Thinkpad x1 carbon 5th (2017) Owner's Lounge

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by hunterdt, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. grenadier

    grenadier Notebook Enthusiast

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    How do I enable disk encryption on my X1C5? I tried enabling bitlocker encryption several times, but it hangs every time during the preparation phase before the actual encryption task would even begin.

    Am I supposed to be using a non-bitlocker encryption method? If it matters I have a 1TB SM951 NVMe drive.

    EDIT: I set a hard drive password in the BIOS. Now on boot I'm asked for my fingerprint *or* hard drive password. If I use my fingerprint at this point during boot I'm also signed into windows automatically which is nice. Am I using OPAL 2.0 correctly now?
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017
  2. Danilo

    Danilo Notebook Consultant

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    I've only had my X1 Carbon for a short while, and I went with i5-7300u for that exact reason. Note that i5-7300u is actually quite close to i7-7500u in performance (both Turbo Boost to 3.5GHz, i5 has a base frequency of 2.6GHz and i7 is at 2.7GHz, the only major difference being vPro and 3/4MB cache size), so I was worried it would be annoyingly loud as well, since most reports have been comparing i5-7200u and i7-7500u instead. They also cost about the same (i5-7300u and i7-7500u).

    My experience is that i5-7300u in X1 Carbon is pretty quiet most of the time, but a fan kicks in quite quickly and loudly when CPU usage grows. There's also the wake-from-suspend bug that puts the fans at 100% in Linux that's mostly resolved with the latest kernels. Note that I am exclusively using Ubuntu 16.04 on it, though I did keep Windows in there for now in the last 50GB of the 1TB SSD.

    However, note that even with i5-7200u and i7-7500u, reviewers found no noticeable difference in performance between them (notebookcheck reviewed both, look for their long-running performance tests which catch throttling issues as well: i7 did start at 360 Cinebench score, but few minutes in was at 324, and i5 started and remained at 319), and I only went with i5-7300u because you need it to get 16GB of RAM. Basically, even with that, you are paying extra just to configure it with more RAM, and you are not getting any more performance in practice at all than you would get with i5-7200u. According to the review, the cooling system in X1 Carbon couldn't even cope with extra oomph of i7-7500u, and I doubt it would fare any better with warmer i7-7600u (turbo to 3.9, base at 2.8GHz). The only consideration I had for i7 was in thinking about resale value, but I hope to keep this X1 Carbon for a long time, so it doesn't matter much :)

    Basically, I've yet to see a thin-and-light notebook review favourably in their i7 variant in the last few years: the cooling is simply not there yet. NotebookCheck reviews are so far the best resource since they go into enough details and let their peformance tests run for 30 mins (most i7s beat i5s in the first few minutes, after that they are equal—of course, this only applies to thin and light systems like the X1 Carbon). After a mistake with my Fujitsu U904 and i7-4600u (which was not just loud but also had an annoying whirring sound which the review at NotebookCheck mentioned but I thought how bad could it be :)), I've only ever gotten i5s (in my XPS13, X1 Carbon) or fanless core m CPUs (in Thinkpad Helix 2).
     
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  3. Danilo

    Danilo Notebook Consultant

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    I've got a Dell UP2414Q 4K screen, Dell XPS 13 9343 with 3200x1800 screen and the new X1 Carbon 5th gen with WQHD screen. To compare their brightness and colour in a very crude, non-scientific way, I set my Sony A6000 to manual settings at f/4.0, ISO400, 1/400 exposure with SEL50F18 lens in a dim room (purposely dark to avoid any screen getting all white), set up all of the three as close as possible to each other and at max brightness, and took a raw/JPEG shot of them.

    Looking at the photos with Shotwell/Gimp, I'll average out all the RGB bytes to get "average brightness" (this is all wrong on so many levels, but bear with me) as a single byte (0-255 or 0-0xff).

    brightness-comparison-up2414q-x1carbon-xps13-9343.png
    In the RAW image, these are the RGB values of sample pixels I clicked on (totally arbitrary, a few others I clicked had the same relation between RGB values but did differ a bit: a better way would be to average out the entire screen in the center of the photo to avoid lens quality affecting the score):

    UP2414q: #595c5c (average 0x5b)
    X1: #424e4d (0x4a)
    XPS13: #505a60 (0x59)

    Clearly, X1 is darkest, which is unsurprising considering XPS13 was rated at 400 nits, UP2414Q at 350 nits, and X1 Carbon WQHD at 300 nits. Both X1 and XPS13 have a green/blue tint, and UP2414Q is best in reproducing pure white.

    Basically, X1 is ~83% of the brightness of my XPS13, and ~81% of the brightness of UP2414Q. XPS13 9343 got an average brightness of 373 nits in NotebookCheck review, and UP2414Q got 327 in Tom's Hardware review. That puts X1 Carbon WQHD between 264 and 310.

    brightness-comparison-up2414q-x1carbon-xps13-9343.JPG
    Double-checking the JPEG (which has additional processing by the camera itself), the relationship mostly holds. Sample pixels have the following values:

    UP2414q: #a9a8a6 (0xa8)
    X1: #769995 (0x8c)
    XPS13: #8badb6 (0xa5)

    Here, X1 is at 83% of UP2414q and 85% of XPS13, but notably, the processing exaggerates the dim red in the X1.

    FWIW, I've been running my UP2414q at very low brightness, so it's probably preserved most of the original brightness, whereas XPS13 has been used outside at highest brightness because of the reflective screen. I've also tried snapping individual images of each screen at the same static settings, but even at this distance (1.4m from screens), the camera captured subpixel arrays and I didn't want to spend more time on this.
     
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  4. AMIGrAve

    AMIGrAve Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks a lot for your response!
    I'm in the exact same situation as yours so I will follow your advice and go for the i5-7300u.
    I'm using linux too for everything related to work but this time I'd like to use linux in a virtual machine so I can have both worlds simultaneously as I'm using a lightweight window manager and being 95% of the time in terminal sessions the VM overhead should not be an issue.

    I have another concern which is about USB-C. Actually I bought a Dell XPS 15 three months ago and I lived a nightmare with the Dell support since all that time because of hardware issues (the nightmare is not yet finished actually :( )
    One of my issue was that as soon as I plugged an usbc hub on the laptop (even if nothing was plugged on the usbc hub) the fans would always spin at 2500 RPM. This was preventing me to use my external monitor and keep my work environment quiet. I could not use the hdmi port either as it was hdmi 1.4 hence not supporting high resolutions at 60Hz.

    I don't know if you have a usbc/thunderbolt screen or hub but if it's the case, have you encountered such an issue?
     
  5. grenadier

    grenadier Notebook Enthusiast

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    Regarding the 7200u vs 7300u vs 7500u - I have the 7300u and it throttles down to around 2200 under sustained load. All processor options are handicapped by the cooling system so the upgrade options offer zero performance benefits. I also got the 7300u since it was required to configure my machine with 16GB of RAM.
     
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  6. ardevd

    ardevd Newbie

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    I would argue that this is slightly misleading though. I opted for the i7-7600U because a lot of my work is CPU intensive and although an ultrabook isnt great for those sort of tasks to begin with at least I'm doing the best with what's available. However, the situtations where the extra CPU performance is most beneficial isnt when my laptop is sitting there compiling a project for an hour it's when short periods of high performance is necessary which is exactly where the difference is most noticeable. So yes, while benchmarks that measure performance over a long period of time is useful to register the thermal characteristics of a system for sustained loads, the performance during shorter workloads is probably a more useful metric for most people which is exactly why Intel Turbo Boost technology exists in the first place.

    Please note that I'm not advocating that everyone should get a i7-7600U on their X1C. My impression is that most people use their machines for very light productivity work and reap little benefit from the higher clock speeds, BUT I am arguing that if your day to day usage involve a lot of CPU intensive work, the i7-7600U will give you better performance.
     
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  7. AMIGrAve

    AMIGrAve Notebook Enthusiast

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    I'll be mostly using linux virtual machines: always one as a working environment (light window manager, most of the time in vim/terminal) and sometimes 2 others vms. I just decided that the 223 euros difference between the i5-7300u and the i7-7600u isn't worth it.
     
  8. AMIGrAve

    AMIGrAve Notebook Enthusiast

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    Can you tell me if the fans kicks on with the X1C5 when you plug your screen through USB/C ?
     
  9. Danilo

    Danilo Notebook Consultant

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    I've just tried that using Lenovo USB-C/DP adapter, and no they do not (using either of the two USB-C ports).
     
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  10. alphachaser

    alphachaser Newbie

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    What's your battery capacity? Mine's 56,050 mWh. If my math's right, at a 7000 mW discharge rate, that's only 5.6 hours of battery life. That's about what I'm getting in total battery life but everyone here's reporting 8+ hours. In Linux my battery life lasts about 10 hours.

    Anyone else getting only 5-6 hours of battery life in Windows 10 after the creator's update?

    Prior to the creator's update, I was getting close to 8 hours in Win10. I'm really considering reinstalling Windows to see if it fixes my problem.
     
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