The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. James D

    James D Notebook Prophet

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    unclewebb, Throttlestop has a feature to detect usage on battery and being turned off in that scenario but can I ask why there is no feature as "Load Profile # when on battery"?
    There is a profile called Battery after all so this feature seems intuitive to me.
     
  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Some BIOS might be glitchy when querying battery usage that is why its disabled by default. You can check Options and find battery profile when AC power is unplugged and also Load Profile 'X' when on battery.
     
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  3. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    Your results intrigue me! What are your experiences with graphie sheets so far? I got a laptop with uncooled VRMs and was considering using graphite sheets to bridge the heat from VRMs to the heatsink
     
  4. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    What laptop have you got?
     
  5. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    XPS 15. Some people used thermal pads to connect VRMs to the heatsinks, but I am interested to see if graphite pads are a better option
     
  6. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Ah, they're heatsinking to the bottom cover. It's rather tricky to get all those irregular-height components to make good contact. If you slapped graphite sheet on the VRM you'd touch the inductors but not the MOSFETs. I've used an XPS 15 2-in-1 for a bit and the keyboard deck temperatures could be tolerably a lot higher. So if I had an XPS 15 I would definitely do keyboard-side cooling like I did on the MateBook: cover the keyboard backside with graphite sheets and put thermal pads under the motherboard backside. Oh and if there is any GORE insulation I would remove that. But yeah, graphite sheets can spread quite a bit of heat.
     
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  7. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    They seem to be very flexible, so I could just put it on top of them and keep them pressed in with thermal pads. The main selling point is ridiculously high horizontal heat transfer rate over thermal pads.

    I would keep the insulation, but I think having the graphite sheets would be swell
     
  8. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Cool, looking forward to seeing what you do with them!
     
  9. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    I don’t think it will be anything special. Like just a normal repaste results, but with cooler VRMs so it won’t VR throttle. I’ll make a post if I get noteworthy results
     
  10. Eason

    Eason Notebook Virtuoso

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    Only issue with aluminum/heat distribution is that higher distributed heat may mean more failure, as manufacturers tend to cheap out and use other components with lower temperature thresholds than the CPUs are made to withstand.
     
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