Thermal paste performance degradation

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Brabulla, Feb 27, 2018.

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  1. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    MX-4, and other TIM's, will usually do well where the temps are not ever getting that high. It is the systems that breach the 95c or constantly hit temps creating thermal throttling that usually have an issue. Needless to say it has to get pretty hot for boil out to occur.
     
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  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    On desktops MX4 will do. On laptops MX4 or similar will give you worse performance than stock paste after 2 weeks or less. You are free to try it.
     
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  3. pigulici

    pigulici Notebook Guru

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    Not sure but for me MX-4 it is ok, for laptops too, I used in last 2-3 years...
     
  4. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    I used MX-4 for a while in my old Acer 5930G... and I have to say that I had much better success with Gelid GC Extreme as the temperatures were better and I didn't have to repaste since using it.
     
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  5. gamefoo21

    gamefoo21 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I just used my T61 to do my taxes on. It's had MX-4 installed in it for over three years, when I swapped out the T7300 and upgraded it to a T9300. Without any helping and just using the stock curve in TP-fan control, under Windows 10 Pro 1709 x64, running windows updates, and edge with lots of tabs, it never got over 55'C. The NVS140M also means I can't idle temps low worth a damn on it without the undervolt bios, but for fairness I was running stock volts.

    T420s is only a year. The T7200 in my Qosmio G30 is actually I think 4 or 5 years old, and the fans on it almost never rev up. I also have the factory throttling on the CPU disabled. Silly Toshiba setting the bios to throttle 50% all the time...

    Yeah, me too, which is shocking. I mean the only time I had a bad result was on a Sony TB33, since the northbridge chip needs a thermal pad and MX-4 can't make up .5mm of a gap, its been in there for... 3 years too, and the fan still blows hot air, and that thing has a really lame cooler. Though I guess for the thousands of installs, a few are bound to get a bad tube, or have a bad mount.
     
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  6. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    I notice a lot of people who have had success with MX-4 are using it with old CPUs such as Celeron/Pentiums with high TDPs of 30-40W. I believe people with modern Core U, HQ, HK, (4th gen and above) will have a lot less success with MX-4. With modern chips, idling CPU power can be lower than 1W, but max load package powers can be much more. Whilst the TDP of these processors, 15 for U series and 45W for HQ and HK have been lower, so has cooling standards from laptop manufacturers. When OEMs design a laptop with a specific CPU, they will design the cooling for the TDP limit ONLY. For older CPUs, the operating power range might be

    There are a lot of enthusiasts here who like to improve the performance. I've seen 7700HQs unlocked from 45W to 60+ Watts. My 15W 8250U can be unlocked to 40W. The issue arises when the petty cooling solution in laptops is overloaded by enthusiasts, and MX-4 is no good when temperatures rise high. I once had an AMD E2-1800 which idled at 50C and never rose above 80C, even though it was a 18W CPU. I also once had a Core i7-6500U, which had a TDP of 15W but when unlocking the TDP the CPU would rise to 99C. All the older CPUs don't appear to have TurboBoost. TurboBoost is basically automatic overclocking. If I ran my 6500U at its base speed, the temperature wouldn't go over 70C. If I can my 8250U at base speed, it wouldn't go above 60C. TurboBoost is SUPPOSED to only work for short periods to give a kick in performance (such as opening Word, Photoshop, or browsers) but a lot of enthusiasts here raise the TDP of their chips, allowing them to Turbo indefinitely, as long as the cooling allows. With TurboBoost, TDP doesn't mean anything anymore.
     
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  7. bennni

    bennni Notebook Evangelist

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    Just a note: Turboboost in notebooks has been around since the first gen Arrandale/Clarksfield CPU's - which was eight years ago now. While some people might be running older CPU's than that, I'd say that it's safe to assume that the sizable majority of users are running CPU's with TB. There was also a form of dynamic overclocking in a previous generation CPU, which had a different name, IIR. EDIT: It was called Dynamic Acceleration (IDA).
     
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  8. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I was using ceramique 2 paste on my vaio with t7100 and core 2 duo desktop which ran great and had lower temps. Fast forward now, those paste(s) perform poorly since heatsink is flimsy and temps worsen after each day.
     
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