TONGFANG GK5CN5Z / GK5CN6Z / GK5CQ7Z / GK5CP0Z

Discussion in 'Other Manufacturers' started by sicily428, Apr 22, 2018.

  1. demon09

    demon09 Notebook Enthusiast

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    yep that in there lies the issue the 2060 is undoubtedly better then the 1060 but its power draw is also higher so how much better will it be when its brought down to a lv that this chasis or other laptops can cool. I don't regret buying the op 17+ at all for 989+tax it was a steal with everything it has
     
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  2. oneintheblack

    oneintheblack Notebook Enthusiast

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    Seeing the average GPU temps of this chassis is low 70s, I feel like theres some head room
     
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  3. steven weeks

    steven weeks Notebook Enthusiast

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    no 2666 is max
     
  4. demon09

    demon09 Notebook Enthusiast

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    it should support an optane module to speed up the secondary 2tb drive right? I know the 370 desktop and 390 desktop support it but was just wondering if this laptop does. I have the op 17+ and it would be nice to slap a 16gb optane in there but who knows if it supports it. I guess I could always buy it on amazon and return it if it doesnt work
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
  5. gotchapt

    gotchapt Notebook Enthusiast

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    Please just make a new thread for the new one with the RTX 2070 or it will be total confusion here
     
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  6. dreamcat4

    dreamcat4 Notebook Consultant

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    That is absolutely Correct. HOWEVER:

    The thing to realize here is that different programs generate different kinds of cpu workloads. Which profile differently. So depending upon your specific usage(s), there may not be a universal '1 size fits all' way to solve that problem.

    If you optimize for Battlefield 5 then that's great if your only demanding CPU task is battlefield 5. However, maybe you also want to run a different program, and it presents a different load to the CPU. And what if that other specific program also uses some AVX instructions? Well at least for AVX, that increase power usage substantially compared to a non AVX program. However that is then also paid back in return with a healthy return in performance.

    As stated previously by TS author and the other guy before him here. There key setting in TS is the one marked 'EP' from 0-255. That controls 'how fast' or 'how eagerly' the algorithm boosts the CPU up to the maximum 3.9ghz. If you set it to 0. Then you will not loose any cpu time. The CPU is always spun up.

    But the recommended value is about 83. Which saves power by not running at 3.9ghz all of the time. Because when the CPU is idle, a lower core frequency consumes a bit less power. And it's not doing nothing anyhow! So then your overall bench is almost the same (near enough). And your overall temps should be a bit lower. Just with that little lost time because the cpu is spinning up and down a little bit. (or a lot, if you happened to set your EP value 255 by mistake, or it's not been enabled properly, or whatever else is getting in the way, which happens pretty often due to misconfiguration).

    It would be a good idea to test this out yourself for other intensive workloads... adjusting the value between 0 and 100.

    And also try compare avx / non-avx 'real life' workloads that you actually care about. You might want to make more than one generic profile in Throttlestop. You can have up to 4 total.

    You also might want to change the max/min clock speed ratios or the undervolt setting for AVX workloads. Because AVX instructions use up so much more power. They can generate a lot more heat. But if you dont have any real life AVX workloads, then I guess that simplifies your job considerably.

    Typically, you will either end up with:

    * 2 Throttlestop profiles for battery, + 2 profiles for AC powered usage

    or

    * 3 Throttlestop profiles for battery, + 1 profile for AC powered usage

    Because there's only 4 profiles. It limits your choices.
     
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  7. TheTaxCollector

    TheTaxCollector Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hey guys, how would you rate the TongFang GK5CN6Z against the Lenovo Legion Y530?
     
  8. dreamcat4

    dreamcat4 Notebook Consultant

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    > anyone know if the 17+ laptop from walmart can run 3000 mhz ram

    Correct.

    However it might be possible to use a 3000mhz kit in order to achieve tighter timings than the Kingston HyperX CL15 kit. Which is the sort of thing I would expect these overclockers to be trying.

    I think perhaps Buildzoid on his AHOC channel was showing off a runtime tool you can use in windows. After the system has booted. In order to adjust timings?

    Otherwise its considerably more difficult to do.
     
  9. dreamcat4

    dreamcat4 Notebook Consultant

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    Well the Tongfang uses more generic hardware. Which is easier to maintain and work on. They both have under-sized batteries. But at least with the Tongfang you have potential way(s) to install a bigger one or modify the laptop. Not so with the Lenovo.

    Also Lenovo are far more likely to include firmware chips that can really brick your laptop (for example if you setup a BIOS password, then forget what that password was).

    The Tongfang is probably a lot less expensive... well what else? Thermals are best on the Tongfang, amongst ANY notebook in this size class, for the 8750H.

    Keyboard is probably better for most people on the lenovo. I don't really think there is much else to say. You might be able to get a discount from the RRP for a Lenovo. If you sign up for some discount scheme. Lenovo may have better support contract option.
     
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  10. TheTaxCollector

    TheTaxCollector Notebook Enthusiast

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    The cooling solution was one of the aspects that I was worried about on the Lenovo, but I heard that it is 'good enough' to cool the components, like you said though, TongFang is better

    About the keyboard being better on the Lenovo, are you saying that there are some "problems" on the TongFang keyboard or that the Lenovo keyboard is just far superior than the TongFang?

    Thanks.
     
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