Thermal Help

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by FaTT, Dec 11, 2017.

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  1. FaTT

    FaTT Notebook Consultant

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    Hi I'm running the 6600k in my sig, with the h100i v2 I have on there I can get a stable OC to 4.5-4.6 GHZ without changing the voltage (changing voltage scares me I fried a cpu a few years back kinds scared to do it again) running cpuburner in furmark at 4.6 I'm running mid 60's peaking at 70-71c as soon as I go to 4.7-4.8 its stable just sends my temps through the roof, (virturally instant it jumps to 80+ and keeops going I did a emergency shutdown because it hit 91) my question is is it worth it to invest in a ekwb kit? am I going to get better thermals then this h100i v2? and if it will help my thermals is it going to be enough to justify the 350+ upgrade to the cooling system?A ive never had 100mhz jump my thermals so much before I generally loose stability before thermals as long as I don't do too drastic of a jump. Is that normal?

    the pic is after running for 2 hours at 4.6
     

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  2. Arrrrbol

    Arrrrbol Notebook Deity

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    Is your 6600k delided? Doing that and applying some liquid metal will give you a significant temperature drop.
     
  3. FaTT

    FaTT Notebook Consultant

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    No it is not, and to be honest never heard of it before is it hard to do?
     
  4. Arrrrbol

    Arrrrbol Notebook Deity

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    Its not too hard nowadays, you can get deliding tools that make it much easier. You can do it without one if you use a razor blade, but you need to be careful when doing that for obvious reasons.

    Once you've delided it, remove the old crappy thermal paste and then you can apply a small amount of liquid metal (such as Conductonaut) to the die and IHS. There are loads of guides on how to do this in the correct proportions. If liquid metal worries you, even repasting with normal thermal paste will give you lower temps. After doing that you just need something to seal the IHS back to the chip and then you are done.
     
  5. FaTT

    FaTT Notebook Consultant

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    well ill def look into it but the idea of cutting open my cpu makes me really scared lol
     
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  6. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    Theres 3d printed tools or the retail delid tools like rockit or diemate. I used a 3d printed tool (with a lot of infill so it is strong) in a vice on my 6700k and the crack when the adhesive let go was scary but there was no problem. You just tighten to the point you get resistance, and take it very slowly from there.

    There's a point at which the thermal paste is "saturated". The paste tim is ok if you run at stock, but the added heat from OC exposes the limits of the paste and this is why delid is a thing. If you chart your frequencies, power draw, and temps, and compare how much each 100MHz "costs", you'll see the point at which it starts rising steeply. This happens with every chip at some point, delidding just means you can shove some more mhz and volts through it before it starts to get out of control.

    I also found my p870's 6700K was quieter at idle, almost silent actually, as it needed less fans to maintain the temps under idle/low load (I had conductonaut on top of the IHS and on my GPUs as well).
     
  7. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Wait, you're afraid of raising the voltages because you might end up frying the CPU, but you don't worry about overclocking the CPU (which would do the same)?

    I don't get the logic behind this.

    Still, my advice on the subject would be to software undervolt the CPU on stock, or on a mild overclock and use better thermal paste (such as GeLid extreme or LM Conductonaut - in case of Conductonaut, you need to be careful on the application as it's highly corrosive and you need to protect surrounding parts of the CPU) and of course clean out the machine of any lingering dust.

    Since it's an Intel CPU, a de-lid as previously suggested might help too in dropping temperatures most - but be advised that de-lidding could damage the CPU in question.
     
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