These 24 Senators want to let your internet history be sold

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    Gabrielgvs, hmscott and Georgel like this.
  2. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Thanks, good find, everyone needs to be on the look out for being approached unsolicited, as this is a timely scam to pull right now.

    I expect to see some direct mailings from legit VPN services I've contacted in the past too, so not everything will be a scam.

    More info:

    Phony VPN Services Are Cashing in on America's War on Privacy
    NICHOLAS DELEON Apr 4 2017, 1:00pm
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/...ces-are-cashing-in-on-americas-war-on-privacy

    https://www.reddit.com/r/technology..._vpn_services_are_cashing_in_on_americas_war/

    Plex's response:
    https://forums.plex.tv/discussion/266142/spam-email-plex-reveals-new-vpn-business-www-mysafevpn-com

    It's also not a bad time to be a journalist covering internet security either, so we should get plenty of watchdog coverage from them warning us of problems.

    VPN info again, and remember "https everywhere" + "ublock origin" for Firefox and Chrome + "Privacy Badger" if kept updated will help reduce trackers from websites and stream browsing and contact tracking from ISP's.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Opera Browser Piles On More Privacy With Free VPN Feature
    David Meyer - Apr 20, 2016
    http://fortune.com/2016/04/21/opera-free-vpn/

    Opera with built-in VPN grows in the U.S. after repeal of internet privacy rules
    Oslo, Norway - April 4, 2017
    http://www.operasoftware.com/press/releases/desktop/2017-04-04

    Opera Software serves on privacy commotion in the United States
    Makes a great demand for VPN.
    https://translate.googleusercontent...379229&usg=ALkJrhiX-JGB--DDQqam_PCZRUFamWdlug

    Download Opera - Fast, secure, easy-to-use browser
    Free for Windows, with a built-in ad blocker, battery saver and free VPN.
    https://www.opera.com/?gclid=CJK94riDkdMCFQ5EfgodaLkIFQ

    How to set up a VPN (Opera, multi-os instructions)
    https://www.opera.com/blogs/news/2016/09/how-to-set-up-a-vpn-mac-windows-linux/

    If Opera doesn't install the VPN option automatically, you can install the Opera VPN extension from here:
    https://addons.opera.com/en/extensions/details/surfeasy-proxy-an-opera-software-company/
    "Description
    SurfEasy Proxy for Opera

    Fast. Easy. Reliable. Private. True privacy protection from a trustworthy company.

    SurfEasy Proxy for Opera protects your online privacy, unblocks websites, protects your security on Wi-Fi hotspots, prevents ad tracking, and encrypts data in and out of your browser with one easy to use extension.

    With SurfEasy Proxy you can:

    - Mask your IP address and geographic location.

    - Feel safe shopping, booking tickets and even banking online thanks to our bank-grade encryption.

    - Appear to be in the US or a dozen other countries.

    - Browse anonymously and avoid being tracked.

    - Access blocked websites from anywhere in the world.

    - Secure browsing on unsafe public Wi-Fi hotspots.

    - Bypass firewalls to browse without limits.

    - Unblock Facebook, SnapChat, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Skype and other sites and services that are restricted on your network.

    # How does it work? #

    We use state of the art encryption to create a secure tunnel between you and the internet. We hide your IP address and let you borrow another from one of 13 different regions, meaning that you’re untrackable and also that you can access blocked websites and geo-specific content from all over the globe.

    And we do all this without keeping logs about what your personal information, what you do online or even what you download.

    You’re our customer – not our product. Unlike free VPNs, we never log your information or sell your data to third parties. Our business model is transparent. We provide a free trial and the ability to earn more free bandwidth simply by telling your friends, adding more devices to your account or just using SurfEasy! Many of our customers love our product and pay for unlimited subscriptions – that’s how we make our money.

    # Why SurfEasy? #

    We are SurfEasy; an Opera Software company. We started with a kickstarter campaign 4 years ago, and 2 years later launched our VPN. This year, we were thrilled to be acquired by Opera, to bring our service to even more people across the globe.

    We have privacy experts like Michael Geist on our team, to ensure that we’re at the forefront of the privacy industry and to make sure that we’re always on the right track.

    We are a no-log network, meaning that we don’t keep any logs about your information, your browsing data or your download history. We don’t need this information, because we don’t sell it on to third parties. We make our money through charging a small amount for our service. This means we’re accountable, reliable, and truly secure.

    SurfEasy’s Privacy Policy
    You can find our privacy policy here: https://www.surfeasy.com/privacy_policy/

    Follow SurfEasy
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/surfeasyinc
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/SurfEasyInc
    Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Surfeasy/"
    Opera owns the SpeakEasy VPN service which you can install to run all network activity through a VPN - the Opera only VPN only does browser VPN:
    https://www.surfeasy.com/

    The SpeakEasy VPN has a "free" option, but it's only 600MB / mo + you can "earn" additional free data / mo. The monthly / yearly options / prices are reasonable.

    Your internet privacy protections are dead. Here’s why you need a no-log VPN
    By Heather Parry 29 March 2017
    https://www.surfeasy.com/blog/your-...ions-are-dead-heres-why-you-need-a-nolog-vpn/
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
    Papusan and Georgel like this.
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Rosen Introduces Bill To Restore Americans’ Internet Privacy Protections
    https://rosen.house.gov/media/press...estore-americans-internet-privacy-protections

    *View Rep. Rosen’s Floor Speech*

    WASHINGTON, DC - "Today, Congresswoman Jacky Rosen (NV-03) released the following statement after introducing her first bill, H.R. 1868, the Restoring American Privacy Act of 2017, which will reverse the Congressional resolution signed by President Trump allowing internet providers to sell their customers’ personal information without their knowledge or consent. The Congresswoman released the following statement after introducing her bill on the House floor:

    “As someone who has first-hand experience as a computer programmer, I know that keeping privacy protections in place is essential for safeguarding vulnerable and sensitive data from hackers,” said Congresswoman Jacky Rosen."
     
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Georgel likes this.
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Why one Republican voted to kill privacy rules: “Nobody has to use the Internet”
    Republicans encounter angry citizens after killing online privacy rules.
    JON BRODKIN - 4/14/2017, 1:03 PM

    "A Republican lawmaker who voted to eliminate Internet privacy rules said, "Nobody's got to use the Internet" when asked why ISPs should be able to use and share their customers' Web browsing history for advertising purposes.

    US Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) was hosting a town hall meeting when a constituent asked about the decision to eliminate privacy rules. The person in the audience was disputing the Republican argument that ISPs shouldn't face stricter requirements than websites such as Facebook.

    "Facebook is not comparable to an ISP. I do not have to go on Facebook," the town hall meeting attendee said. But when it comes to Internet service providers, the person said, "I have one choice. I don't have to go on Google. My ISP provider is different than those providers."

    That's when Sensenbrenner said, "Nobody's got to use the Internet." He praised ISPs for "invest[ing] an awful lot of money in having almost universal service now." He then said, "I don't think it's my job to tell you that you cannot get advertising for your information being sold. My job, I think, is to tell you that you have the opportunity to do it, and then you take it upon yourself to make the choice."

    People "ought to have more choices rather than fewer choices with the government controlling our everyday lives," he concluded, before moving on to the next question.

    "He said that nobody has to use the Internet. They have a choice," Sensenbrenner's press office explained on Twitter.

    Video was posted on Twitter yesterday by American Bridge 21st Century, a political action committee that says it is "committed to holding Republicans accountable for their words and actions."

    Rules would have given customers a choice
    Sensenbrenner did not address the fact that the privacy rules would have let customers make a choice about whether their data is tracked and used. The rules would have required ISPs to get customers' opt-in consent before using, sharing, or selling their Web browsing history and app usage history. Because Congress eliminated the rules before they could go into effect, ISPs can continue to use customers' browsing and app usage history without offering anything more than a chance to opt out. Without such rules, customers may not even be aware that they have a choice.

    The rules were issued last year by the Federal Communications Commission and eliminated this month when President Donald Trump signed a repeal that was approved along party lines in Congress. There are no privacy rules that apply to ISPs now, but ISPs say they will let customers opt out of systems that use browsing history to deliver targeted ads.

    Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who introduced the resolution to eliminate privacy rules, was also confronted about the privacy rules at a town hall on Thursday. Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) recently said he'd be willing to release his own browsing history in response to a question on a radio show. A recent survey found that 72 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of Democrats opposed the rollback of privacy rules."
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2017
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    NET NEUTRALITY
    Canada Just Ruled to Uphold Net Neutrality
    JORDAN PEARSON Apr 20 2017, 1:23pm

    "Happy 420, internet friends.
    On Thursday afternoon, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the country's federal telecom regulator, dropped a bombshell ruling on the status of net neutrality—the principle that all web services should be treated equally by providers. And, blessedly, it's good news.

    The CRTC ruled that "[internet] service providers should treat data traffic equally to foster consumer choice, innovation and the free exchange of ideas," a CRTC news release states. What this means is that service providers won't be able to privilege certain services over others—say, YouTube or Apple Music—by letting you use them without dinging your data plan. This is a practice generally known as "zero-rating" or differential pricing."

    Thank goodness some governments are listening, and understand, and are strong enough to act for the betterment of their citizens.

    CRTC strengthens its commitment to net neutrality, consumer choice and free exchange of ideas by citizens
    https://www.canada.ca/en/radio-tele...menttonetneutralityconsumerchoiceandfre0.html

    At least we know it can be done somewhere, maybe with some help from us it can happen where we all live too.

    Pretty awesome :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
    Fishon likes this.
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    pfSense: Network Intrusion Detection w/Suricata (pt4)


    pfSense Part 3: Controlling Routes


    pfSense Part 2: Secure Yourself with a VPN


    pfSense Part 1: The Build and Initial Setup
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2017
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    NetNeutrality - Canada, then US, starting at 05:55:
    And, a mention of how to block ISP caching servers to get better Netflix / youtube throughput:
     
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