These 24 Senators want to let your internet history be sold

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    Oh no, I totally get that. But I also know it remains illegal for example, to violate Hipaa. The nexus of my concern is closer to the potential applications of algorithms to the data sets by either public or private institutions, and the subsequent implications. I am careful with sensitive personal data but as you point out in the effective sense, it's the comprehensive nature of the snooping which poses the threat.
     
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  2. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    Eh, most of what I do online is talk about computers, anime, look up local events, browse StackExchange, and watch (mostly educational) YouTube videos, as well as looking for reaction pictures/gifs for giggles. Worst that would realistically happen there is that I receive targeted advertising for those sort of things (good or bad?). Or potentially link my online accounts together (say, they could figure out that my NBR account is the same person as this Discord account and this Facebook account, etc.); personally also not much an issue for me since I don't post anything of interest online (because let's be real, there's no such thing as privacy online; only fools believe that).

    There is a negative side to using a VPN, and that is that it will (severely, potentially) impact the performance of your internet connection. That is the main reason why I don't bother with using a VPN in most cases (for example, no point in doing that if I'm playing an online game, for example). And personally, I'm okay with the concept of targeted advertising (it's a moot point for me anyway since I use ABP/Ghostery/etc., though I do sign up for newsletters from Newegg, Microcenter, etc.).

    To be blunt, you and I are just a number to companies. You're not very interesting and neither am I. I can see your point if you were a high-value person, for sure, but for the Average Joe your main worries should be placed in the NSA and in your next-door script kiddie trying to leech off your WiFi.
     
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  3. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    . . .and, there it is.

    I've said it before. . . we're all on the bus together. If we don't drive it ourselves, you better be damned sure someone will be there to take the wheel and go wherever the hell suits there own purposes.
     
  4. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    HIPAA, in simplistic terms, only protects you in relation to the professional medical industry (hospitals, doctors, insurance, etc.). So for example, HIPAA would protect you against me going rogue and exposing your most recent medical claims (I work for an insurance company), but not from Google knowing that you searched for a gut disease on WebMD.
     
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  5. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    It matters less to me who sees it, as long as it remains illegal for the information to be used against me. For now, it does.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Check out jayz2cents video review, his VPN service local to him gives a ping time increase of only 4ms, certainly good enough for gaming, and his throughput is over 200mbit/sec, also more than fast enough. Even his long distance VPN servers were fast, but hit 114ms ping.

    I've had no performance long term problems with private or public VPN's once they are configured and tuned for optimal use.

    Value is in the eye's of the beholder, science to one man appears as magic to another, all that seems dull on one side of the fence looks to be lush and green from the other side. It's all perspective, as even a blank has a use when the need arises.

    It's a disservice to yourself and to others to provide an example that so clearly is of a high target value and claim it's of no value. you are seeing it from the wrong perspective :)
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, not so much :)

    Once the data is collected, it's collected forever, never to be lost, waiting for that day when it can be cashed in for the most value.

    Your collected data may be safe today, but tomorrow is another day, with different rules and different laws, with different expediencies in play, with different authorities saying what's what.

    The anonymized data on offer today could just as easily merge with your identifiable data and become the complete and detailed identifiable data on offer tomorrow.

    The only safe data is the data not collected in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2017
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  8. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    Hmm? I'm pretty sure the CEO of a defense company or a Senator has far more juicy information than my Youtube vocaloid playlist can provide ;). Unless you're talking about online banking, in which case there's already a solution to that (HTTPS, SSL/TLS and trusted certificates). As for Jayz2Cents, do you have a link to that video? I'm willing to bet that he also pays a fair amount for that VPN service, which is another consideration to factor.

    But yeah, you and I are unique and important. Just like everyone else ;)
     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Hiding among the masses makes you stand out, just like everyone else.

    Every situation needs a player, and your number comes up just like everyone else's, it's just a matter of time, place, and luck of the draw.

    The odds may be high, but the numbers are being pulled at a much higher rate than you'd expect, everyone's number comes up.

    At least in your case, it'll be one hell of a surprise ;)

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...t-history-be-sold.802409/page-9#post-10499646
     
  10. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    Ah, thanks for the link. Must have missed it... Unfortunately I'll have to look at it later since I'm at work.

    Anywho, regarding the latest post. I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that you're equating the harm of something like a hack specified at a target of interest (say, Wikileaks and DNC emails) to the harm of big data driven advertising (for example, Facebook ads for Asus on my wall). Personally I don't equate the two, and see quite a big difference between someone being Microcenter AdvertID03275283560 vs some John Doe showing up in the Ashley Madison hacks. One helps the person get rid of old hardware with new hardware, the other helps them get rid of their marriage and a huge chunk of their bank account ;).
     
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