Tougbook Memory - speeds and compatibility

Discussion in 'Panasonic' started by toughasnails, Feb 2, 2014.

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  1. toughasnails

    toughasnails Toughbook Moderator Moderator

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    Memory is designed to be backward-compatible, so generally speaking, you can safely add faster memory to a computer that was designed to run slower memory. However, your system will operate at the speed of the slowest memory module.


    One thing to keep in mind is that the memory does need to be the same type - for example, SDRAM cannot be mixed with DDR, and DDR cannot be mixed with DDR2 and DDR2 cannot work in a DDR3 system.


    DDR2 PC2-4200, DDR2 PC2-5300, DDR2 PC2-6400, and DDR2 PC2-8000

    In DDR2 modules, the numbers that come after the "PC2" refer to the total bandwidth of the module. For this type of memory, a higher number represents faster memory, or more bandwidth. Occasionally DDR2 is referred to as a "Friendly name" like "DDR2-533" or "DDR2-667". When written this way, the numbers after "DDR2" refer to the data transfer rate per second (/s) of the components. DDR2 is not backward-compatible with DDR

    DDR2 PC2-5300 (commonly referred to as DDR2-667) memory is DDR2 designed for use in systems with a 333MHz front-side bus (providing a 667MT/s data transfer rate). The "5300" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 5300MB/s, or 5.3GB/s. PC2-5300 is backward-compatible for PC2-4200.


    DDR2 PC2-6400 (commonly referred to as DDR2-800) memory is DDR2 designed for use in systems with a 400MHz front-side bus (providing an 800MT/s data transfer rate). The "6400" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 6400MB/s, or 6.4GB/s. PC2-6400 is backward-compatible for PC2-4200 and PC2-5300.


    DDR2 PC2-8000 (commonly referred to as DDR2-1000) memory is DDR2 providing a 1,000MT/s data transfer rate). The "8000" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 8000MB/s, or 8GB/s. PC2-8000 is backward-compatible for PC2-4200, PC2-5300, and PC2-6400.

    DDR PC1600, PC2100, PC2700, and PC3200



    PC1600 memory — is DDR designed for use in systems with a 100MHz front-side bus, (providing a 200 mega transfers per second [MT/s] data transfer rate). The "1600" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 1600MB/s, or 1.6GB/s. PC1600 has been replaced by PC2700, which is backward-compatible.


    PC2100 memory — is DDR designed for use in systems with a 133MHz front-side bus (providing a 266 MT/s data transfer rate). The "2100" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 2100MB/s, or 2.1GB/s. PC2100 is used primarily in AMD® Athlon® systems, Pentium® III systems, and Pentium IV systems. PC2100 has been replaced by PC2700, which is backward-compatible.


    PC2700 memory — is DDR designed for use in systems with a 166MHz front-side bus (providing a 333 MT/s data transfer rate). The "2700" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 2700MB/s, or 2.7GB/s. PC2700 is backward-compatible for PC1600 and PC2100.


    PC3200 memory is DDR designed for use in systems with a 200MHz front-side bus (providing a 400 MT/s data transfer rate). The "3200" refers to the module's bandwidth (the maximum amount of data it can transfer each second), which is 3200MB/s, or 3.2GB/s. PC3200 is backward-compatible for PC1600, PC2100, and PC2700.

    SDRAM PC100, 125MHz, and PC133


    PC100 memory — is SDRAM designed for use in systems with a 100MHz front-side bus. It is used in many Pentium II, Pentium III, AMD K6-III, AMD Athlon, AMD Duron, and Power Mac G4 systems. PC100 has been replaced by PC133, which is backward-compatible.


    125MHz memory is SDRAM designed for use in systems with a 125MHz front-side bus. 125MHz has been replaced by PC133, which is backward-compatible.

    PC133 memory is SDRAM designed for use in systems with a 133MHz front-side bus. It is used in many Pentium III B, AMD Athlon, and Power Mac G4 systems. PC133 is backward-compatible for PC100 and 125MHz.

    For more info on memory please go here Memory upgrades from Crucial.com - Memory speeds and compatibility
     
  2. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

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    Interesting reading... I think I'll buy a few sticks of 6400 for a few of the CF-30s I have and try it out.
     
  3. sterbenlicht

    sterbenlicht Notebook Enthusiast

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    I have a CF-19CHBAXBM with 512MB that I'd like to boost up to at least 2GB. I've been reading around, and even in this, I'm not sure about something. I don't know what type (DDR, DDR2, etc) my 19 has, or if that even matters if I replaced whatever is in it currently. Can someone point me in the direction of a 2GB stick that will plop straight into that thing with no compatibility problems?

    I also encountered something else that makes me feel like it might be out of my comfort zone:

    "The CF-19C has a Core Duo, as previously explained a 32-bit chip. The chip does however have PAE (Physical Address Extensions), which should theoretically allow it to access up to 64GB RAM, paired with a PAE-enabled operating system. As it turns out, if you put 4GB RAM in a CF-19C, you will see 3.2GB.

    Often, the BIOS of a machine will map devices into the last 800MB or so of the 4GB 32-bit address space. On a machine with 4GB RAM, this will create a hole in memory of several hundred megs of unusable memory. Many BIOSes will have an option to map the physical memory around this hole and allow you to access it above the 4GB boundary, thanks to PAE. Unfortunately the BIOS on the CF-19C has no such option."


    Does this BIOS upgrade mean anything to me? What is being said there is unclear to me, and I'm not sure if it's something that has to be done with RAM upgrade or if that's related to something else. If I have to deal with upgrading the BIOS, I'll just do without the RAM. I'm sorry I'm not more knowledgeable about this stuff. You guys are all so far out of my range, I feel like a kid asking dumb questions.
     
  4. toughasnails

    toughasnails Toughbook Moderator Moderator

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  5. sterbenlicht

    sterbenlicht Notebook Enthusiast

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    Okay, most of those results look appealing. When I search, I include things like "toughbook" and I see all kinds of weird shapes and sizes and item descriptions for different brands of laptops which scared me into thinking there are specific models and different products that will work and others that won't work.

    Will this work?
    2GB Laptop DDR2 RAM 800MHz Genuine Kingston PC2 6400 200pin SODIMM Laptop RAM | eBay

    If so, is it okay to get two of them and plug in for the 3.2GB? And assuming I do that, is plugging them in and closing it up all there is to it, or is there something else involved afterward such as BIOS changes?
     
  6. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

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    Do you guys know that you can go to Crucial.com and find the exact type of RAM for your PCs? All listed by make and model.
     
  7. sterbenlicht

    sterbenlicht Notebook Enthusiast

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    No, but that is a very helpful resource, thank you. Much of this stuff is for people with some knowledge on the subject as it is full of acronyms and technical information. For me, it's a foreign language. I see things like DDR2 as a familiar term, but SODIMM, PC2, ECC and other such things that are commonly in the descriptions are greek as are most things that attempt to explain them. When I search ebay for RAM for my Toughbook, I find myself in a forest of products I know nothing about. I know I'm capable of physically installing the RAM under the bottom case with no difficulty as long as I have some sticks I'm positive will work perfectly, but if there is any higher knowledge required to make it work AFTER installing those sticks, I had better stay away from it.
     
  8. mklym

    mklym Notebook Evangelist

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    No higher knowledge needed man. Put in the ram, button it up, install battery and/or AC supply and hit the power button. The first boot will be slow and you might get a message the the memory has change. Continue the boot and.....that's it! :)
     
  9. sterbenlicht

    sterbenlicht Notebook Enthusiast

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    That makes me much more confident, I appreciate it very much. I think I'm willing to give it a shot.

    Another question does come to mind though. Does it matter if I use two 1gb or one 2gb? I know it's the same mathematically, but is one option better than the other in any way?
     
  10. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

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    That's why I gave the Crucial link. All you need to do is to look at what is needed and copy it over to newegg.com if you don't want to buy form Crucial... It is really helpful with desktop units... Laptops are fairly easy.
     
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