The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    They usually do that on budget models including ideapad and Thinkpad.
     
  2. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    To get rid of EDP OTHER throttling, try increasing the Core IccMax value. Your screenshot shows that this is set to 64.00 Amps. For testing, I would double this to 128.00 Amps. The only way to fix Thermal issues is to pull your laptop apart and try to improve the cooling. New thermal paste, drilling holes in the case to improve air flow, etc. Hacking up ones new laptop with a Dremel is not for everyone. :)

    On the main ThrottleStop screen it shows PROCHOT 96°C and this has a check mark beside it. This is a record of CPU throttling due to your CPU cores reaching this temperature. Before you do any testing, you can click on this box to clear this information from the CPU. After you are finished testing, you should not see a check mark in this box. Thermal throttling is the CPU rapidly cycling between 800 MHz or less and full speed, many, many times per second. Best to avoid this. If you are not going to try to physically improve the cooling performance of your laptop, your idea to slow the CPU down a little to avoid thermal throttling is a good idea.

    I think it depends on the manufacturer. On a ULV CPU you cannot overclock by adjusting the turbo ratios higher but as long as ThrottleStop shows that they are not locked, you should be able to lower these to slow the CPU down for better thermal control.

    I will agree that enabling or disabling C1E does not make a huge difference but C1E is still used in modern CPUs. I usually have it disabled but Intel recommends to always leave C1E enabled. On battery power, leaving C1E enabled might be best but I do not have any test data to prove this. The difference in battery run time is probably minimal.

    Your U CPU is able to run well beyond its designed 15 Watt TDP limit so using this feature to shuffle the power budget between the CPU cores and Intel GPU might not be a useful feature for you. I have rarely heard about any use for this feature but I know when I remove it, then the complaints will start. It never hurts to do some testing and play with different values. Just don't expect to see any huge changes in performance.

    A Speed Shift EPP setting of 128 can interfere with maximum performance on some CPUs so I also recommend setting EPP to 80. Open up the FIVR window, look at the live data in the table at the top right and make sure your CPU is using whatever EPP value you have chosen in ThrottleStop. Windows 10 can interfere with this setting. If you set EPP to 80 in ThrottleStop but the FIVR window still shows 128, that means Windows is in charge of this setting. In that case, do not put a check mark in the Speed Shift EPP box on the main screen because it will just cause a fight between Windows and ThrottleStop over who controls EPP.
     
  3. Fernando Pena

    Fernando Pena Notebook Enthusiast

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    Changing IccMax is definitely something I will test. Thanks for the tip. But what exactly is IccMax?
    EDIT: I noticed that values for IccMax for cpu core and cpu cache are quite different... for the CPU Core is 64 and CPU Cache is just 6. Should I change only for the cache or both?
    This laptop is pretty new (a couple of months), so I think thermal paste is still in good shape. But I definitely gonna repaste sometime in the future.
    PROCHOT 96°C always get checked even though this option is disabled. I always clear that before running benchmarks and tests, but it gets checked again from time to time.

    Yeah, I'll probably gonna leave that untouched.

    Gonna test that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    The PROCHOT box is just an indicator box. When this box shows a check mark, that tells you that your CPU has been thermal throttling. At least one core reached 96°C so the CPU was forced to slow down to protect it from damage. Manually clearing this box simply erases this information from the CPU. Next time your CPU overheats, this box will show a check mark again. I included this so that you do not have to be looking at ThrottleStop 24/7. When you are finished gaming or running a demanding task, you can open up ThrottleStop at any time and have a look to see if any thermal throttling has occurred. A yellow THERMAL box in Limit Reasons also confirms that your CPU has been thermal throttling.

    Your laptop might be fairly new but that is no guarantee that the factory did a great job applying thermal paste. Laptops are mass produced and shipped half way around the world. Even flexing a laptop on your knee can loosen up a heatsink over time. There is almost always room for improvement. Read some reviews to see what thermal paste works well in laptops.

    If your laptop is only thermal throttling when stress testing it to the max then this is not something you have to immediately worry about. During normal use, your laptop might rarely if ever thermal throttle. If that is the case, no worries. The Intel specified thermal throttling temperature for your CPU is 100°C. Lenovo reduced that by 4°C so you are not going to hurt your CPU. It will start thermal throttling and slowing down a little early so it should never reach, let alone exceed, the Intel maximum safe temperature.

    Edit - When testing, I would crank up IccMax sky high. I think in ThrottleStop, only the primary CPU Core IccMax is important. The one that ThrottleStop lists as Cache IccMax may not be important at all. Without proper documentation, feedback or access to a wide range of modern CPUs; I am not 100% sure what this one does. It was included in case someone, somewhere with some CPU needed it.

    IccMax is how much current is going to flow through your CPU. It will not force your CPU to explode. Removing this limitation just allows your CPU to reach its maximum designed speed. When stress testing, lower this value and see how your CPU reacts. See what lights up in red in Limit Reasons and see what happens to your MHz. Less IccMax is bad so more must be good!
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
  5. terrorific

    terrorific Notebook Guru

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    Hey so I tried the IccMax, and the value of 32 gave me a max PL2 of 35, which I required! thanks. I wonder what would happen if increase it beyond 128, that is my default value for the performance profile, and max power on a -152v and 67PL2 is 66.2w. And I've never achieved more than 67.3w ever on my i78750H. Also, my RIng EDP Other is always yellow, never goes away even after clearing, what can it be?
     
  6. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Maybe Ring EDP Other would go away. You can also try increasing the PP0 Current Limit in the TPL window. One or the other often times will cure EDP Other throttling.
     
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  7. Fernando Pena

    Fernando Pena Notebook Enthusiast

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    What is this PP0 Power Limit? Would that help in my case either?
     
  8. thefatapple

    thefatapple Notebook Geek

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    Anyone know how to lock CPU+turbo at a static speed? ie lock at, say, 3.500ghz? Or a guide? My CPU+turbo jumps and goes down constantly. I tried clicking TPL settings, clicked both two top Clamp options and it's stable but not locked (CPU speed fluctuates within a range of 50-80mhz) and now I can't unclick Clamp check marks for some reason :vbconfused: I tried reading this entire thread but it's so long :vbconfused:
     
  9. judal57

    judal57 Notebook Deity

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    enabling high performance mode on windows 10 works for me. i am at 3.5ghz all the time on all cores ( i7 4710hq)
     
  10. GreatD

    GreatD Notebook Consultant

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    Set Speedshift EPP SST to 0 to get full turbo CPU frequency always :)
     
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