only a few glancing blows every decade! But I would not get lulled into complacency because you, "always have cell service and TV."

    Every person on Earth should have 3 things... Food, water and a means to defend yourself, your family and what you have. If something like Katrina hits, an earthquake, asteroid or coronal mass ejection... and there is civil unrest, I don't care where you live on the planet... People are going to want what you have and they will be desperate enough to take it from you. This is an extreme scenario... But then you have already been through one I would not have predicted!
     
  4. thewanderlustking

    thewanderlustking Notebook Evangelist

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    Heh, and those are just the stories I can safely tell without incriminating myself!... I have lived in some rough areas. The one place I lived that was broken into? In the timespan of 2 years, I had at least 3-4 other attempts, that I KNOW about. I had a wolf, he was a very effective, deterrent.

    Again, a really good guideline to go by for these things is versatility. Any item whose cost is not insignificant, say less than $20, needs to have multiple uses. Or it needs to be something that will get used year around. I only made one big exception to that, our generator. And it is a small one.

    I love the idea of the 1000 gallon in ground tank and LPG generator. But I live in the city(ish). Any scenario needing that much back up power is going to have me heading elsewhere... In some ways, I wish I did live somewhere in the mountains or wilds. Then these things would just be a part of day to day life.

    Going through hurricane Irma added a very interesting needed feature to any radio put into use. It HAS to have a digital display. Changing between stations on an old style needle just doesn't work well on such a small radio. It was a big frustration of the $10 radio we had on hand.

    Speaking of radios and Toughbooks, has anyone tried out any of the "software" usb radios? Considering the price on them is frequently in the $20-50 range, that looks like a super cheap way to get into a VERY good radio setup with full features. And add in more super cool mods and functionality to our already awesome Toughbooks.

    I mean really turning our beloved CF-19 into a world band radio ALSO?! How wicked cool is that?! I am pretty sure I can fit the radio bits inside the computer. And we all know that most of this are simply excuses to further mod our little workhorses...
     
  5. longknives

    longknives Notebook Enthusiast

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    You get it! some don't or won't, they become statistics real quick in the real world. Katrina opened my eye's to the way the authorities acted and changed my outlook on their whole "to serve and protect" thing. The Cajun navy knew how to act and get thing's done. "Be Prepared" was a great motto back in the day and is still relevent today.
     
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  6. thewanderlustking

    thewanderlustking Notebook Evangelist

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    There are a lot of preppers out there who just weird me out... Prepping for a single extreme event that has never happened before and is unlikely to ever happen, like an EMP, a zombie apocalypse, a vampire invasion, is wasteful of resources. Unless your David Koresh, or live in the ghetto, bulletproofing your house is kinda silly.

    I think the danger point comes where you spend your whole income and life prepping, and don't live in the current world.

    You live in an area likely to be targeted first in a nuclear strike. So you build a bunker 30' under ground that costs your whole life savings. Are you spending every night down there? If so, then that strike will hit when you're taking out the trash, or washing dishes in your house, or pulling weeds in your garden, or walking the dog... Unless you're a high-level government official, you are not going to know that the strike is coming. Once you see the flash, it is too late.

    Now if you live in Kansas, that bunker makes sense. If a tornado is on the way, you have time, even if only minutes. Although why they always have to run outside to get into the storm celler...

    If you live in the Hurricane belt, the bunker makes much less sense as you are going to have days of advance warning. Sure, that track can and will change last minute, but you're still going to have a good idea and should be listening or keeping tabs on it.

    If you live in a place like New Orleans, or Detroit, prepping for civil unrest is smart. If you live in Texas, maybe prep for your neighbors civil unrest! Heh...

    Reality is, if you drive an old car, put a bag of tools and some parts in it.

    On the other hand, most homes do not even have a real first aid kit. I keep one out in my workshop and one in the main bathroom. Plus ones in both cars. Good ones too, not $5 junk kits.

    We will lose power every hurricane season, even if just from a rainstorm, we will loose power. My router and infotainment center is on a battery backup so I don't lose internet for 24-48hrs after the power goes back on. I have a backup generator for extended blackouts.

    I do have some Beofang radios (but apparently, don't know how to use them properly).

    I have a bug out bag packed. I also keep the beach bags packed. Seriously, if you live in Florida and can't find the "OMG we have to go to the beach NOW!" supplies, it becomes an emergency.

    If somebody breaks in, I am ready to defend my dog. He will make ineffective noise, and hide behind me... If Mom is upset, he also hides behind me. Or if it is morning...

    I think it really goes back to the whole dual purpose concept. If you can make your prep supplies serve duty day to day, then they are not only tested and familiar, but much more useful if an emergency does happen. Must of my crisis survival supplies, double as awesome camping supplies.

    90% of prepping is simply having the knowledge of what to do in a situation or crisis. Many of the supplies is just a placebo effect. Every year the missus buys more batteries. Every year I manage to use up the AA and AAA ones within a few months, but never the others. But it makes her feel better. The training and knowledge of what to do in any given situation will serve you much better!

    If you have never fired a gun under duress, then having one with the pretense it is to defend your home, becomes questionable. On the other hand, a katana you can't use, is even more pointless.

    If you survive the hurricane or tornado in your fallout shelter but have to go borrow a chainsaw from your neighbor to get out once it is over... Speaking of neighbours, mine came over the other day. He is a little older than me maybe 48-50. He needed to borrow a ladder. Then he tried to borrow me, because he didn't know how to use a ladder. Say what?!

    But back to the whole "why" you would even need a Toughbook? Knowledge is power. Knowledge, or access to it, is the most critical thing needed in any crisis. And on that note, I need to get my radios reprogrammed and figure out how to use them properly.
     
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  7. r0tati0n

    r0tati0n Notebook Enthusiast

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    Partly. It is the cross connections that matter. You know how to electronics? You know how to HAM radio? radio not working? You build one out of spare electronics - only that is true power.
     
  8. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

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    Reading this again reminds me that I need to buy new cases of MRE's...
     
  9. SHEEPMAN!

    SHEEPMAN! Freelance

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    I lived on MRE's (C-rats) for 9 months one time. Lost 20 pounds.
    The Army had MREs. Marine C-rats were Korean Veterans (or so we claimed)

    We liberated a gallon can of steak from the officer's mess one time. Now that would be worth storing.

    Two things:
    A couple years ago someone liberated some copper from a communications facility with an axe. While they were hacking and packing they cut the primary fiber optic cable that ran the 911 system.

    Last year further north a wildfire took out the same fiber optic cable. Several miles of it. This same fire fried my wireless service (no big deal)....took out the fiber optic AND the powerline that feeds the antennas. Took a week to get service restored. Mountaintop repeaters have generators but a limited fuel supply....if they start. Cell towers are on mountaintops around where I live....ummm one of the repeater facilities was scorched by the fire I mentioned.

    Morals
    1. Stuff happens fast.
    2. Have a reliable backup for necessaries.

    http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.ne.../x_large/public/201711/LaughlinPanorama_0.jpg
     
  10. kode-niner

    kode-niner Notebook Consultant

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    Same thing happened up here with the cables leading to one of my data centers. Furthermore, the backup cable wasn't supposed to be routed next to the main and they were both severed by the thieves. The telco who owned the cables was sloppy and got an earful from several angry service providers that promised them geographically separate fiber optic lines.
     
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